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'Dimensions ndudo tongth of tongues and tenons fNomnal dimens»ons given; measure inside of case to s¡ze parts for your cabinet section aa top-track detail exploded view rear-slot detail

'Dimensions ndudo tongth of tongues and tenons fNomnal dimens»ons given; measure inside of case to s¡ze parts for your cabinet niqucs I'll describe.

Make the carcase first. Glue up stock for the top, bottom and sides. (See Fig. 1 and Bill of Materials.) Leave the center divider a bit long, but rip it to 8s/ie in. wide. I edge glued my stock with a 3/i©-in. square tongue-and-groove joint, though butt joints will work.

Next, cut the joints for the corners of the case. The half-dovetail rabbet joint I designed for the corners is a nice-looking joint. I developed some handy router accessories and a special jig for making the joint, which are explained in the sidebar on page 23. You could substitute dowels, dovetails or a screwed rabbet joint if you want.

Once you've completed the corner joinery, rout a slot on the rear, inside faces of the sides, top and bottom to receive the tongue of the back frame. (See Fig. 1.) I use a Vi6 in. slotting cutter that cuts a Vie-in. deep slot (Paso Robles Carbide #TA 293K3, see Sources), and my right-angle jig (see sidebar) to rout this slot with a hand-held router. You could also use a Vie-in.

straight bit and an edge guide, though I think the slotting cutter and jig do a superior job. Also, rout the Vt6-in. square slots on the inside face of the cabinet bottom for the bottom door tracks. (See Fig. 1.)

Next, rout the Vs-in. wide x Vie-in. deep stopped dadoes in the center of the top and bottom for the divider. Cut the dadoes 81/« in. long, measured from the back slot toward the front. I clamp a straight fence across the pieces, and rout the dadoes with a Vn-in. straight bit.

Now, dry clamp the carcase together, and measure the length and height of the inside to determine the correct dimensions for the divider and back frame. These measurements are critical for a good fit. The drawings show the dimensions of my carcase, but slight variations in the geometry of the dovetailed rabbet joints at the corners may vary the inside dimensions for your carcase. When you have these dimensions, add 3/« in. to the length and height to give the overall dimensions for the back frame (including

No need for keeper strips or glazing putty. The top rail on the door frame Is removable, so the glass can slide into grooves routed in the stiles and rails.

No need for keeper strips or glazing putty. The top rail on the door frame Is removable, so the glass can slide into grooves routed in the stiles and rails.

Cut the divider to length, and machine the tongues to fit the dadoes. Lay out and drill the shelf-hanger holes on I-in. centers on the divider and sides (See Section View, Fig. 1.) I prefer "L"-shaped brass hangers with Va-in. long. '/j-in. diameter studs. It's a good idea to stack the top. bottom and sides of the cabinet on stickers to avoid warping while you make the back and doors.

As I mentioned, I like to make the back an open frame, though you could easily let in solid panels if you prefer. Size the stiles and rails according to the inside case dimensions taken before, making sure to allow material for the rail tenons and the tongue around the perimeter of the frame.

The center stile of the back frame joins the top and bottom rails with half laps. I cut the laps in the two rails at the same time by clamping them together edge to edge and removing the wood with a fence-guided router. I use a V:-in. flush-trim bit with a '/¿-in. long cutter and '/2-in. dia. pilot bearing mounted above the cutter (Paso Robles Carbide #TA 170, see Sources).

The removable door track at the top of the cabinet simplifies the sliding-door installation.

That way I can place the fence right on the layout lines for the laps —the bearing rides the fence, while the cutter removes a section of wood right up to the lines. You can also cut the lap joints with a dado blade on the tablesaw.

Rout laps on both ends of the center stile, using the same method you used before. Glue up the back frame, and when it's dry, rout a centered 3/if.-in. square tongue around the perimeter of the frame.

Making the Doors

The door construction is the most interesting element in the whole cabinet. The door frames are joined with 3/*-in. sliding dovetails, which allows the top rail to be easily removed for replacing the glass, as shown in the photo and Fig. 2. This joint detail also makes the doors strong, and it looks nice as well.

Cut the door stiles and rails to the dimensions given in the Bill of Materials, which includes an allowance for dovetails and sliders on the rails. The dimensions given allow the doors to overlap about V2 in. when they're closed. Cut a '/a-in. slot centered along the

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