Advanced Adirondack Chair Stepbystep

PHOTO A: Make templates for the arms and legs, trace the parts onto blanks for the workpieces and cut the parts with a jig saw.

Clamping taper jig

PHOTO A: Make templates for the arms and legs, trace the parts onto blanks for the workpieces and cut the parts with a jig saw.

Cut out the arms & legs

© Cut pairs of blanks to length for the arms, front legs and back legs as specified on the Cutting List, page 16.

© Refer to the drawings on page 17 to construct full-sized templates for the arms, front legs and back legs. Stiff cardboard will work if you plan to build only one of these chairs, but Win. hardboard is a better choice because the template can be reused again and again. Bend a piece of flexible hardboard to help form the gradual curved profiles when you draw them on the templates. Cut the templates to shape, and smooth the edges as needed.

© Lay the templates on the arm and leg workpieces, draw the shapes and cut out the arms and legs with a jig saw (See Photo A).

Make the back slats

The chair's back slats taper on both edges along their full length. You could shape the slats by first making a template from x/4-in. hardboard, tracing the profiles on the slat blanks, and then using a jig saw to cut out the slats. An alternate method is to build a simple clamping jig (See Clamping Taper Jig, right), to cut the tapered back slats on the table saw instead. The jig will allow you to make the tapered cuts quickly and produce smooth, flat edges on the slats.

© Cut seven blanks for the back slats to length from 1x4 stock. Note: All the slats start out the same length at this stage, but six of the seven will be trimmed to actual length later during chair assembly.

© Lay out the end radius and draw the tapered edges on the slat blanks, using the Back Slats drawing on page 17.

0 Cut the tapered edges on the back slats. If you use

This clamping jig allows you to make tapered cuts on the table saw using the saw's rip fence as your guide. Build the jig by fastening a piece of 3/4-in. "L"-shaped scrap to a length of V4-in. plywood. Thg thin plywood serves as a base to support the work-pieces, and ithe "L"-shaped piece guides the slats at an angle through the blade. Select the jig base from a piece of plywood longer than your back-slat workpieces. Cut the 3/4-in. stock into an "L" shape, so the long inside edge of the "L" matches the taper angles you'll cut on the back slats. Fasten the jig parts so the back slats rest in the "L" guide, and one cutting line on the slat workpieces lines up with the edge of the jig base. Attach a toggle clamp to the jig to hold the workpieces in place as you cut. Slide the jig along the: rip fence with the workpiece clamped in place to make the cuts. Once you cut the first taper, save the angled wastepiece-you'll need It to serve as a spacer for making the tapered cut along the opposite long edge of each slat.

the table saw and jig method for making these cuts, cut one tapered edge on each slat first. To do this, adjust the rip fence on the table saw so the jig rests against the rip fence, and the outside edge of the jig base is flush with the blade. Set the slats into the jig and clamp securely. Slide the jig and workpiece past the blade to make the first taper cuts.

© Cut the second tapered edge on the back slats. Set one of the scrap wastepieces you made in Step 6 into the crook of the "L" on the jig, and flip each slat over in the jig so the tapered edge you just cut on the slats rests against the "L". This configuration should align the second taper cutting line on each workpiece with the edge of the jig base for making the second taper cuts. Clamp the slats in the jig and make the taper cuts (See Photo B).

© Cut the radiused ends of the slats with your jig saw. Sand the cuts smooth.

Cut the remaining profiled parts

© Cut the front and rear arm braces to size and shape. The exact curvature of the profiles on these parts isn't critical, but like parts should match.

© Cut the upper back cleat, the lower back cleat, the shaped seat slat and the stretcher to size and shape. The profiles on these parts are simple arcs of various circles, and the radiuses are specified in the drawings on page 17. To establish the radiuses, first rip- and crosscut blanks for the parts. Clamp each workpiece to your benchtop. Find the centerline of the work-piece and extend the line onto the bench. Measure from the workpiece along the centerline the distance of the radius to establish the centerpoint for drawing the arc. Fashion a large compass by driving a nail into the worksurface at the centerpoint. Attach a string to the nail, and loop a pencil to the string at the appropriate radius. Mark arcs on the workpieces, and cut out the parts.

