Breezeway Boot Bench Stepbystep

Tedswoodworking Plans

16.000 Woodworking Plans by Ted McGrath

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PHOTO A: Assemble the front and back panels by attaching pairs of long cleats to groups of five slats. Use spacers between the slats to hold them apart V2 in. Attach the cleats to the spacers with countersunk screws.

PHOTO B: Nail the cedar bottom slats to the top edges of the long and short cleats to form the bench bottom. Separate the slats with V2-in.-thick spacers as you fasten the slats in place.

Make the front & back panels

O Make the front and back slats. Cut the ten slats to length from 1x6 white oak stock, and sand the ends smooth. Cut the long and short cleats to length using 1x2 stock.

0 Build the front and back panels. Cut four spacers, V2 x % x 18% in., and clamp them between five slats that will make up one side. Note: The reason for cutting the spacers 13}/2 in. long is so they are ready to use again when installing the bottom slats. Be sure the ends of the slats are flush. Position two long cleats flush with the top and bottom edges of the slats, and double-check that the cleats are Vi in. short at each end. Drill countersunk pilot holes for attaching the cleats to the slats. Drive IVi-in. flathead wood screws through the cleats into the slats (See Photo A). Repeat this process to build the other panel.

Assemble the bench structure

0 Fasten the front and back panels together. Set the short cleats between the front and back panels so the ends of the short cleats fit into the Vi-in. notches formed by the long cleats and front and back panels. The top and bottom edges of the long and short cleats are flush. Drill a countersunk pilot hole at each end of the short cleats, and drive lV2-in. screws through the short cleats into the ends of the long cleats.

O Make the bottom slats. Rip four 6-ft.-long 1-in.-wide strips from the 6-ft. cedar 1 x 6. Crosscut the 20 slats to length with a miter saw or radial arm saw.

0 Attach the bottom slats. Position the bottom slats evenly along the bottom of the bench on top of the long and short cleats, using the V2-in. spacers you made in Step 2 to space the slats. Fasten the slats with a pneumatic nail gun or with lV4-in. finish nails and a hammer (See Photo B).

PHOTO A: Assemble the front and back panels by attaching pairs of long cleats to groups of five slats. Use spacers between the slats to hold them apart V2 in. Attach the cleats to the spacers with countersunk screws.

PHOTO B: Nail the cedar bottom slats to the top edges of the long and short cleats to form the bench bottom. Separate the slats with V2-in.-thick spacers as you fasten the slats in place.

PHOTO C: Flatten the edges of the workpieces that will make up the side panels on the jointer or with a hand plane. Unless the boards are perfectly flat, gaps will show when you glue up the side panels.

PHOTO D: Glue and clamp up two side panels, alternating the clamps top and bottom to distribute clamping pressure. If the boards are cut longer than necessary, don't worry if the ends don't align at this stage

Attaching Bench Slats

PHOTO E: Set the side panels into position on the short cleats, so the front edges of the sides overhang the bench front by V4 in. and the tops of the sides are flush with the top cleats. Screw through the short cleats to attach the sides to the bench.

PHOTO C: Flatten the edges of the workpieces that will make up the side panels on the jointer or with a hand plane. Unless the boards are perfectly flat, gaps will show when you glue up the side panels.

Make the sides

To get the width needed for the side panels, you'll need to edge-glue narrower stock. The 6-ft.-long, 5/4 oak boards specified in the Shopping List are for this purpose. In general, attractive glued-up panels take a little planning. When selecting stock, look for similar color and grain pattern, or else plan the joint lines to highlight natural differences in the wood as a decorative element, by placing a darker or tighter grained piece between two equally sized lighter pieces. Always make sure that the glued-up panel is at least V2 in. longer and wider than the finished piece you need, so you can trim it final size. You may want to trim the panel some on both sides to balance the wood grain pattern.

O Cut pieces for the side panels to rough length (V2 to 1 in. longer than final length), then flatten the edges on a jointer (See Photo C). You could also smooth the edges with a hand plane.

O Glue up the side panels. Spread wood glue along the mating edges of the boards, and clamp the boards together (See Photo D). Alternate the clamps above and below the panels to prevent bowing, and don't overtighten the clamps or you'll squeeze out too much glue. It is best not to wipe up the excess glue while it's wet, because it will clog the pores of the surrounding wood and show up dramatically when the

PHOTO E: Set the side panels into position on the short cleats, so the front edges of the sides overhang the bench front by V4 in. and the tops of the sides are flush with the top cleats. Screw through the short cleats to attach the sides to the bench.

