Woven Wood Deck Chair Stepbystep

Tedswoodworking Plans

16.000 Woodworking Plans by Ted McGrath

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PHOTO B: Clamp the stretcher in place between the two legs, and drill V4-in. holes through the legs and into the stretcher for threaded inserts and machine screws. A right-angle drilling guide ensures straight holes.

PHOTO A: Rough-out each leg with a jig saw, then screw a hardboard leg template to it and rout the leg flush to the template with a flush-trimming bit on the router table. Set the bit's depth so the bearing rides along the template as you rout the leg shapes.

Make the legs

O Enlarge the leg pattern from the Legs drawing, page 127, to full size and use it to make a template from Vl-in. hardboard. Sand the cut edges smooth.

© Rough-out the leg shapes. Cut four rectangular leg blanks to size from exterior plywood. Using the leg template as a guide, trace about lA in. outside the template profiles onto each leg workpiece, and cut the legs to rough shape with a jig saw.

0 Trim the legs to final shape. Screw the leg template temporarily to each of the legs with countersunk screws, and trim the legs to final shape with a piloted flush-trimming bit on the router table (See Photo A).

O Fasten pairs of legs together with moisture-resistant wood glue and countersunk lVi-in. flathead wood screws to make two double-thick legs.

© Cut the leg stretchers to size and shape, and laminate them together with glue and lV4-in. screws to form one thick stretcher.

O Clamp the stretcher between the legs and drill for threaded inserts. See the Side View drawing, page 127, for stretcher placement. Drill two countersunk x/4-in.-dia. holes through each leg and about 5/8 in. deep into both ends of the stretcher (See Photo B). Center the holes on the thickness of the stretcher, and lay them out so they are spaced IV2 in. apart. Unclamp the leg assembly and redrill the holes in the ends of the stretcher to the manufacturer's recommended diameter for fitting the threaded inserts.

O Twist the threaded inserts into the holes in the stretcher with a large screwdriver, using a dab of two-part epoxy to secure each insert in place (See Photo C). Then assemble the legs and stretcher with 2-in. flathead brass machine screws.

PHOTO A: Rough-out each leg with a jig saw, then screw a hardboard leg template to it and rout the leg flush to the template with a flush-trimming bit on the router table. Set the bit's depth so the bearing rides along the template as you rout the leg shapes.

PHOTO B: Clamp the stretcher in place between the two legs, and drill V4-in. holes through the legs and into the stretcher for threaded inserts and machine screws. A right-angle drilling guide ensures straight holes.

Build the seat & back

O Cut the seat frames and back frames to shape. Start by cutting pairs of seat and back blanks to size. Follow the dimensions given in the Back Frames and Seat Frames drawings, page 127, to lay out one back frame and one seat frame. Use a combination square to mark centerpoints for drawing the IV2- and 3-in.-radiused corners on these parts, and scribe the curves with a compass. Cut out the back frame and seat frame with a jig saw, and smooth the cut edges with a sander. Then use these two frame pieces as

PHOTO C: After enlarging the stretcher holes to the proper diameter for the threaded inserts, screw in the inserts. A dab of two-part epoxy in each stretcher hole will lock the inserts in place.

PHOTO D: Rout l-in.-wide, Vs-in.-deep rabbets into the face of one seat and back frame. A shop-made jig insets the rabbet correctly from the edge of the frames, and stopblocks on the jig limit the router's path.

PHOTO C: After enlarging the stretcher holes to the proper diameter for the threaded inserts, screw in the inserts. A dab of two-part epoxy in each stretcher hole will lock the inserts in place.

patterns to help you cut the other back and seat frame to match. Save the center cutouts; they can be used as material for the arms later.

