Tenoning

his tenoning jig is built so it rides smoothly but snugly over the tablesaw fence. I installed a quick-action toggle-type clamp (available from Highland Hardware, 1045 N. Highland Ave., N.E., Atlanta, GA 30306)

to clamp the stock to the jig, but a C clamp will work just fine. A dado blade will enable you to cut each tenon cheek in one pass, but a standard tablesaw blade will do fine—it will simply require a few more passes. Set the blade height to the desired tenon length, then set the fence so the blade cuts the first shoul-A tenoning Jig will make der. Flip the piece to cut the task of cutting the other tenon. Be sure tenons on the tablesaw to test your setup first on simple and safe. a piece of scrap. - M.M.

THIS SIDE MECTKMOf CUT

back-support strip

Groove fits over tablesaw fence.

By clamping a fence to the ta ble of you r d rill press, you'll drill the twin mortises more accurately.

grain gluing surface, providing a very strong, mechanical joint.

The top front and back rails and the bottom back rail are joined to the side assemblies by single, vertical tenons in open-ended mortises (see Fig. 1). These open mortises will ease the assembly process later. Note that the bottom front rail has a single, vertical tenon, but its mortise isn't open-ended.

I cut the mortises for the front and back rails on the drill press in the same manner as I cut the mortises for the side rails. Clamp a fence to the drill-press table and cut all the outside mortises on all four stiles first (this will include the top and bottom mortises). Move the fence and cut the inside mortises on each mortise that has a twin (see photo). This will ensure that the spacing between the mortises is consistent. Note also that the mortises for the rear rails arc set back from the rear edge '/« in. more than the front set to allow room for the rabbet that will hold the back (see Fig. 1).

PANEL-RAISING JIG

Groove fits over tablesaw fence.

BUDC OH

THIS SIDE

DIRECTION Of CUT

RAI SED-PANEL PROFILE

Clamp your panel to the panel-raising jig and push It slowly over the saw. Cut the two end-grain edges first, then the long-grain edges, and, presto, you've raised the panel.

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