Patio Table Chairs Stepbystep

PHOTO B: Build an upper and lower frame for each chair. Note that the end pieces of each frame are Inset 3/s in. and 3Vs in. from the ends of the side pieces. Clamp the frame parts together, and drive 2-in. galvanized deck screws through the sides and into the ends to make the frames.

PHOTO A: Lay out and cut eight back chair legs to shape. Use the Back Legs drawing, page 25, to establish reference points for drawing the leg shapes. Connect the points with a straightedge.

Build the chairs

Since you're building four identical chairs, cut parts for all the chairs and build them simultaneously. In this situation, make sure your measurements are accurate before cutting all the pieces.

O Make the back legs. Cut blanks to length from 2x8 stock, and lay out the legs (See Photo A) following the measurements in the Back Legs drawing, page 25. Cut out the back legs with a jig saw. After cutting the legs to shape, chamfer the top and bottom ends of the legs, using a router table with a piloted chamfering bit set to 3/8 in.

© Build the upper and lower seat frames. The construction of both frames is identical, but the width of the parts is different. Cut the upper and lower side and end pieces to size for both frames. Rout 3/8-in. chamfers along the outside ends of the side pieces. Clamp each frame together using the Top View: Seat Frames drawing, page 25, as a guide for positioning the parts. Drill countersunk pilot holes through the sides, and fasten the frames together with 2-in. galvanized deck screws (See Photo B).

© Make the front legs. Cut the legs to length from 2x4 stock, and chamfer all four edges of the bottom ends of each leg.

PHOTO A: Lay out and cut eight back chair legs to shape. Use the Back Legs drawing, page 25, to establish reference points for drawing the leg shapes. Connect the points with a straightedge.

PHOTO B: Build an upper and lower frame for each chair. Note that the end pieces of each frame are Inset 3/s in. and 3Vs in. from the ends of the side pieces. Clamp the frame parts together, and drive 2-in. galvanized deck screws through the sides and into the ends to make the frames.

O Screw the legs and frames together. Attach the frames to the back legs first, with the top edge of the upper frame I6V2 in. above the leg bottom. Place the bottom frame 4 in. from the leg bottom. Then clamp the front legs in position inside the front corners of both frames, and fasten with galvanized deck screws (See Photo C).

0 Make the slats. All the slats are the same length and shape, but the position of the attachment screws is different between the back slats and the seat slats. Cut the slats to length from 1x4 stock, and chamfer all four edges of one side. Designate 12 slats (three per chair) as back slats, and mark centerlines for the attachment screws. These back slats will attach to the back legs. Next, measure and mark centerlines for the attachment screws in the seat slats. These slats fasten to the upper frame sides. Drill countersunk pilot holes along the lines in all the slats, two screws per joint.

© Attach the slats. Align the top edge of the uppermost back slat as shown in the Front and Side View drawings, page 25, and leave IV4-in. spaces between the slats. Leave Vfc-in. spaces between the seat slats, with the rear seat slat held tight against the back legs. Fasten the slats with countersunk galvanized deck screws (See Photo D).

Build the table

All visible corners and ends of the table legs, aprons and slats are chamfered. Although you can use a handheld router and a piloted chamfering bit, a router table makes the task quicker and easier. Chamfers for all parts are cut at the same 3/8-in. height setting.

PHOTO C: Attach the upper and lower frames to the back and front legs with countersunk screws.
PHOTO D: To create uniform slat spacing, use a V2-in. spacer for positioning the seat slats and a lV4-in. spacer for the back slats. Start the back slats at the bottom of the back leg angle. Install the seat slats so the back seat slat butts against the back legs.

PHOTO E: Miter-cut the ends of the leg braces and table aprons to 45°. The safest way to make these cuts, particularly on the short leg braces, is to use a power miter saw or table saw rather than a circular saw.

Dovetailed Chair Braces

PHOTO G: Assemble the table legs, aprons and corner braces. Attach the parts by driving 2V2-in. galvanized deck screws through countersunk pilot holes in the leg braces. Fasten the brace to each apron with a pair of screws driven in at an angle into the aprons, and use four screws for securing the leg. Be sure the legs are tight against the aprons and braces as you drive the screws.

PHOTO F: The bottom edge and both ends of each apron piece are chamfered. Make these cuts at the router table, using a piloted chamfering bit set to a height of 3/8 in.

O Make the legs. Cut the legs to length from 4x4 stock. Chamfer all four long edges and the edges of the leg bottoms.

0 Make the aprons and braces. Cut the aprons and braces to length, and miter-cut the ends at 45° (See Photo E). When miter-ing these parts, use extra care to cut accurately.

© Chamfer one edge and both ends on one face of each apron (See Photo F). Since the apron ends are mitered, there is less surface to guide against the router table fence when chamfering. One solution is to clamp the aprons together with the ends flush and rout all the ends in one pass. Note: If you are using a handheld router, the mitered ends don't provide a surface for the chamfer bit bearing to guide against. Clamp the aprons together on your worksurface, with the ends flush. Position and clamp a straightedge across the aprons to use as a guide for the router base before making the cuts.

© Assemble the table legs, aprons and braces. First drill six countersunk pilot holes in the braces—four holes for attaching the leg and two holes angled at each end for the aprons, as shown in the Top View: Corner Detail drawing, page 25. Stand the legs upside down on the floor or your worksurface, position the aprons and braces around each leg, and attach the parts with galvanized deck screws (See Photo G).

© Make the nine top slats. Cut the slats to length, and rip them to width on the table saw (See Photo H). Chamfer the outer edge of the two end slats on your router table. Chamfer the top edges of the ends of the slats.

Drill pilot holes in the slats. Lay a slat across the table structure, with an equal overhang on both ends. Mark the centerpoint of the aprons on the edge of the slat and transfer these marks to the face of the slat. Use this first slat as a guide to mark screw locations on all the slats. Drill countersunk pilot holes along the guidelines on all the slats, two holes per joint.

i Attach the slats. Determine the centerline of the table and install the center slat over this line. Use two 3/i6-in.-thick spacers to establish the slat gaps. Install slats out from the center slat, fastening each with galvanized deck screws (See Photo I).

Finishing touches © Sand the table and chairs well to smooth the surfaces and edges. Make sure all screws are countersunk below the surface of the wood.

Apply a clear UV protectant sealer or leave unfinished to weather naturally to gray.

PHOTO H: Rip-cut 2x6 stock down to a width of 5V8 in. to form the tabletop slats. You could make these cuts with a circular saw and straightedge guide, but a better choice is to use the table saw and rip fence. Support workpieces with a roller stand as they leave the saw table.
2x6 Table Top

PHOTO I: Attach the top slats to the aprons with 2V2-in. deck screws. Fasten the center slat first, then work outward. This way, the overhang will be consistent on both ends of the table, and the slats will be evenly positioned. Use a pair of 3/ie-in. spacers to create uniform gaps between the slats.

PHOTO I: Attach the top slats to the aprons with 2V2-in. deck screws. Fasten the center slat first, then work outward. This way, the overhang will be consistent on both ends of the table, and the slats will be evenly positioned. Use a pair of 3/ie-in. spacers to create uniform gaps between the slats.

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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