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saw with the tahle tilted to 45°.

These iwo fixtures convert waste strips into laminated "hoards" that can Ik? used for many products. To make the hrcadl»oard, for example, contrasting strips Here glued up in the short jig until they Here uhout 5 in. Hide. This 20-in. "hoard*" Has then crosscut in the middle to make two 10-in. hoard* that could l»e "kookmntcbed" between wider oak scrap stri|>*.

To make hoops, haml-clamp a thin strip around a basketball, using a luind-sann "bridge" under the clamp head to muintuin the curve. Then infiute the Imll to tighten the lamination.

A shopmudc jig such as this proto-ty|h* Hill rout clear, short Iniards into trivets or other quiek projects. Clamp beads on the underside hold the Hork against a fixed right-angle fenee and two right-angle shims that help center different size stock.

These iwo fixtures convert waste strips into laminated "hoards" that can Ik? used for many products. To make the hrcadl»oard, for example, contrasting strips Here glued up in the short jig until they Here uhout 5 in. Hide. This 20-in. "hoard*" Has then crosscut in the middle to make two 10-in. hoard* that could l»e "kookmntcbed" between wider oak scrap stri|>*.

defects that would cause you to junk the blank during turning.

Chunks, the last category of materials. are the woodturner's meat. You can store a lot of these on shelves or in bins, but remember it's the quality of the pile that counts, not the quantity.

Steady Uses

As a source of wood for interesting projects, the scrap pile is a gold mine. Oven tiny pieces of wood can yield belt buckles, chopsticks, hair clips, handles for your pockct knife and many other objects. You can turn jewelry on a lathe. Or use a motor tool to sculpt pieces so tiny you have to hot-melt glue them to the end of a stick to work them. I suspect you could make beads and buttons by ninning them through a rock-polishing machine. And you could use precious scraps for tools, marking gauges, try-squares and handles. just as the old-time craftsmen did.

You could also decorate existing furniture with inlays of sentimental

woods. Or use a drill press as a rudimentary lathe for turning occasional knobs and linials. Just epoxy a threaded rod onto the scrap, handsaw it round, then chuck it in the drill press and use the belt sander for shaping.

But these projects are mostly diver

To make hoops, haml-clamp a thin strip around a basketball, using a luind-sann "bridge" under the clamp head to muintuin the curve. Then infiute the Imll to tighten the lamination.

A shopmudc jig such as this proto-ty|h* Hill rout clear, short Iniards into trivets or other quiek projects. Clamp beads on the underside hold the Hork against a fixed right-angle fenee and two right-angle shims that help center different size stock.

sions that don't use much wood. Slightly better would be a production run of bases for pen-and-pencil sets. Or replace» ing the plastic liandles on good, stainless tableware sets with beautiful wood.

Templates

Having a few templates for production items can encourage you to convert scrap even as you make it. Just trace the template onto the scrap, roughly cut the parts to size, then store them in a net bag (such as the kind oranges come in) until you get a complete set of whatever you're making. With these hanging on the wall, you'll be constantly reminded of which projects are in the works.

A really good template will let you make things with little time wasted on calculations and machine setups. For example, the template shown on page 33 (see Scrap wood Cam Clamps) gives you all the dimensions, saw settings and hole spaeings you need to make a clamp. You can make a lot of these before you have too many. And you can sell your surplus.

You can apply the template idea to birdhouscs, production boxes or whatever. For projects requiring several templates. h<x)k the templates together with a key ring or piece of wire.

Templates can have ingenious features. too. In addition to serving as patterns for tracing or overall shape, they can have notches showing where each piece of wood will glue to its neighbors. You can make them from Plcxi-glas to allow you to best orient grain direction. You can design them with integral fences and pins to precisely locate stock and keep it from slipping. A template can double as a router guide, incorporate precise angle settings or even be a push slick.

Jigs and Fixtures

As a result of rabbeting, my shop's scrap includes a lot of thin strips that I can turn into kitchen cutting l>oards and other familiar craft items. You can dress these strips safely on the table-saw, using feather boards and a hold-down block above the blade, then glue them up. Clamping fixtures let you painlessly glue strips into "boards," using wedges to apply the pressure. (See photo.) You mount the fixtures to

A PRO'S APPROACH

In my profession of picture framing, scrap accounts for about 25 percent of my materials and 1 have to deal with it ruthlessly.

My crew and I have stopped trying to save odd-sized pieces of glass, for example, because these prove impractical to sort through and prone to damage. Instead, we cut all scraps to standard sizes and file it with the new glass.

Similarly, we cut all scraps of mat board to standard sizes and store them vertically in bins mounted atop a cabinet where they're easy to page through. W e avoid confusion between similar colors such as beige and ecru by filing the boards in alphabetical order.

To bring some sanity to storing hundreds of styles of molding, we put cut pieces back in the rack (see photo. page 29) with the mitered end facing out to indicate that they are not full length. Scraps shorter than about 2 ft. go into vertical bins mounted above our miter machine. The compartments have built-in gauges at 6. 9. 12 and 18 in. so we can see at a glance if a piece is long enough for a job.

But is my scrap flow under control? We had a frame-it-voursclf room a few years ago, at the height of the fad. It was located in a draftv. uninsulated room that we were able to heat comfortably with scraps in a wood stove. When the fad died out. we eventually ran out of customers. bin we never ran short of fuel.—/.C

A round magnet priisl from tin* liack of a discarded speaker makes a convenient »top when haiidsawiug assorted scrap to usalile length. It's easy to adjust, yet it takes a serious whack to move it.

a wall and then clamp and glue scraps together as you cut them.

Strips of interesting wood don't even have to be full width to be useful in this setup. After you laminate the main board, you can run a shallow saw kerf down its full length and then glue a narrow contrasting piece into it. You can also use this trick to cover and reinforce a less-than-perfcct glue joint.

I've even turned these strips into hoops, using a simple basketball press. (See photo, previous page.)

The router is a terrific machine for converting scrap into finished products. The bottom photo on the previous page shows a jig that makes kitchen trivets from waste. You clamp the work beneath, then rout a series of grooves halfway through it. You just flip the work over and rout grooves in lite other direction to complete the grid.

Keep in mind that you can easily hide most small defects in scrap. A

craft-store owner once lovingly handed me a small box lid and said, "just look at that craftsmanship!" The lid showed a perfectly round, contrasting inlay as decoration, something the store owner took for a level of workmanship that died out around the middle of the Renaissance. What the maker had done, actually, was to drill a hole clear through the lid, pound a dowel into it. and sand it flush. "Mmm ..." I said in appreciation, handing it back to him. What defect the dowel disguised. I cer-tainlv don't know.

Getting It Out Of the Shop

What you make from your scrap will depend on the type of wood you have, your machines and your whim. Somebody locally will take all you can make of something. The trick is to find out what that something is. It doesn't have to be complicated. For example, 1 knew a guy at the local lumberyard who set up a spare-time business drilling out plugs for contractors to use in floors. That guy had the smallest waste pile I'd ever seen, and all of it was full of holes.

If the plug market in your area is sewn up, you might apply the same idea to cutting circles for toy wheels. You or somcbodv will use them even-

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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