Make the back supports & seat slats

(!) Crosscut the back supports to length, and trim the top ends to a 60° angle, as shown in the Side View drawing, page 17.

© Cut the 14 seat slats to size. Rip 3/4-in. stock to 1 in. wide on the table saw or with a circular saw. Cut the slats to length. Crosscutting the slats is quick to do with a power miter saw if you clamp a stop to the saw fence. Or you could also use a circular saw.

PHOTO B: Cut tapered edges on the back slats. We used a table saw jig for making these angled cuts. Once you've cut the first tapered edge, > flip the slats over in the jig and cut the second tapered edge.
Adirondack Chair Jig
PHOTO C: Sand the chair parts smooth, and prime all surfaces with exterior latex primer. Primer will seal the wood and provide an even bonding surface for topcoating with paint.

Prime the parts

Because this chair is intended to remain outside in all kinds of weather and needs to be well sealed, it's a good idea to prime the surfaces of all the parts at this stage before you begin assembly. Also, since the chair will be assembled with screws but no glue, priming now will not affect glue bonds.

© Sand and smooth all the chair parts. Prime the parts with latex-based primer (See Photo C).

Build the arm assemblies

© Attach the front arm braces to the outside of the front legs, with the top edges flush. The braces should set back 3A in. from the front edges of the front legs.

PHOTO D: Attach the arms to the arm braces on the front legs and back supports. Drive screws though the arms and down into the front legs as well. Drill countersunk pilot holes before you install the screws.

PHOTO F: Lay the back slats in place on the upper and lower back cleats.The tops of the back slats should follow the curve of an 18-in. radius. Mark the centerpoint of this radius on the center slat, and use a trammel or simple string compass to position the rest of the slats. Mark the slats for trimming where they intersect the lower back cleat.

© Attach the rear arm braces to the outside faces of the back supports, with the top edges of the braces set 20% in. from the bottom ends of the supports.

® Attach the arms to the front legs and back supports with 2-in. galvanized deck screws (See Photo D). Refer to the Side View and Front View drawings on page 17 for more information about exact placement of the arms.

{& Attach the back legs to the inner faces of the front legs and the outer faces of the back supports. Position

PHOTO E: Fasten the back legs to the inside face of the front legs and the outside face of the back supports with screws. Hold the parts in position with spring clamps to keep the parts from shifting.

PHOTO G: Drill countersunk pilot holes for attaching the back slats to the upper and lower cleats. You may want to draw a reference line across the slats first to help establish screw placement on the upper back cleat. Attach the parts and remove the temporary spacer.

the back legs so that the front tip of the back leg overhangs the front leg by IV4 in. Adjust the parts until the measurement from the front edge of the front leg to the front edge of the back support is 21XA in. Clamp the assemblies, drill countersunk pilot holes and attach the parts with 21/2-in. galvanized deck screws (See Photo E).

Build the back assembly

© Cut two temporary spacers to hold the upper and lower back cleats in position while you attach the back slats. Cut the spacers 183/s in. long.

CD Stand the upper and lower back cleats on their flat back edges, and clamp the temporary spacers from Step 18 between the cleats. Lay the back slats into the curves on the cleats. Insert V2-in. spacers between the back slats to hold them evenly apart. Adjust the center back slat so it is even with the bottom face of the lower back cleat. Arrange the rest of the slats on the cleats so their top curved ends follow an 18-in.-radius arc. The easiest way to lay out this arc is to make a mark 18 in. from the top of the center slat and use this as the centerpoint for a trammel or string compass when you swing an arc. Adjust the back slats so the curved ends intersect with the end of the compass. Draw a line on the back slats where they cross the lower back cleat (See Photo F).

© Remove the back slats and trim the bottom ends.

: ' Reposition the slats on the back cleats, drill countersunk pilot holes and fasten the slats to the cleats with 2-in. galvanized deck screws (See Photo G).