© Rout the back and seat rabbets. The woven plywood seat and back supports will be captured between the pairs of back and seat frames, which will fasten flush against one another. In order to do this, one member of each frame needs a shallow rabbet cut to accommodate the thickness of the plywood weave strips. However, the rabbet is too wide (1 in.) to rout with a piloted rabbet bit directly against the inside edges of the frames, so you'll need to build a jig from scrap 3/4-in. wood to guide the cuts. (See the tint box, below, for information on building the jig.) Mark outlines for the rabbets onto one seat and back frame piece. Clamp the rabbeting jig at both ends along the edge of your bench. Butt one edge of a seat or back frame against the jig. Resting the router base on the jig and the frame, clamp scrap wood stopblocks onto the jig so they'll limit the path of the router to stay

ROUTER RABBETING JIG

Cut two wood strips 3 in. wide and 24 and 26 in. long. Screw them together to create an L-shaped bracket with the longer strip (it will be the jig's base) overhanging the shorter one (the fence) evenly at both ends. Install a V2-in. straight bit in your router. Measure the distance from the outside edge of the router base to the bit, and rip the jig's base down on the table saw so that when the router is placed against the jig's fence, the bit clears the jig base by V2 in.

PHOTO D: Rout l-in.-wide, Vs-in.-deep rabbets into the face of one seat and back frame. A shop-made jig insets the rabbet correctly from the edge of the frames, and stopblocks on the jig limit the router's path.

within your marked area. Plan to make the first round of rabbet cuts, machining one straight portion of the frames at a time. Note: You'll have to reset the stopblocks to make each rabbet cut around the frame. Also, on the lower, straight edge of the back frame, insert a 2-in.-wide spacer strip between the jig's fence and the router base to offset the cut properly. Set the bit depth to Vs in., and make the first of two cuts around each frame. Then, move the router base away from the jig's back and make a second pass around the frames to remove the rest of the material, widening the rabbet to 1 in. (See Photo D). Round the radiused corners of the rabbets by carefully running the router along your rabbet layout lines by hand. Or, if you prefer, trim these curves with a sharp chisel.

©Use a 3/8-in. roundover bit in the router to ease the inside and outside edges of the rabbeted seat and back frames as well as the outside edges of the other back frame. The straight, square edge of each frame where the seat and back meet does not get routed.

Weave the seat & back frames

® Cut the seat weave and back weave strips to size. Cut up a few extra in case you break or miscut a few when weaving. Seal all surfaces of the strips with several coats of exterior spar varnish (See Photo E). Varnish the rabbeted areas on the frames as well.

® Weave the seat. Begin by attaching the front-to-back (lllA-m.) strips. Place the middle strip in the rabbet and center it from side to side. Hold down one end with a spring clamp and fasten the other end with two countersunk V2-in. flathead screws. Attach

PHOTO E: Seal all surfaces of the seat and back weaving strips with two coats of spar varnish. Varnish the rabbets on the seat and back frames as well as the mating surfaces on the other seat and back frame.
PHOTO F: Fasten one end of the middle seat weave strip with screws while holding the other end with a spring clamp in the rabbet. Once the strip is fastened on one end, remove the clamp. Attach the remaining front-to-back strips in the same way, spacing them 1 in. apart.
PHOTO G: After screwing down both ends of the first four cross strips on the back frame, continue weaving in the rest of the cross strips with their ends free. Then trim the weave to fit into the angled portions of the frame and screw the strips down one at a time.

the other weave strips working outward from the center strip, screwing one end of each strip to the frame 1 in. apart (See Photo F). Remove all the spring clamps so the ends of the strips are free. Then attach the side-to-side (21-in.) cross strips. Weave the first cross strip through the attached strips on the frame, starting down near their fixed ends, going over and under all the way across. Adjust the strip so there is an even lVs-in. gap between it and the inside edge of the frame, and fasten it into the rabbet at each end with two countersunk V2-in. flathead screws. Continue weaving cross strips up the seat, alternating which way you start weaving each strip to form a lattice. You should use seven strips. Space the strips 1 in. apart, with lV8-in. spaces between the outermost strips and the frame. Once the weave is complete, screw down the free ends of the front-to-back strips.

