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post joinery

spindle layout

74-M.DIA.X l-IM. DEEP HOLES

Attach arms here.

To make the dou ble-biscuit Joints, first cut the slots in the post Adjust the fence on the plate joiner so that it's about 7« in. from the blade. Cut the two slots from opposite faces of the post They should be about 7« in. apart

CJamp the part to be joined to the post—arm, leg, or stretcher—to the workbench, and place a 7»4n. thick scrap on top of it This scrap serves as a spacer while you cut the second set of slots. Again, cut the slots from opposite faces. The slots should be exactly the same distance apart as they are on the post

CJamp the part to be joined to the post—arm, leg, or stretcher—to the workbench, and place a 7»4n. thick scrap on top of it This scrap serves as a spacer while you cut the second set of slots. Again, cut the slots from opposite faces. The slots should be exactly the same distance apart as they are on the post

Use handscrews, as shown, to assemble the legs and arms to the posts. You'll need four to clamp a single pair of arms or legs.

the finished spindles to length until after you dry assemble the quilt rack. At that time you can label the position of each, cut it flush with the upper arch, and saw a small slot in the tip for a wedge.

Making the arches. Saw both arches from the same l'A-in. thick board. Before cutting the shape of the arches, bore the holes that will hold the spindles and dowels. For the spindles, drill Va-in. dia. holes spaced 4 in. apart through the edge of the board. Mark the arches on one face and both ends. Then drill two '/.»-in. dia. x 1 -in. deep holes in each end of the arches for the dowels. After drilling all the holes, cut the arches, and sand them on a drum sander. To make sure thev match precisely, tape them together edge to edge while you sand them. Be careful to maintain a flowing or "fair" curve (one without dips or bumps), as you sand.

Making the joints. If you have a plate-joiner machine (see May/June, 1988 AW), join the arms, legs, and bottom stretcher to the posts with wood plates or "biscuits." Use two biscuits for each joint to double the strength of the joinery. If you don't have a plate joiner, use a dowel joint. Dowel holes in the posts can be made to match the holes in the arches by using dowel centers available from most mail-order tool suppliers. A

Nick Engler is a contributing editor of AMERICAN WOODWORKER. He has written more than 20 wvod-uvrking hooks, and teaches cabinet-making at the Uniwrsity of Cincin-nati in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Use handscrews, as shown, to assemble the legs and arms to the posts. You'll need four to clamp a single pair of arms or legs.

FIG. 3: EXPLODED VIEW

join arches to posts with dowels; arms; legs and stretcher with biscuits.

arm/leg pattern arch pattern

Putting a Lid On It

Hand-Tool Techniques for Installing Butt Hinges by roger holmes omctimes it seems there are as many types of hinges as there are things that open and close. Still, with all this variety, I prefer to use old-fashioned, brass butt hinges for most things I build. They're simple to install and add a nice, subtle touch to a box or cabinet door.

I buy extruded brass butt hinges. They're quite a bit more expensive ($4.00 a pair and up), but they're worth it. Die formed and crisply u

quadrant

Set another marking gauge to depth of mortise, just shy of hinge*pin centerlioe.

^^ Set one marking gauge to width of mortise, just shy of hinge-pin centerline.

^^ Mark hinge position with pencil, then scribe mortise width and depth.

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