Assemble the chair ® Clamp the back assembly in position between the arm assemblies, with the lower back cleat held back 3/4 in. from the point where the curved seat profile begins on the top edge of the back legs. The upper back cleat should rest on the back supports.

1 Install the stretcher between the front legs; this will keep the structure rigid while you attach the back assembly. Fasten the stretcher 4 in. up from the bottoms of the front legs.

Q ; Attach the back assembly. Fasten the lower cleat to the back legs with 2-in. galvanized deck screws and the upper back cleats into the back supports with 21/2-in, deck screws (See Photo H).

' _ Attach the seat slats. Remove the arms temporarily, for easier access to the screws. Attach the shaped seat slat first. Space the remaining seat slats evenly so they follow the full length of the curved profile on the back legs. Fasten the slats with countersunk 2-in. deck screws (See Photo I). Reattach the arms.

Finishing touches v': Fill all of the recessed screw holes with wood or auto body filler. Let the filler dry and sand smooth. Spot-prime the filled screw heads.

© Brush on two coats of exterior latex paint.

PHOTO H: Set the back assembly in place between the two arm assemblies and clamp the parts together. Drive screws through the upper and lower cleats into the back supports and back legs.

PHOTO I: Remove the arm pieces to provide clearance for attaching the seat slats. Install the seat slats along the profiled areas of the back legs starting with the shaped seat slat. Space the slats evenly apart along the back leg. A V4-in.-thick scrap spacer will help keep the slat spacing uniform as you install the slats.

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PHOTO I: Remove the arm pieces to provide clearance for attaching the seat slats. Install the seat slats along the profiled areas of the back legs starting with the shaped seat slat. Space the slats evenly apart along the back leg. A V4-in.-thick scrap spacer will help keep the slat spacing uniform as you install the slats.

Patio Table & Chairs

This patio table and chair set is significantly more formal than the traditional picnic table and benches, yet it is very easy to build. Made entirely of cedar for all-weather durability and beauty, this table will be the centerpiece of many memorable summer meals for you and your family. And if you need a table that is slightly larger, it's a simple matter to expand the table length and build a couple more chairs.

Vital Statistics: Patio Table & Chairs

to minimize sharp edges - Table aprons reinforced with corner braces to strengthen leg joints finishing options: p sealer or leave unfinished to naturally to

TYPE: Patio table and chairs

OVERALL SIZE: Table: 48W by 48L by 30H

Chairs: 18W by 23L by 36v2h

MATERIAL: Cedar JOINERY: Butt joints reinforced with galvanized deck screws

CONSTRUCTION DETAILS: Many parts on both the table and chairs are chamfered

Building time

>/i preparing stock 0 hours i"^. layout * 3-4 hours

cutting parts 2-3 hours

* assembly 6-8 hours finishing 2-4 hours

TOTAL: 13-19 hours

Tools you'll use

Table saw

Power miter saw

Router table and piloted chamfering bit

Drill/driver

Clamps

Combination square

Shopping list

□ (2) 4 x 4 in. x 6 ft. or (1)4x4 in. x 10 ft. cedar

□ Finishing materials

Finishing Material Chairs

Patio Chair Cutting List

Patio Table Cutting List

Patio Table & Chairs

3/ô" chamfered leg bottoms, typ.

3/s" chamfered edges, typ.

3/ö" chamfered leg bottoms, typ.

Jo. Size Material

B. Front legs

C. Upper frame sides 2 3A x 3V2 x I7V2 in

Jo. Size Material

4 3V2 x 3V2 x 28V2 in. Cedar

E. Lower frame sides 2 3A x IV2 x 17V2 in

I. Aprons

F. Lower frame ends 2 3A x IV2 x 16 in

jJ-r

4"

Dor F

FRONT VIEW

SIPE VIEW

TOP VIEW: SEAT FRAMES

31/2"

71/4"

31/2"

3V2"

BACK LEGS

30"

chamfers, typ.

FRONT VIEW

TOP VIEW: CORNER DETAIL

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