Feature Project

A This lamp features two bulbs — one in the base and one above. A switch with three settings allows you to turn on the base only, the top only, or both at once.

Lantern-Base Lamp _ _

There's no genie inside this lamp; instead it houses a small bulb that casts a soft, diffuse light. And a wood grid in front of the panels creates a unique design.

01 ne of my favorite childhood memories is of my father digging out an old oil lantern whenever a storm knocked out our electrical power. The whole family would sit huddled around the kitchen table within the warm glow of the lantern, talking and telling stories. Although I never said anything, I was always a little bit disappointed when the power was eventually restored.

This lamp reminds me a lot of that old lantern. A small light bulb illuminates the base of the lamp. But instead of a bright, intense light, paper-covered panels in the sides of the lamp diffuse the light, casting a soft glow.

RICE PAPER. To create this effect, the panels are made out of rice paper (available at most art stores, or see sources on page 35). But because rice paper is fragile, I was concerned that it might get damaged unless it was supported by a backing. So to strengthen the paper we mounted it to some clear Plexiglas.

But that's not the only interesting thing about this lamp. At the top of each frame is a wood "grid" made up of small pieces joined together with half laps. So when the panel is backlit by the light bulb, it creates a windowpane effect It's a simple design that creates a unique lamp.

HALF LAPS. The trickiest part about making the lamp is figuring out a safe way to cut the half laps on all those tiny pieces. The solution we came up with is to make the half laps in "gang" cuts. This just means that we cut the joints on several pieces at one time. (For more on cutting half lap joints, see the technique article on page 12.)

A This lamp features two bulbs — one in the base and one above. A switch with three settings allows you to turn on the base only, the top only, or both at once.

f Construction Details

OVERALL DIMENSIONS: 133A"H x 7V2"W x 7V2"D

3-wire switch controls both light bulbs

For more on cutting half laps, see page 12

Top and bottom are screwed to sides of lamp

Frames are joined with half lap joints

Plexiglas panels are glued to inside of frames with hot glue

Candelabra base holds small bulb

Rice paper

PANEL

(3A" plywood)

Plexiglas

Glue oversize sheet of rice paper to Plexiglas panel, then trim edges

FOOT

MATERIALS

Vertical Dividers (12) 1/4 x V4 - 4% Horizontal Dividers (12) 1/4 x 1/4 - 51/4

BOTTOM -FRAME PIECE

Rabbet is cut around edges of plywood panel to fit opening of mitered frame

8) #4 x 3/4" Fh Woodscrews 4) Rice Paper Sheets 5" x 12" (Rough) 4) 1/8" Plexiglas Panels 45/s" x 113/s" 1) Hickey

1) 13/4"-long Nipple {%" O.D.) 1) W'-long Nipple (%" O.D.) 1) Collar

1) 2 Circuit 3 Wire Brass-Plated Switch 1)2" Candelabra Base 1) Plastic Hold-down w/Nail 1)8 ft. 18/2 Cordw/Plug 1) Brass-plated Harp w/Finial 1) Lamp Shade

CUTTING DIAGRAM

Va" x 4" - 36" Cherry (1 Sq. Ft.)

'////////y

A

B

E

E

NOTE: Also need two 5" x 5" pieces of 3/a"-thick cherry plywood

NOTE: Also need two 5" x 5" pieces of 3/a"-thick cherry plywood

HORIZONTAL DIVIDER

Trim 3/s" off outer vertical -dividers (before assembly)

FRAME STILES (2 blanks)

HORIZONTAL DIVIDERS

(2 blanks)

UPPER FRAME RAILS

LOWER FRAME RAILS

FRAME STILES (2 blanks)

NOTE:

Cut half laps on ends first

VERTICAL DIVIDER

HORIZONTAL DIVIDER

Sides

When I first saw the design for this lamp, it reminded me an awful lot of the box kites I used to make as a kid. And actually, the construction is similar. It's just four frames glued up into a box. The only difference is the gridwork of half-lap trim pieces at the top of each frame, see drawing at right.

BLANKS. The frame that makes up each side includes two rails and two stiles, joined with half laps Then the gridwork inside each frame is made up of three horizontal dividers and three vertical dividers, again joined with half laps. At first glance, you might think this involves cutting half laps on a lot of small pieces. But the process is really a whole lot easier (and faster) if you start by cutting the half laps on wider blanks, and then rip the individual pieces to width.

