Sun Lounger Stepbystep

PHOTO A: Cut notches in the seat rails for back rest and foot rest dowels by boring l-in.-dia. holes in the rails first, then cutting through the rails to the holes to form the notches. The foot rest notch (shown) is angled 45° on the seat rail, while the back rest notches are perpendicular.

PHOTO B: Fasten the leg assemblies to the seat rails with 2V2-in. galvanized deck screws. Be sure the foot rest notches on the seat rails face down on your worksurface when you fasten the legs to the rails. Check the leg assemblies with a square to be sure they are perpendicular to the rails before driving the screws.

The lounge chair is made up of three sections: a stationary seat, an adjustable back rest and an adjustable foot rest. The seat section provides the basic structure and is built first. All the parts, except for the dowels, are made from cedar 2 x 4s.

Shape the seat rails

O Crosscut the long seat rails to length. Draw a l3/4-in. radius on both ends of each rail. Find the centerpoint of each radius by using a combination square and marking a 45° line from both corners at each end. Position your compass at the intersection of these lines and draw the radius. Cut out the curves with a jig saw, and sand the cut edges smooth.

© Cut notches for the foot rest dowel and the back rest dowel. The notches are made by first boring lVs-in.-dia. holes, then cutting a slot from these holes to the top edge of each rail. Start with the foot rest dowel notches. Using the centerpoint you established on the ends of the rails in Step 1, bore a lV8-in.-dia. hole. Draw two 45° lines to connect the hole to the top corner of the rails. Cut along these lines to form the foot rest notches (See Photo A). Form the back rest notches by measuring 31V2 in. from the ends of the rails opposite the foot rest notches. The center-

PHOTO A: Cut notches in the seat rails for back rest and foot rest dowels by boring l-in.-dia. holes in the rails first, then cutting through the rails to the holes to form the notches. The foot rest notch (shown) is angled 45° on the seat rail, while the back rest notches are perpendicular.

PHOTO B: Fasten the leg assemblies to the seat rails with 2V2-in. galvanized deck screws. Be sure the foot rest notches on the seat rails face down on your worksurface when you fasten the legs to the rails. Check the leg assemblies with a square to be sure they are perpendicular to the rails before driving the screws.

point for the lVs-in.-dia. hole is 15/i6 in. from the top edge of the rails. Drill the holes, then form the notches by drawing a pair of lines from each hole perpendicular to the top edge of the rails. Cut along the lines to form the two notches.

Build & attach the leg assemblies to the seat rails

© Cut the six legs to length. Draw and cut l3/4-in. radiuses on both ends of the two foot rest legs and on one end of the four seat section legs.

O Cut the seat stretchers to length. Mark the stretcher locations on the inside faces of the four seat section legs. Center the stretchers on the width of the legs. The top edges of the stretchers are 3V2 in. down from the square ends of the legs. Clamp the parts together and fasten the legs to the seat stretchers with countersunk 3-in. galvanized deck screws.

0 Attach the leg assemblies to the seat rails. Fasten one leg assembly 6V2 in. from the ends of the rails with the foot rest notches using 2V2-in. deck screws. Attach the second leg assembly so the span between the outside faces of the seat stretchers is 46 in. (See Photo B).

Install the back supports

O Measure and cut the two back supports to length.

© Rout the three back rest grooves in each back support. Refer to the measurements on the Back Supports drawing, page 117, to determine the groove locations. Clamp the back supports side by side so you can mark and gangcut slots on both supports at one time. Then rout the grooves with a 3/4-in. core box bit. Cut the slots in multiple passes to keep from overloading the router bit (See Photo C).

O Attach the back supports to the tops of the seat stretchers. Leave a 4V2-in. space between the supports and the legs (See Head End, View, page 117) to allow ample room for the back rails and adjustment braces. Align the ends of the back supports so they are flush with the outside faces of the seat stretchers. Drill pilot holes, and fasten the parts with 3-in. galvanized deck screws (See Photo D).

PHOTO C: Gang-rout notches in the back supports to ensure that the notches will line up perfectly on both pieces. Use a 3/4-in. core box bit, and cut the notches In several passes of increasing depth. We clamped a short T-square style straightedge jig to guide the router when cutting.

