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Several different movements can be used on this clock (including battery-powered movements). The movement we chose is from Mason & Sullivan Co., 586 Higgins Crowell Road, West Yarmouth, Cape Cod, MA 02673.

We ordered the Westminster Chime (No. 3600X, $97.50) that drives a moving moon dial (No. 7387X, $69). We also ordered most of the hardware (hinges, handle, and knob) from the Mason & Sullivan Company (send for the catalog).

MATERIALS LIST

A Door Stiles (2)

B Bottom Door Rail (1)

E Case Top/Bottom (2)

F Plywood Back (1)

G Plywood Front (1)

H Crown Molding (1)

I Crown Molding (1)

J Crown Molding (1)

K Base Molding (1)

,3/i6 x 1 Va - 9V, ,3/i6 X 37/s - 9% ,3/i« x 3Vb - 12'/j

13/l6 X 3S/8 - 8va Va" Plywood Va" Plywood

13/l6 x SVj - 107/8 ,3/i6 x 4 Vt - 9Vb ,3/,« x 3 - 83/a '3/,6 x SVa - 10% '/a x 23/4 - 6%

CUTTING DIAGRAM

,3/,*" x 5Vj■ - 60"

d

d

e

e

c

>////sA

•Vit" x 7Va" - 60

l

h

k

l

///////////////////////

figure 12

'/a" quarter round

'/«" shoulder shoulder

V37" ROMAN OGEE

'/." shoulder glue feet to base

w quarter round w stock ®

front view

figure 13

glue feet to base detail a

vj" cove w quarter round w stock ®

front view figure 14

handle

Vi"

counter bore Va" deep

MATERIALS LIST

A Door Stiles (2)

B Bottom Door Rail (1)

E Case Top/Bottom (2)

F Plywood Back (1)

G Plywood Front (1)

H Crown Molding (1)

I Crown Molding (1)

J Crown Molding (1)

K Base Molding (1)

,3/i6 x 1 Va - 9V, ,3/i6 X 37/s - 9% ,3/i« x 3Vb - 12'/j

13/l6 X 3S/8 - 8va Va" Plywood Va" Plywood

13/l6 x SVj - 107/8 ,3/i6 x 4 Vt - 9Vb ,3/,« x 3 - 83/a '3/,6 x SVa - 10% '/a x 23/4 - 6%

glass-

figure 14

handle

Vi"

counter bore Va" deep glass-

figure 15

glass dial

Va plywood back 0-

CUTTING DIAGRAM

figure 15

glass dial

Va plywood back 0-

Molded Mortise & Tenon

A SHAPELY VARIATION OF AN OLD FAVORITE

der of the molding must remain intact (untouched).

In the past three years, we've shown several variations of cutting mortise and tenon joints — especially for cabinet doors where the application is ideal. Most of the variations we've shown are rather straight-forward . . . nothing particularly fancy, just good solid joints.

But this time around, we wanted to put a little pizzazz on the door frames for three of the projects in this issue. To do that we made a molding cut on the inside edge of both the rails and stiles of the door frame. Adding this little feature isn't all that difficult, but it does require some extra hand work and careful planning.

THE MOLDED EDGE

The molded edge is, in effect, an extension of the inside edge of the rails and stiles. However, the profile (shape) of this molded edge must leave a small shoulder on the face side of the rails and stiles. Everything you do (as far as measuring is concerned) is done with that shoulder as a reference point.

The first step is to cut the stiles (the pieces that will receive the mortises) to final length (the height of the door opening). The rails (with the tenons) should be cut to rough length for now (they'll be trimmed to final length later).

Then the molded edge can be cut. For three projects shown in this issue (the Cabinet, the Mantle Clock and the Mirror), we used a shouldered quarter round, cutting it on a router table, see Fig. 1.

rabbet oh groove. If you're going to insert a panel in the door frame, you also need to cut a groove on the inside edge of each piece. Or, if you're going to insert glass, you need to cut a rabbet.

No matter which cut you make, the depth of the cut is critical. The depth of cut for either the groove or the rabbet must be equal to (in line with) the shoulder of the molding cut, see Fig. 1.

clean off molded edge. Before the mortise can be cut, part of the molding on the stiles must be trimmed off. To determine the width of this cut, hold the stile over the saw blade, and adjust the fence until the shoulder is aligned with the outside edge of the blade, see Fig. 2.

Then set the depth of cut to trim off most of the molding, see Fig. 3. Just make multiple passes until the molding is removed. It's best to keep the depth of cut a tad under the shoulder for these cuts. Then carefully pare off the excess (left from the saw cuts) using a sharp chisel, see Fig. 4. Note: Don't remove too much, the shoul der of the molding must remain intact (untouched).

CUTTING THE MORTISE AND TENON

As we've shown in previous articles on mortise and tenon joinery, I like to cut a European-style mortise (called a slot mortise). First mark the length of the mortise by scribing a line W from the end of the stile to mark one end of the mortise. Then I used a chisel to mark the other end (see Fig. 5) right where the molding ends. (It's best to use a chisel to make this mark because later you'll need a good accurate mark to align the miter cut on the molding.)