© Weave the back frame. This time, attach the first set of strips (running vertically on the frame) at the lower end of the frame. As you work your way outward from the center, let the strips overhang the angled and corner sections of the frame. Weave the cross strips in, starting at the bottom of the frame. Make all the gaps a consistent 1 in. Attach the bottom four cross strips at both ends in the rabbet. Let the remaining cross strips overhang the angled portions of the frame, and continue weaving all the way up the frame with the strips loose. Then trim the overhanging strips to fit into the rabbet (See Photo G). Cut the vertical strips to fit into the rabbets as well, and screw them down to complete the back.

© Assemble the back and seat frames. In the angled sections of the rabbeted back frame, the weaving strips overlap in some areas, doubling their thickness. In order to be able to screw the back frames together so they fit flush, you'll need to notch out these areas in the unrabbeted back frame. Set the back frame pieces together and mark spots on the unrabbeted frame that will need to be notched (See Photo H). Pare away Vs in. of material in these areas until the two frames fit snugly together. Assemble the back and seat frames with countersunk lV4-in. screws.

Attach the back frame to the seat frame

© Cut a 15° bevel along the straight edge of the chair back and seat on the table saw (See Photo I). This will create the joint where the two frames meet.

© Use a combination square to draw a line along the rear face of the back frame, 5/8 in. from the bottom

(beveled) edge. Mark points along this line at 1 in. and 7 in. from each side of the frame. Clamp the back frame to the seat frame as shown in the Side View drawing, page 127, with the bottom edge of the back frame flush with the bottom of the seat frame. Drill countersunk Vi-in. machine screw holes perpendicular to the back frame at the marked points. Use a depth stop or a piece of tape wrapped around the bit to drill the holes 2 in. deep. Separate the frames and enlarge the holes in the seat frame to accept four threaded inserts. Use epoxy when you screw the inserts into the seat frame. Fasten the back frame to the seat frame with 2-in. flathead machine screws.

Assemble the chair

© Make the arms. Follow the Arms grid drawing, page 127, to lay out and cut one arm to size. Use this workpiece as a template for cutting the other three arm pieces. Then laminate pairs of arms together with glue and IVi-in. flathead wood screws to form two arms.

(D Attach the seat to the legs. Use a combination square to draw a line along the top face of each side of the seat frame, 3A in. from the edges. Mark two points along these lines 6 in. and 12 in. from the back edge of the seat frame. Place the seat assembly on the leg assembly, and align them so the front edge of the seat overhangs the flat section of the legs by 4V2 in. Clamp the seat to the legs with their sides flush. Drill Vi-in.-dia. countersunk holes all the way through the seat frame and legs at the four marked points. Fasten the seat to the legs with 4-in. brass machine screws, nuts and washers.

© Install the arms. The front edge of each arm should be about 1% in. from the front edge of the seat frame. Pivot the arms at this point until the back edges of the arms align with the back face of the chair back. Clamp the arms in place and drill a countersunk V4-in.-dia. hole, 2 in. deep, where each arm intersects the back and seat frames. Remove the arms, drill and install threaded inserts and attach the arms to the seat and back frames with 2-in. brass machine screws (See Photo J).

Finishing touches

© Sand the unvarnished chair surfaces smooth and ease all sharp edges. Tape off and cover the varnished weaving with newspaper to protect it from paint. Prime all bare wood parts, and topcoat the chair with several coats of high-quality exterior latex paint.

PHOTO H: Mark the unrabbeted back frame in those areas that will need to fit around doubled-up weave strips. Remove this frame piece and notch out the marked areas with a sharp chisel.
PHOTO I: With the table saw blade tilted to 15°, cut a beveled edge on the seat and back frames where they will meet each other at an angle.
PHOTO J: Clamp the arm in position and connect it to the seat and back with 2-in. machine screws installed in threaded inserts.

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