PHOTO D: Fasten the back supports to the seat stretchers. Leave 4V2-in. spaces between the back supports and the legs to provide clearance for the chair back rails and adjustment braces.

PHOTO E: Cut the 19 seat slats to length, and ease the top edges and ends of each slat with a V2-in, roundover bit in the router. We used a plywood jig clamped to the benchtop to "frame" each slat on all sides and hold it steady while routing. This way, the slats require no further clamping.

PHOTO C: Gang-rout notches in the back supports to ensure that the notches will line up perfectly on both pieces. Use a 3/4-in. core box bit, and cut the notches In several passes of increasing depth. We clamped a short T-square style straightedge jig to guide the router when cutting.

PHOTO D: Fasten the back supports to the seat stretchers. Leave 4V2-in. spaces between the back supports and the legs to provide clearance for the chair back rails and adjustment braces.

PHOTO E: Cut the 19 seat slats to length, and ease the top edges and ends of each slat with a V2-in, roundover bit in the router. We used a plywood jig clamped to the benchtop to "frame" each slat on all sides and hold it steady while routing. This way, the slats require no further clamping.

PHOTO F: Screw the five seat slats to the seat rails. Determine and mark the positions of the end slats first, then space the remaining three slats evenly between the end slats. If the slat space is consistent on your chair, use a scrap spacer to make spacing easy when fastening the parts.
PHOTO G: Bore a 1-in-dia. hole through each back rail for the back rest dowel and a 3/8-in.-deep counterbore for the heads and washers of the adjustment brace pivot bolts.

Cut & attach the slats

O Cut all the slats to length. Cut one slat 3V4 in. shorter than the others so it can fit between the seat rails when the back rest is inclined.

CD Rout a V2-in. roundover on the face edges of the slats. We made a plywood jig and clamped it to our worksurface to hold each slat steady for routing (See Photo E).

© Attach the five slats that make up the fixed seat of the chair to the seat rails. First mark the positions of the two end slats. Locate the edge of the slat closest to the foot rest notch by measuring 1% in. from the foot end of the seat rails and marking a line. Then measure 19V2 in. from this line to locate the edge closest to the back rest notch. Space the remaining three slats evenly between the end slats. Note: The spacing between the slats will vary, depending upon the width of your slat stock. What is most important is that all the slats fit between the marks you've just drawn on the seat rails. Fasten the slats to the rails with 21/2-in. deck screws (See Photo F).

Build the back rest

Rip and crosscut the two adjustment braces to size, and cut 3/4-in. radiuses on both ends of each part. Drill one end for a 3/8-in.-dia. pivot bolt and the other end for the 3A-in.-dia. adjustment dowel. Bore the holes at the centerpoints you established for marking the end radiuses.

® Cut the back rails to length, then miter-cut one end at a 60° angle. Cut a l3A-in. radius on one corner of the other end of the rails with a jig saw as shown in the Back Rails drawing, page 117.

PHOTO H: Drill 3/s-in.-dia. holes through the back rails, centered on the l-in.-dia. counterbore holes. These holes will house pivot bolts for the adjustment brace that supports the chair back and holds it in one of three positions.

© Bore holes in the back rails for the back rest dowel and adjustment brace pivot bolts. Refer to the Back Rails drawing, page 117, for locating these hole positions. Clamp each rail to your worksur-face. Bore a l-in.-dia. hole through the radiused ends of the rails for the back rest dowel. Using the same bit, drill a 3/8-in.-deep counterbore for the pivot bolt head and washer (See Photo G).

© Drill a 3/s-in.-dia. hole through the back rails for the adjustment brace pivot bolts in the center of the counterbores you drilled in Step 14 (See Photo H).

© Install the adjustment dowel in the adjustment braces. Cut the 3/4-in.-dia. dowel to length, and fasten the dowel into the holes in the adjustment braces with 4d galvanized finish nails.

