The Moldings

What turns this basic box into a mantel clock are the six molded pieces used for the crown and base. Although each profile uses different setups, I followed the same general rules for routing all the pieces.

1) Because of the small size of the pieces being molded, using a router table (see Woodsmith No. 20) is the only way to safely cut the different profiles.

2) Some woods have a nasty habit of chipping out as they're routed. To help prevent the worst of this, start every pass on the end grain of the piece. Then the following pass on the long grain usually removes the damage.

3) Although some of these cuts are made with bits that have a pilot, I also used the router table's fence (positioned flush with the pilot) to stabilize the smaller pieces at the beginning and end of each cut.

FIGURE 9

DISTANCE EQUALS THICKNESS OF STOCK

FIGURE 9

FRONT CORNER DETAIL

DISTANCE EQUALS THICKNESS OF STOCK

Va x Vi" TONGUE

Va x Vi" TONGUE

FIGURE 10

BACK CORNER DETAIL

ON TOP OR BOTTOM PIECES

All of these molding cuts are made using six bits; V2" cove, %2" roman ogee, V2" core box, a rabbet bit (any size), and both a V* and quarter round.

the crown. The crown consists of three pieces, all with different molded edges, see Fig. 12. The first piece (H) is cut to size and routed with a roman ogee bit. After this piece is routed, there should be a Va" lip hanging over all four edges of the top of the case, see Fig. 14.

Note: This piece is the same size as the base (K), so I cut them at the same time.

The next piece (I) is cut 1" smaller (in both dimensions) and routed in two passes with two different bits: a V2" cove bit and then a straight bit.

The third piece for the crown (J), is cut to size 1 V2" smaller than the second piece (I), and routed with two bits: a V2" quarter-round bit and a Vz core box bit.

the base. The base piece (K) is identical to the bottom crown piece (H). The feet are cut to size from Vk'-thick stock (see Fig. 13), and routed with a V2" quarter-round bit on the three outside edge and a V2 cove bit on the inside edge, see Detail A, Fig. 13.

assembly. When gluing these pieces together to form the crown and the base, they have a tendency to slip around before the glue sets. To prevent this, I clamped them together and drilled holes for alignment dowels to hold the pieces steady as they're glued together.

the handle. Before mounting the crown to the case, drill W holes through all three pieces of the crown, counterbor-ing the bottom piece, see Fig. 14. Also counterbore the top (E) of the case so the screws (and handle) can be removed when the finish is applied. Finally, both the crown and the base can be attached to the case using #8 x lW woodscrews.

final assembly. Now the door can be mounted by cutting mortises for the door hinges. Then I installed the plywood back with turn buttons mounted on the back edge of the case sides. And finally, I mounted the clock works, following the instructions that come with them.

finishing. To finish the clock case, I applied four coats of Tung Oil high-luster finish. (Available from Garrett Wade, 161 Ave. of the Americas, NY, NY 10013).

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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