Drawer Trays Doors

Once the outside of the case was finished, I turned my attention to the inside to add a pair of trays and a drawer.

CLEATS. I planned on using full-extension slides for the drawer and trays. But the slides couldn't be screwed to the case sides because the frame stiffenersgot in the way. So I added slide cleats (U) to provide a mounting surface for the slides, see Fig. 8.

These cleats are 3/4"-thick pieces of stock screwed to the frame stiffeners. They don't extend all the way to the front of the case, otherwise the doors and drawer wouldn't close all the way, see Fig. 8a. To get the needed clearance, I installed the cleats Vi6" back from the inside face of the front frame.

TRAYS. With the cleats installed in the case, I began work on the trays. I decided to use pull-out trays because it makes it a lot easier to get at your tools — especially the ones at the back.

To determine the size of the front/back tray pieces, first measure the opening between the cleats (mine was 30W). Then subtract 1" for the thickness of two slides and V&" for the lap joints atthe corners. Finding the size of the tray sides is easier. It matches the length of your slides (16").

I used these measurements to cut the tray front/back (V) and sides (W)to finished size, see Fig. 9. (My tray was 16" x 29 W.) Next, I cut a %"-wide rabbet atboth ends ofthe sides forlapjoints to join the tray pieces together, see Fig. 9a. Then a groove can be routed on the inside face of all the tray pieces to hold a W-thick piece of ply

wood for a bottom, see Fig. 9b.

Making the tray bottom (X)from V5" plywood keeps it from sagging when loaded with tools. It should fit snug in the tray pieces before you glue the tray together.

drawer. With the trays complete, the drawer is built next. What s different is how the drawer is held together. It has hand-cut dovetails for strength and durability. Here again, you want to measure the opening before making any cuts. Then cut the drawer front/back (Y) and sides (Z)

to finished size and lay out and cut the dovetails, see Figs. 10 and 10a. For more on cutting dovetails, refer to page 24.

Now rout a groove to accept a drawer bottom, see Fig. 10b. Once again, I used W-thick plywood for added strength. Then cut the bottom (AA) to fit tight and glue and clamp the drawer together.

TRAY BACK

SIDE

TRAY BACK

SIDE

TRAY

TRAY

SIDE

TOP VIEW

END VIEW

Size groove to match plywood

You'll probably notice the groove cut for the drawer bottom is still visible on the drawer front. But don't worry about it. It'll be hidden by a false front added later.

SLIDE INSTALLATION. After the drawer and trays are complete, the next step is to install the full-extension drawer slides. I used a pair of 16" slides for the drawer and each tray. (To find sources for the hardware you need to build this bench, see page 31.)

Basically, installing the slides is a two-step process. First, one half of the slide is screwed to the slide cleat in the case, see Fig. 8. Then the other half is mounted to the drawer or tray, see Figs. 11 and 11a.

FALSE FRONT. With the drawer installed in the case, a false front (BB) is added next. This is just a W-thick piece of stock that fits in the case with a Vie" clearance all around, see Fig. 12.

Before screwing the false front to the drawer, I drilled a pair of ^"-dia. holes for some wood knobs. Then install the false front, keeping the needed clearance around the drawer and glue the knobs in the holes.

DOORS

The last thing to add to the cabinet is a set of doors. The unique thing about these doors is they're cut to fit tight first — then trimmed for clearance later.

The goal here is to have a V\6" clearance on the top, bottom, and along the sides of the doors, see Fig. 14. You also need the same clearance (Vi6") between the doors in the middle. So I measured the opening in the frame first (19V811 x 32") and then cut the

DRAWER BOTTOM

NOTE:

Center of slide aligns with layout fine

DRAWER BOTTOM

Exposedgroove will be hidden by false front

NOTE:

Center of slide aligns with layout fine

CROSS SECTION

16" full-extension drawer slide

Exposedgroove will be hidden by false front

stiles (CC) and rails (DD) or a tight fit, see Fig. 13. But remember to allow for the tenons when cutting the rails to length.

Note: Later, after the doors are assembled you can trim them for the Vi6" clearance.

Next, a groove is routed in all the frame pieces to match the thickness of the center panel, see Fig. 13a. And to hold the frame together, tenons are cut on the ends of the rails to fit snug in the grooves, see Fig. 13b. Then a door panel (EE) is cut to fit in each frame before gluing the door together.

Now a pair of hinges can be installed on each door by mortising them into the front frame and door stiles, see Figs. 13 and 14. Here, I used a couple pennies for spacers to hold the door in position while installing the hinges, see Figs. 14a and 14b.

Finally, to complete the doors, a pair of knobs is attached to the door stiles. And a pair of ball catches is installed in the cabinet to hold the doors closed.

emm top

After the cabinet is complete, I worked on the bench top next. Note: For more on building laminated tops, refer to page 14.

STRIPS. This laminated top consists of 13 bench top strips (FF). These strips are lW-thick pieces of stock cut to a finished length of 62" and a rough width of 39A6". Later, the top is sanded to its final thickness (3W), see exploded view at right.

