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Tedswoodworking Plans

16.000 Woodworking Plans by Ted McGrath

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Build the box

The cart box is constructed of 3/4-in. exterior plywood, which resists delaminating when exposed to moisture. The front of the box is angled for easy dumping, and the bottom is reinforced with three recessed 2x4 struts.

O Cut the box sides, back, front and bottom pieces to the sizes given in the Cutting List, page

134. Use a circular saw or jig saw guided against a clamped straightedge to cut the parts. Lay out all the parts on the plywood sheet before cutting any workpieces to ensure that you will cut the sheet efficiently and minimize waste.

0 Mark and cut the four notches for tool handles in the top edge of the back piece. Refer to the Notches in Back drawing, page

135, for spacing the notches. Cut out the notches with your jig saw (See Photo A).

O Cut the three struts to length and attach them to the bottom piece. Position the front strut 1V2 in. back from the front edge of the bottom, the center strut 6V2 in. away from the front strut, and the rear strut flush with the back edge of the bottom. Apply moisture-resistant wood glue to the struts, drill countersunk pilot holes through the bottom, and fasten

PHOTO A: Lay out and draw four 2-in.-dia. semicircular tool notches in the top edge of the cart back. Cut out the notches with a jig saw. Clamp the workpiece to your bench to hold it steady while you make the notched cuts.
PHOTO B: Cut and install the three struts to the cart bottom with moisture-resistant wood glue and 2-in. galvanized deck screws. For maximum strength, use at least six screws to fasten each strut to the bottom panel.
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PHOTO C: Build the cart box. Fasten the cart back to the bottom, then screw the sides to the back and bottom. Install the cart front last. Strengthen the joints with glue when you attach the parts.

the struts with l5/s-in. screws (See Photo B).

O Lay out and cut the angled front ends of the side pieces. Make a mark along the bottom edge of each side piece 6V4 in. from one end. Draw a straight line from these marks to the corner of the top edge. Cut along these angled lines.

© Bevel-cut the top edge of the front piece. Set the base of your circular saw to 22V20, and trim along the top edge so it will be flush when fastened between the angled front edges of the sides. The bottom edge will be hidden, so there's no need to bevel-cut it to match.

© Bevel-cut the front edge of the bottom piece.

© Assemble the box with glue and l5/8-in. galvanized deck screws. Drill countersunk pilot holes in the sides, front and back. First, attach the back to the bottom, driving screws through the back and into the back strut. Next, attach the sides to the bottom and the back (See Photo C). Align the bottoms of the sides with the bottoms of the struts. The back edges of the sides overlap the back. Finally, attach the front to the bottom and sides, making sure that the angled edge is flush with the top edges of the sides.

PHOTO D: Mark and cut the grip profiles on the handles. Ease the sharp edges on the grips by rounding them over with a router and V2-in. roundover bit.

Attach the handles, legs & crosspiece

The handles, legs and crosspiece are made of treated lumber. When handling chemically-treated lumber, it is a good idea to protect your skin by wearing work gloves. Also, work in a well-ventilated area when cutting this wood.

© Cut the handles to length from 2x4 stock.

© Shape the grips on the handles. Following the Side View drawing, page 135, mark the grip profiles and cut the shapes with your jig saw. Use your router with a V2-in. roundover bit to ease the sharp edges on the grips (See Photo D). This step can also be done with a rasp and sandpaper, or a handheld belt sander if you don't have a router.

<D Position and attach the handles. Mark the location of the handles on the box sides by measuring from the back corner up 11 in. and forward 30V2 in. Draw a straight line between these points on both sides. Drill a line of pilot holes 13A in. down from these lines, and countersink the holes from inside the box. Position the handles so the top edges align with the diagonal marks on the cart. Apply moisture-resistant wood glue, clamp the first handle in place, and attach the

PHOTO E: Mark the locations of the handles on the cart box, and install the handles with moisture-resistant wood glue and 2-in. galvanized deck screws. Clamp the handles in place as you attach them.

PHOTO F: Clamp the crosspiece in position between the handles, drill countersunk pilot holes through the parts, and fasten the crosspiece to the handles with 3-in. galvanized deck screws.