To rough-out the mortise, clamp a fence on the drill press and adjust it so you're drilling exactly on the center of the stile. Drill a series of holes to rough out the length of the mortise, see Fig. 6. Then clean up the sides (cheeks) of the mortise with a sharp chisel.

Shop Note: I prefer brad-point spur bits or the special mortise bits shown in Figure 6. (These special bits are available from Sears, Catalog No. 9 GT 24215.)

the tenon. There are several methods for cutting the tenons on the rails, but the one I like the best is shown in Figure 8. First, cut the rails to final length, allowing for the distance between the stiles and the length of the two tenons.

To cut the tenons, set the depth of cut of the saw blade by using the mortise as a guide, see Fig. 7. Next, adjust the fence so the distance between it and the outside of the saw blade is equal to the length of the tenon.

Now make the shoulder cut for the tenon by guiding the rail through the saw blade with the miter gauge, see Fig. 8. Then continue to make multiple cuts out to the end of the tenon to finish it.

Now you can flip the rail over and cut the other face of the tenon. However, it's always best to check this cut by making a trial cut out at the end of the tenon and then testing the fit in the mortise.

trim to size. After the tenon has been cut to the proper thickness, it must be trimmed to width. This is done with the fence in the same position, and the height of the saw blade adjusted to make the cuts as shown in Fig. 9. Finally, round over the corners of the tenon (with a file) so it fits the rounded corners of the mortise.

MITERED CORNERS

Now comes the fun part. The corners of the molding must be mitered so the joint fits together. Although this can be done on a table saw, I prefer to do it with a sharp chisel so I can slowly sneak up on the cut.

To guide the chisel, I made a simple jig (shown in Fig. 10). This is just a thick piece of scrap with a groove cut in it to accept the rails and stiles. Then one end of the jig is mitered at 45°.

To miter the molding on the stiles, slip the stile in the jig and align the chisel mark (made in Fig. 5) with the mitered edge of the jig, see Fig. 11. First, chip off the corner of the molding. Then very carefully pare the molding down to the mitered surface of the jig.

The same thing is done with the rail. Slide it into the jig so the shoulder of the tenon is aligned with the mitered face of the jig. Then pare off the molding.

The finished joint should fit together with the two mitered moldings mating perfectly. This takes a little work (and patience), but the results are impressive.

fence corner round groove with for panel shoulder rabbet for glass align shoulder with outside of blade adjust height of blade under shoulder

IThe molding cut should leave a shoulder along the edge of each piece. Then the depth of the rabbet or groove must be equal to the depth of that shoulder.

2 Part of the molded edge must be removed from the stile. To set the length of this cut, use the shoulder of the rail as a guide to adjust the position of the fence.

3 Next, set the depth of cut to just skim under the shoulder of the molding. Guide the stile through the blade with the miter gauge, making multiple passes.

knick shoulder with chisel >•"

sears mortise bit drill series of holes to rough out mortise

6 Clamp a fence to the drill press and adjust it so the drill bit is exactly centered on the stile. Then drill a series of holes to rough out the mortise.

5 Mark the length of the mortise by drawing a line Vj," from the end of the stile. Then use a chisel to "knick" the shoulder nght where the molding ends.

4 Pare off the excess left by the saw cuts with a sharp chisel, working from the "back" of the stile. Don't pare off any of the shoulder — leave it intact.

leave fence in same position adjust height of blade trial cut set blade height to bottom of mortise

7 To cut the tenon, set the depth of cut using the mortise as a guide. If the mortise is exactly centered, this setting mil work for both faces of the tenon.

8 Next, set the distance between the fence and the outside of the saw blade equal to the length of the tenon. Then make a shoulder cut and continue out to the end.

9 Finally, urith the fence in the same position, set the depth of cut to trim the tenon to width. Then round-over the corners urith a file to fit the mortise.

align face of jig with shoulder of tenon

To miter the corners of the molding, make a simple jig out of a thick piece of scrap. Cut a groove to hold the rails and stiles, and miter the end at 1*5°.

n Place the stile in the jig, lining up the chisel cut (made in Step 5) with the mitered face of the jig. Then pare off the corner of the molding with a chisel.

* For the rail, line up the shoulder of I JL the tenon with the mitered face of the jig. Then carefully pare down the molding until the corner is also cut at 45°.

stile from back stile from back distance from fence to shoulder equals length of tenon fence

rail with miter gauge with miter gauge distance from fence to shoulder equals length of tenon fence rail trim molding flush with face of jig align knick made in step 5 with face of jig

trim molding flush with face of jig align knick made in step 5 with face of jig

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Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

Wood Working for Amateur Craftsman

THIS book is one of the series of Handbooks on industrial subjects being published by the Popular Mechanics Company. Like Popular Mechanics Magazine, and like the other books in this series, it is written so you can understand it. The purpose of Popular Mechanics Handbooks is to supply a growing demand for high-class, up-to-date and accurate text-books, suitable for home study as well as for class use, on all mechanical subjects. The textand illustrations, in each instance, have been prepared expressly for this series by well known experts, and revised by the editor of Popular Mechanics.

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