PHOTO D: Glue and clamp up two side panels, alternating the clamps top and bottom to distribute clamping pressure. If the boards are cut longer than necessary, don't worry if the ends don't align at this stage

PHOTO F: Cut the back supports, back rest and seat to shape, using the detail drawings on page 49 as a guide for establishing the profiles.

piece is stained. Leave lines of squeezed-out glue until they partially dry, then slice them off cleanly with a sharp chisel. When the panels are dry, sand the joints smooth.

O Cut the two sides to 15V4 in. long and 15V2 in. wide. Use the Ends drawing, page 49, to mark the V-shaped profile on the bottoms of the side panels, and cut out the profiles with a jig saw.

O Attach the sides to the bench structure. To do this, you'll screw from inside the bench through the short cleats. Extend the side panels V4 in. beyond the front of the bench. Fasten through the upper short cleats first, keeping the top edges of the side panels flush with the top edges of the cleats. Drill countersunk pilot holes, and attach the parts with lWin. flathead wood screws. Then fasten the lower short cleats to the sides (See Photo E).

Make & install the back rest & seat

© Make the back supports. Cut the blanks to size from 6-in.-wide 5/4 oak stock. Refer to the Back Supports drawing, page 49, for laying out the shape of the back supports on your workpieces. Cut out the parts and sand the cut edges smooth.

(B Make the back rest. Cut the blank to length, mark the sloped profile using the Back Rest drawing on page 49 and cut out the part with a jig saw.

PHOTO G: Insert thin spacers between the fixed seat slat and the seat to provide for hinge clearance. Clamp the parts and install the hinge.

© Cut the fixed seat slat to length, using the piece of 3-in.-wide, 5A oak stock specified in the Shopping List, page 47.

© Make the seat. Cut, edge-joint and glue up stock for a seat blank. Mark the angled profile on the front edge of the seat. Clamp the seat to your worksurface, and cut out the final shape with a jig saw (See Photo F). Sand the cut edges smooth.

(D Install the piano hinge. Position the fixed seat slat face down along the back edge of the seat. Cut spacers that match the combined thickness of the two hinge leaves, and insert the spacers between the seat and the slat. Clamp the slat and seat together with their ends flush. Center the hinge so the hinge knuckle aligns with the spacers, drill pilot holes and attach the hinge to the slat and seat with screws (See Photo G).

© Attach the seat assembly to the bench. Position the seat assembly on the bench structure with the back edge of the fixed seat slat flush with the back of the bench. The ends of the seat assembly should overhang the bench sides by l3/4 in. On the seat slat, mark the locations where the back supports will overlap. Drill countersunk pilot holes in these areas. Fasten the seat assembly to the bench by screwing through the fixed slat down into the upper back long cleat and the ends of the back slats (See Photo H).

PHOTO H: Fasten the seat assembly to the bench, driving countersunk wood screws in the areas on the fixed seat slat that will be covered by the back supports. Screw into the upper long cleats and back slats.

PHOTO I: Set the back rest assembly into place, and install it with 2-in. flathead wood screws driven through the back slats and Into the back supports. Measure carefully when establishing screw locations.

© Assemble the back rest. Measure in from the ends of the back rest and draw guidelines on the face at 35/s in. Clamp the back rest into the top notches of the back supports, with the supports centered on these guidelines. Drill countersunk pilot holes through the back rest and into the supports. Counterbore the holes Va in. to accommodate wood plugs. Screw the back rest to the supports.

® Attach the back rest assembly to the bench. Clamp the assembly in place, drill countersunk pilot holes through the back slats into the supports, and fasten the parts with 2-in. flathead wood screws (See Photo I).

Finishing touches

© Plug the screw holes. Use a plug cutter to cut 3/s-in. oak plugs, apply glue, and tap the plugs into place with a wooden mallet. You could use wood filler or dowel pieces instead of wood plugs, if you prefer. Trim the plugs flush and sand smooth (See Photo J).

(D Sand all surfaces, edges and corners well. Stain the bench as you like, and topcoat with sealer or varnish.

PHOTO I: Set the back rest assembly into place, and install it with 2-in. flathead wood screws driven through the back slats and Into the back supports. Measure carefully when establishing screw locations.

PHOTO J: Install wood plugs or use an oak-tinted wood filler to cover screws used to attach the back rest to the back supports. Generally, wood plugs are easier to conceal because they blend in better with the surrounding wood surfaces. Trim the plugs with a flush-cutting saw (if necessary), and sand these areas thoroughly.

PHOTO J: Install wood plugs or use an oak-tinted wood filler to cover screws used to attach the back rest to the back supports. Generally, wood plugs are easier to conceal because they blend in better with the surrounding wood surfaces. Trim the plugs with a flush-cutting saw (if necessary), and sand these areas thoroughly.

Breezeway Benches

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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  • Stig
    How to make breezeway bench?
    8 years ago

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