(D Attach the slats to the back rails. On the seven full-length slats, drill a line of countersunk pilot holes 4V4 in. from each end. On the short slat, drill the pilot holes lVs in. from each end. Attach the end slats first. Align the short slat so it is even with the radiused ends of the back rails, and overhang the upper slat V2 in. beyond the angled ends. Make sure these two slats are square with the rails and that the inside faces of the rails are 14 in. apart. Screw these first two slats in place. Then space and attach the six intermediate slats evenly between the end slats.

© Cut the l-in.-dia. back rest dowel to length. Slide it through the holes in the back rails, overhang the ends evenly and fasten the dowel in place with a 6d galvanized nail at each end (See Photo D. Drill pilot holes to keep the nails from splitting the dowels.

PHOTO I: Tack the back rest dowel in place on the back rest rails with #6d galvanized finish nails, Drive the nails through the rails and into the dowels. To keep the dowels from splitting, drill a pilot hole for the nails first.

PHOTO J: Install the adjustment brace to the back rest with bolts, washers and nuts. Place a washer on either side of each adjustment brace. Thread two nuts on each bolt and tighten the nuts against one another to lock them together, yet allow the adjustment brace to swing freely.
PHOTO K: Cut l3/4-in. radiuses on either end of a section of 2 x 4 cedar. Cut off these curved ends with a power miter saw or radial-arm saw.The pieces will serve as leg stops on the foot rest. Cutting short workpieces from longer stock keeps your hands a safe distance from the blade.

(3D Secure the adjustment brace assembly to the back rest rails with bolts, washers and double nuts (See Photo J). Leave enough play when tightening the nuts against one another so the brace assembly swings freely.

Assemble the foot rest

© Cut the foot rest rails to length, then round off both ends with l3/4-in. radiuses.

© Bore holes through the foot rest rails for the foot rest dowel and the leg pivot bolts. Locate the centerpoints for the holes using the Foot Rest Rails drawing, page 117. Drill a l-in.-dia. hole through one end for the foot rest dowel. Using the same bit, drill a 3/8-in.-deep counterbore in the other end for the pivot bolt head and washer.

® Make and attach the two leg stops. Cut l3/4-in. radiuses on both ends of a piece of 2 x 4 cedar scrap, then cut off these two semicircles (See Photo K). Fasten the leg stops to the pivot bolt ends of the foot rest rails with screws.

© Drill the 3/8-in.-dia. holes for the pivot bolts. Clamp a foot rest leg in place beneath a rail on your work-surface. Drill a 3/8-in.-dia. hole through the center of the counter-bore in the rail and through the leg (See Photo L). Repeat the process for the other rail and leg.

© Cut the foot rest stretcher to length and fasten it to the legs. Center the stretcher on the width of the legs, and position the bottom edge 6 in. from the bottoms of the legs. Drill countersunk pilot holes and fasten the parts with 2V2-in. galvanized deck screws.

© Attach six slats to the foot rest rails. Drill countersunk pilot holes

PHOTO L: Drill holes through the foot rest rails and the legs. The parts will attach with bolts so the legs can pivot on the rails.

2V4 in. from each end of the slats. Attach the end slats first. Locate one slat l3/4 in. from the leg ends of the short rails. Set the other end slat 2V4 in. from the dowel-hole ends of the rails. Make sure the framework is square. Then fasten the intermediate slats evenly between the end slats.

© Cut and attach the foot rest dowel to the rails with 6d finish nails. The dowel should overhang the rails evenly on both sides.

© Attach the leg assembly to the foot rest rails with 3/8-in.-dia. bolts, washers and double nuts (See Photo M).

Finishing touches

© Ease all chair edges thoroughly with sandpaper (See Photo N). Stain and/or seal as desired. We applied a clear exterior sealer to highlight the beauty of the cedar, but this project could be stained, painted or left unfinished.

PHOTO M: Attach the foot rest stretcher to the legs with 2V2-in. deck screws, then join the leg assembly to the foot rest with bolts, washers and double nuts.
PHOTO N: Set the back and foot rests in place on the seat, and test the action of the parts. Then sand all exposed surfaces of the chair with medium-grit sandpaper. If you sand in an enclosed place, wear a particle mask. Cedar dust can be irritating to your nose and lungs.

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