Wedges

Now that kerfs are cut in the tenons, the final step is to cut and fit the wedges. Kven though the concept of a wedge is simple, cutting the perfect sized wedge can be quite a challenge. That's because there are three variables to any wedge length, thickness, and taper and each one affects the other, see Step 7. guidelines. Fortunately, there's a simple solution to this problem. I cut the wedge so its bottom is slightly less than the width of 7 Wedge is cut so bottom is sligh tly less than...

Backing Board And Stand

The last step in constructing a picture frame is to make the backing board and stand. The backing board holds the photo and glass in the frame. And the stand is a wedge-shaped block screwed to the back of the backing board, see Fig. 9. backing board. The backing board (G) can be made of any stiff Vfc-thick material. such as Masonite or plywood. Cut the board to width to fit the groove in the frame. (Mine measured 5.) As for length, cut the board to fit from the top of the groove to the bottom...

Trimming Through Tenons

CHISEL TOWARD CENTER AS YOU WORK AROUND TENON After assembling the Shop Stool (shown on page 18), I was faced with the problem of trimming the ends of the protruding tenons flush with the seat and the legs, see Fig. 1. The reason this is tricky is that none of the tenons are trimmed flush to aflat surface. So the procedure I found to be most accurate is to trim the tenons flush in four steps using hand tools. rough-trim. The first step is to rough-trim the ends of the tenons with a hand saw,...

Glue Joint Failure

The glue joints on a project I made a few months ago have failed. Is there any way this could have been prevented Dan Wieland Thatcher, Arizona When glue joint failure occurs, it's usually thought that the glae is the problem. But the glue is rarely at fault. As long as the shelf life of the glue hasn't been passed, and the glue hasn't been frozen, the odds are the glue is okay, explains Bryan River, a research scientist at the USDA Forest Products Laboratory. Bryan suggests that the most...

Sawdust

I want to get started in woodworking, but I don't know what to build. I lave any suggestions I used to think that the best advice was Ihe practical approach, start with a few small projects to get the hang of the basics. Then work up to larger projects. But that might not be much fun. especially if you start with a small project you don't like just to learn a basic technique. Why not start out with a project you're really interested in no matter how big or how...

Drill Press Angle Gauge

Drilling angled holes on a drill press is a straightforward matter if your drill press table tilts. If your table doesn't tilt, see the Shop Note below. But even if the table can be tilted, you may have a problem setting the table at just the right angle. When we were building the Shop Stool for this issue see page 18 , we needed to drill holes at an exact angle. Otherwise all the drilled parts wouldn't line up for assembly. But I've never been comfortable relying on the angle indicator that's...

Table

QU ESTION Is there some tech n iquefor getting a really good edge on a table saw For a long time, a table saw was all I ever used. In fact, with a sharp blade and a well-adjusted saw. you may never need a jointer. The technique for jointing on the table saw is simple. But before trying this, check to be sure the blade is clean. 90 to the table, and parallel with the rip fence. I use a sharp 40-tooth carbide-tipped combination blade. skim ct.t. To get a smooth edge, I use a skim cut technique....

Woodsmith

Editor Design Director Managing Editor Associate Editor Assistant Editors Circulation Director Subscription Manager Newsstand Sales Shop Manager Donald B. Peschke Ted Kralicek Douglas L. Micks Terry J. Stroh man James M. D lau Richard S. Peters Gordon Gaippe Ken Munkel David Kreyling Cary Christensen Rod Stoakes Chris Glowacki Dirk Ver Steeg Kurt Schultz liz Bredeson Sandy Baum Kent A. Buckton Steve Curtis WOODSM1TH CATALOG Marketing Director Robert Murry iraphics Director J on Snyder Project...

How To Router A Seat Base

Pendulum Router Jig

How do you make a hardwood stool comfortable to sit on Traditionally, you might scoop out the dished seat with a scorp or inshave. Or you could simply add a cushion. For the Shop Stool shown on page 18, I wanted a uniform y lt on-toured seat that's nearly impossible to get with hand tools. What I came up with was a way to shape the seat using a router and a special scooping jig. With this jig. the router moves like a pendulum but it's not suspended from above. Instead, the router rides roller...