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PHOTO A: Lay out and cut a template for making the sides of the railing planter, then use this template to draw the shapes on the side workpieces. Cut out the shapes with a jig saw.

Cedar lumber is typically sold with one side rough and one side smooth. This feature provides you the opportunity to choose which surface to emphasize in the finished planters. For these planters, we held the rough side out because we wanted a casual, rustic look. If you prefer, you can achieve a more refined look simply by building your planters with the smooth surface out. If you intend to paint your finished planters, we recommend building with the smooth side out.

RAILING PLANTER

Cut out the parts

O Make a template for marking the two side profiles. Cut a piece of hardboard or stiff cardboard to size, llA in. by 35V4 in., for use as a pattern. Following the Railing Planter drawing on page 91, mark the angles on the ends and the curved cutout profile on the bottom edge. Cut the template to shape with a jig saw and sand the cuts smooth.

0 Trace the profile from the template onto the side workpieces.

0 Cut out the sides. Clamp the blanks securely to your workbench and cut the profiles with your jig saw (See Photo A).

O Cut the ends and bottom to size, according to the dimensions in the Cutting List on page 90.

Assemble the planter

©Attach the ends to the bottom. The bottom is sloped to route seepage water away from your deck railing cap. Refer to the Side View drawing, page 91, and mark the slope of the bottom piece on the inside faces of the ends. Drill pilot holes in the ends. Clamp the bottom in place between the ends, and attach the parts with 2-in. galvanized finish nails (See Photo B).

0 Attach the sides. Lay the end/bottom assembly on your workbench. Center the first side piece on the assembly left-to-right with all top edges flush. Clamp it in place. Note that the lower edges of the end pieces are 3/4 in. above the lower edges of the sides; this allows the planter to rest on the railing cap while the sides overlap it for stability. Attach the side by driving galvanized finish nails through the side into the ends and the bottom. Use a nailset to recess the nailheads. Follow the same procedure to position and attach the remaining side.

O Drill the weep holes. Clamp the assembled planter to your worksurface with the deeper side of the compartment facing up. Drill three angled V4-in.-dia. weep holes through the side of the planter into the deepest corner of

PHOTO B: Mark the slope of the bottom piece on the planter end pieces, then attach the ends to the bottom with galvanized finish nails. Clamp the pieces to help hold them steady during assembly.

the compartment (See Photo C). Position the weep holes so they are just above the bottom piece inside the planter.

PHOTO C: Fasten the planter sides to the ends and bottom with nails, then drill three angled Vi-in.-dia. weep holes through the side where the bottom of the planter slopes to its lowest point.

DECK PLANTER

Make the side panels

Each side panel is composed of three boards, which are held together during the construction process by a temporary cleat.

O Cut six pieces of 1 x 8 cedar to 14V2 in. long (you'll need three pieces for each side).

© Cut two temporary cleats (not shown on the Cutting List) 13V2 in. long from scrap wood.

©Build the sides. Lay groups of three boards facedown on your workbench in two groups. Center a temporary cleat left-to-right along the top edge of each group of

PHOTO D: Assemble two blanks for the deck planter sides using three lengths of 1 - 8 cedar per blank, fastened together with a temporary cleat. Mark the profiles on the side pieces with a template, then cut the sides to shape. You'll remove the temporary cleats later

Temporary cleat

Temporary cleat la

PHOTO E: Clamp pairs of 6-in.-wide boards for the end panels and fasten each panel together with a cleat. Use lV4-in. galvanized screws to join the parts. These two cleats are permanent parts of the planter.
PHOTO F: Cut the bottom piece to size, drill five weep holes through the bottom for drainage, and fasten it to the cleats on the end pieces with countersunk screws. Attach the bottom so it will rest on the cleats when the planter is finished.

boards, and fasten each panel together by driving lV4-in. wood screws through the cleat into the boards.

© Make a template for marking the profiles of the two sides. Cut a piece of hardboard or stiff cardboard 14V4 in. wide by 201/2 in. long. Following the Deck Planter drawing on page 91, mark the angles on the ends and the shape of the curved cutout along the bottom edge. Cut the template to shape with a jig saw and sand the cut edges smooth.

© Trace the profile from the template onto the side panels. Draw on the face of the panels that does not have the cleats. Clamp each panel securely to your workbench and cut the parts with a jig saw (See Photo D).

Make the ends & bottom

The end panels are each composed of two boards fastened together with a permanent cleat.

© Rip a 4-ft., 1-in. length of 1 x 8 cedar to 6 in. wide. Cut the ripped board into four 12-in. lengths. Lay each pair of boards facedown on your workbench and clamp them together with the ends flush.

© Cut two pieces of scrap left over from Step 6 to 7/8 x 7/8 x 12 in. to form two cleats. Drill countersunk pilot holes in the cleats.

© Assemble the end panels by positioning a cleat flush with the bottom edges of each pair of boards and fastening the parts with iVi-in. galvanized deck screws, screwing through the cleats into the end panels (See Photo E).

© Cut the bottom to size from 3/4-in. exterior plywood. Draw intersecting lines from corner to corner to use as a guide for locating and drilling five V2-in.-dia. weep holes.

Assemble the planter

© Attach the end panels to the bottom. Clamp the bottom in place between the ends so it will rest on top of the cleats when the planter is right-side-up. Drill through the cleats from below to fasten the bottom (See Photo F).

©Attach the sides. Position the first side panel on the end/bottom assembly so it is centered left-to-right and the top edges are all flush. Drive 2-in. galvanized finish nails through the side panel into the ends and the bottom, using a nailset to drive the nails below the surface of the wood. Attach the remaining side in the same fashion (See Photo G).

© Unscrew and remove the temporary cleats from the side panels.

© Cut the four crown pieces. Rip cedar stock to 2 in. wide. Measure your planter to verify the length of the crown pieces. The inside edges of the crown should sit flush with the inside of the planter when installed. Cut the pieces to length with the ends mitered at 45°.

© Attach the crown pieces to the planter with finish nails (See Photo H).

Finishing touches for both planters

© Break all edges with sandpaper and check that all nailheads are set. You may choose to leave the planters unfinished, apply the same finish as you have on your deck, or topcoat with paint.

PHOTO G: Fasten the sides to the end/bottom assembly by nailing through the sides and into the ends and bottom. Drill pilot holes before you drive the nails to keep the cedar from splitting. Once both sides are attached, remove the temporary cleats.
PHOTO H: Install the four crown pieces around the top of the planter with nails. Lay out and cut the crown pieces so they are mitered on the ends and fit flush with the inside of the planter.

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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