To do this, I started by making separate blanks for the frame rails (A, B), frame stiles (C), and vertical and horizontal dividers (D, E) out of V4M-thick stock. Shop Note: Some

FRAME RAIL

FRAME STILE

LOWER FRAME RAIL

Trim 3/s" off outer vertical -dividers (before assembly)

Bevel edges of frames after assembly

NOTE: All frame and divider pieces are cut from 'A"-thick stock of the pieces require two blanks, see drawing in margin at left.

When cutting the blanks to length, it's important to make sure the ends are square with the sides. Otherwise, you'll have a difficult time keeping the half laps lined up.

Because the frame pieces are only ^"-thick, I decided to cut the half laps on a router table with a straight bit (see the technique article on page 12). The router leaves a cleaner, more consistent cut than a table saw. But the

NOTE: Cut all half laps on wide blanks first. Then rip individual pieces to width. See drawing of blanks at left.

important thing is to take the time to make several test cuts to check both the depth and width of the half laps.

CUTTING THE HALF LAPS. The first step in cutting the joints is to make the 1/2ll-wide end half laps on both ends of the blanks, see Figs. 1 and la. (Note: The blanks for the vertical dividers receive a half lap on only one end.) This is done by making two passes, clamping a stop block to the miter gauge fence to establish the shoulder of the end half laps, see Fig. la.

Auxiliary Fence

Vs"

HORIZONTAL DIVIDERS

(2 blanks)

Auxiliary fence

UPPER FRAME RAILS

LOWER FRAME RAILS

NOTE: Dry assemble grid in frame while gluing up frame pieces

Place a single drop of glue on each half joint end view

Tilt saw blade to 45°

FIRST: Lay sides facing up edge to edge on flat surface

SECOND: Place strips of masking tape across sides making sure ends are flush

heavy object on grid to hold pieces flat while glue dries

-■«I Strips of ordinary masking tape hold the delicate sides of the lamp together. Just remember to check and make sure the box is square.

NOTE: Tilt blade away from fence

Once the half laps are cut on the ends, you can start cutting the VV'-^ wide half laps that join the grid pieces together, see Fig. lb. These are cut in the same manner, using a stop block clamped to the miter gauge. The only thing is that you'll have to reposition the stop block to create the spacing between the half laps.

RIPPING THE PIECES TO WIDTH. After all the half laps are cut, the individual pieces can be ripped to width from the blanks, see Fig. 2. The important thing here is to make sure the finished width of the pieces matches the width of the half laps, otherwise the pieces won't fit together. (I made my dividers W wide and the frame pieces 1/2" wide, see Figs. 2a and 2b.)

There's one more step to complete before the grid can be assembled. To add a little interest to the grid, I varied the length of the vertical dividers. The center vertical divider of each grid is a little longer than the two dividers on either side, see drawing on opposite page. To create this difference, I trimmed off the end of eight of the vertical dividers.

ASSEMBLY. When it came to gluing the sides up, I used a simple jig to help keep the frames square and flat, see Fig. 3. (For more on this jig, see page 30.) And rather than trying to glue up all the pieces at once, I glued the frame pieces first and then glued the grid pieces into the frames, see Fig. 4. Shop Note: To avoid having to clean up a lot of glue squeeze out, I used a single drop of glue on each half lap when gluing in the dividers.

Before the sides can be glued up into a "box," the edges need to be beveled. To do this, I used atable saw,

-■«I Strips of ordinary masking tape hold the delicate sides of the lamp together. Just remember to check and make sure the box is square.

FIRST: Lay sides facing up edge to edge on flat surface see

NOTE: Dry assemble grid in frame while gluing up frame pieces

SECOND: Place strips of masking tape across sides making sure ends are flush tilting the blade 45° and ripping each sidealongthe edges, see Figs. 5 and 5a.

GLUING UP THE BOX. The sides of the lamp are assembled before making the top and bottom panels. But because the sides are so delicate, I was afraid that using clamps to hold the pieces together might end up heavy object on grid to hold pieces flat while glue dries crushing the "box." So instead, I used ordinary masking tape, laying the frames down in a row and placing four strips of tape lengthwise across them overhanging one side , see Fig. 6. Then after applying glue to the edges of the frames, I simply taped the box together, see photo below.

Place a single drop of glue on each half joint

NOTE: Tilt blade away from fence end view

Tilt saw blade to 45°

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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