PHOTO E: Mark the locations of the handles on the cart box, and install the handles with moisture-resistant wood glue and 2-in. galvanized deck screws. Clamp the handles in place as you attach them.

handle with 2-in. screws. Flip the box over, and clamp and attach the second handle (See Photo E).

© Cut the legs to length, then cut the bottom ends of the legs at a 20° angle. Position the legs on the cart sides so the top ends of the legs rest against the bottom edges of the handles, and the back edges of the legs align with the bottom back corners of the back struts. Fasten the legs with glue and screws.

© Cut and attach the crosspiece. Cut the crosspiece to length. Mark the tool-handle notches by aligning the crosspiece flush with the top edge of the cart back and tracing the profile. Cut the notches with a jig saw. Clamp the crosspiece in position, 12 in. from the upper ends of the handles. Drill countersunk pilot holes, and screw the crosspiece in place with 3-in. galvanized deck screws (See Photo F).

Install the wheels

Wheels can be purchased in a variety of sizes. Keep in mind that wheel diameter will affect the overall height of the cart and the length of the legs. The legs should be short enough so that the cart leans back slightly when at rest; this ensures that the legs won't be snagging on the ground as you go over bumps or down hills. Also, larger wheels will navigate uneven ground much more smoothly than will small wheels. We found 14-in. wheels to be a convenient size and readily available at our local building center.

© Locate and drill the axle holes. Mark 45° lines from the bottom corners of the handles using a combination square. Drill V2-in.-dia. axle holes through the handles where the lines intersect. Note: Be sure the holes clear the bottom of the center stretcher, especially if you've modified the position of the handle, based on the wheels you are using for the cart (See Photo G).

©Cut the axle rod to length. If your wheel hubs are 1V2 in. thick, as ours were, the correct axle length will be 34V2 in. If the hubs of your wheels are thicker or thinner, you will need to adjust the axle length accordingly. The axle needs to extend beyond the cart on each side 3A in. plus the thickness of the hub to accommodate the washers and cotter pins.

© Drill holes through the axle for the cotter pins. Make a wooden cradle by cutting a groove into the face of an 8- to 12-in. piece of 2 x 4 with two passes of

PHOTO F: Clamp the crosspiece in position between the handles, drill countersunk pilot holes through the parts, and fasten the crosspiece to the handles with 3-in. galvanized deck screws.

PHOTO G: Mark locations for the axle near the bottom ends of the handles. Then drill V2-in.-dia. holes through each handle. A right-angle drilling guide will ensure straight holes.

PHOTO H: Cut a V-shaped notch in a scrap of 2 x 4 to help steady the axle as you drill holes for cotter pins. Fasten the notched cradle to another scrap, and clamp the jig to the drill press table.

PHOTO G: Mark locations for the axle near the bottom ends of the handles. Then drill V2-in.-dia. holes through each handle. A right-angle drilling guide will ensure straight holes.

your saw set at a 45° angle. Fasten the grooved 2x4 to a larger piece of 3/4-in. scrap to serve as a clamping surface. Clamp this "cradle" to your drill press table to support the axle while you drill it. Drill a Vs-in.-dia. hole V2 in. in from each end of the axle rod (See Photo H).

© Install the wheels. Slide the axle and wheels in place, positioning a washer on either side of each wheel. Secure the wheels by inserting cotter pins through the axle holes and bending the ends around the axle (See Photo I).

Finishing touches

© The exterior plywood cart box and treated lumber parts will hold up well to the knock-about use you're going to give this cart, and they require no special finish. However, if you'll store this cart outside where it is exposed to the elements, it's a good idea to give the cart a coat of primer and paint or penetrating wood sealer to protect the plywood parts. Otherwise, they could delaminate over time. Tip: Treated lumber is often too damp to paint when you buy it. Allow the treated wood parts on the cart several weeks to dry thoroughly before painting.

PHOTO H: Cut a V-shaped notch in a scrap of 2 x 4 to help steady the axle as you drill holes for cotter pins. Fasten the notched cradle to another scrap, and clamp the jig to the drill press table.

PHOTO I: Install the axle, washers and wheels on the cart. Slip cotter pins through the holes on each end of the axle, and secure the wheels by bending the ends of the cotter pins around the axle.

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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