ALIGNMENT HOLES. To keep all the strips aligned when gluing them together, I drilled holes for short lengths of W-dia. dowels, see detail "a.' But remember, the two outside strips (1 and 13) only have holes on one face.

DOG HOLES. You could glue the bench top strips together now. But I didn't want to wrestle with a heavy top. And there are still a few things left to do.

First, a series of %"-dia. dog holes are drilled in the top for bench dogs, see detail 'b.' Refer to page 31 for sources of bench dogs. Then rout a Vfe" chamfer around each hole to soften the sharp edges.

roundover. Next, the corners on the two outside strips are rounded over, see detail 'c.' Note: But don't round the corner at the end where the vise will be mounted.

NOTCH. There's one more thing to do before gluing the top together. And that's to rout a pocket in the front strip for mounting a metal vise. The back jaw of the vise slips into this pocket. This way, the metal jaw is

CROSS SECTION (BENCH STRIPS)

1%-JJ

^f^dowel

Through hole

CROSS SECTION (BENCH STRIPS)

^f^dowel

Through hole

Top edge

Front strip (No.1)

a- CROSS SECTION

covered by the front strip, and you have a long, smooth surface to clamp against, see Figs. 15 and 18.

GLUE-UP. With the pocket routed, the bench top strips can be glued together, see Fig. 16. Later, I used a belt sander to sand the top and bottom faces smooth.

BENCH TOP INSTALLATION. Once the top is sanded, it can be attached to the cabinet. But first I routed an V$" chamfer around the bottom edge, see Fig. 17. Then position the top so it's centered side to side with a lVV overhang on the back, see Fig. 17a Now drill shank holes through the cleats in the cabinet and use 3" lag screws with washers to hold the bench top in place.

VISE

With the top secured to the cabinet, the vise can be installed next. I used a Record vise,

Top edge

Front strip (No.1)

a- CROSS SECTION

2Wk"

Laminated

FRONT VIEW

Install top so it's centered side-to-side on cabinet

NOTE:

Before mounting top to base rout Vs" chamfer around bottom edges r r- ~ i——

NOTE:

Before mounting top to base rout Vs" chamfer around bottom edges

model #52Vfc ED. It features a quick-release on the frontjaw, so it can be moved in or out with the touch of a lever.

VISE INSTALLATION. But before installing the vise, I added a spacer block (GG) to make the top of the face block (added next) level with the bench top. This 3/4M-thick piece of stock is cut to match the mounting plate on the vise (in my case 5" x 9"). Then drill V£"-dia. mounting holes through the spacer block and screw the block and vise to the bench top, see Fig. 18.

FACE BLOCK. After installing the vise, I covered the front jaw with a thick maple block. This block protects your workpiece and also spreads the clamping pressure over a larger area.

To make the face block (HH), glue together a couple pieces of stock to create a 2V£"-thick laminated piece, see exploded view and detail'd' on page 12 .Then drill two 3/4"-dia. dog holes in the face block and round over the two outside corners. Now rout a W chamfer on the bottom edge and attach the face block to the vise, see Fig. 18.

To complete the bench top, I used a handheld router to rout a Vfc" chamfer on the top edge (including the vise), see Fig. 19. It removes the sharp edge left over from sanding the top smooth. Q

Vi"x3" lag screw

Washer

Vi"x3" lag screw

Washer

NOTE:

Chamfer top edge of face block with vise closed

NOTE:

Chamfer top edge of face block with vise closed

MATERIALS LIST

CASE

D Center divider (1)

E Back Panels (2)

I Filler Strips (1)

L Side Cleats (2)

M Case Bottom 1

N Hor. Stiffeners (3)

3/4 X 67/a - 323/4 3/4 X 3 - 243/8 Va ply. - 151/4 X 243/s 3/4 x 2 - 32 Vi 2 -

3/4X43/8- 323/4 i/4x3/8-60(rgh) 3/4 ply. -171/4 x 321/2 3/4 xi1/4- 34 Vi 3/4 x IV4-14 1/2 ply.- 161/2X34V2 3/4 x2 - 341/2

/4X 11/4- 28Vfe(rgh) Vert. Stiffeners (2) % x 11/4- 5Vz (rgh) Vert. Stiffeners (2) 3/4X IV4- 19V2(rgh)

Mntg. Cleats (2) V4x11/4-15 Fr./Bk Kickbrds. (2)3/4 x 4 - 37Vi

Side Kickbrds. (2) Slide Cleats (6) Tray Fr./Bk. (4) W Tray Sides (4) X Tray Bottoms (2) Y Dr. Fr./Bk. (2) Z Dr. Sides (2) AA Dr. Bottom (1) BB Dr. False Fr. (1) CC Door Stiles (4) DD Door Rails (4) EE Door Panels (2)

3/4x43/fe-16 1/2 ply. - 151/4x283/4 3/4X47/8 -31% 3/4x2Vi - 19Vfe

BENCH TOP

FF Bench. Strips (13) 13/4 x 3Vi s - 62 GG Spacer Block (1) 3/4> 5. 9 HH Face Block (1)

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