Index Plate And

Probably the most unique feature of this box joint jig is the interchangeable index pin. By switching index pins you can accurately cut different size box joints. plates. Each different index pin is glued in position on top of its own carrier plate, see Fig. 9. So cut a number of these index plates (F) from V4 Masonite. Next drill two countersunk holes through each plate to align with the threaded inserts in the front fence. Then, each plate can be screwed to the bottom of the fence as it's...

Cutting Dentil Molding

If you use an indexing system like a box joint jig to cut the dentil molding on the Display Cabinet, you can run into a problem. If the jig isn't set up perfectly, there can be a slight gain (or loss) between each cut that can add up. It doesn't take much error (as little as VW) in the distance between cuts to be noticeable by the time you get to the end of a long workpiece. If there's a gain or loss, the last dentil block won't be the same size as the rest, and you'll be able to see the...

Gun Cabinet

With a few changes, the Display Cabinet shown on page 6 can be used to show off a collection of rifles. upper doors. One major change I made to turn the cabinet into a gun cabinet is the upper doors. To offer a better view, I used a single sheet of glass without dividers in each door instead of eight panes. The stiles and rails remain the same as on the Display Cabinet. locks. Another change on the doors is to add locks. To help keep the guns and ammunition secure, 1 installed locks on the...

Notching For Sawhorse Legs

Building the conventional sawhorse shown in Woodsmith No. 75 wasn't difficult. The only tricky part was cutting the beveled notches for the legs in the top rail. In that issue we showed how to cut them with a hand saw and chisel. But two readers wrote in with neat techniques for cutting quick, accurate notches using the table saw and the radial arm saw. Tom Kolar of I fayette, California suggested cutting the beveled notches on a table saw. To do this, start by ripping 15 bevels along both...

Making Box Joints

A Box Joint Jig solves the biggest problem of making box joints cutting identically-spaced pins and slots. But it's how you set up the jig that determines how well the pins and slots mate. (Step-by-step instructions on setting up and cutting box joints are shown in the drawings below.) prepare stock. I start a box joint project by checking that all the stock is a uniform thickness. Then 1 cut the pieces to length and rip them to rough width to leave about two pins of waste. After all the pins...

Cutting Plywood

One of the most difficult jobs in any home shop is cutting large sheets of plywood. So if you have a good technique for safely and accurately cutting plywood down to size, tell us about iL We'll publish the best plywood cutting techniques and ideas in an upcoming issue of Woodsmith. Winners will receive 100 and a Woodsmith Master Try Square. Duplicate or similar entries will be considered in the order we receive them. Send your ideas (postmarked no later than January 15,1991) to Shop Tips...

Box Joint

I've seen a lot of different box joint jigs over the years. So, when I began to build the Sewing Box for this issue, I decided it was time to design a box joint jig with the features I've been looking for. index pin. Almost every box joint jig I've seen uses an index pin to keep an equal space between the slots in the box joint. But it's usually a pin that's fixed in place on the jig. I wanted a jig with an adjustable pin so you can sneak up on the perfect joint. Another thing about the index...

Tongue Dado

Plan Classic Cabinet

There are many different ways to join shelves to cabinet sides. A full width dado (photo a.) works fine, but if the shelf doesn't fit exactly there will be a gap above the shelf. The tongue and dado joint (photo b.) looks better because it hides any gap above the tongue of the shelf. It also covers up splintering that may occur at the edge of the dado. The next step on the lower case is to add the facing pieces to the side panels, and also add the rails between each facing. SIDE FACING. First...

Lower Case

The display cabinet is constructed by stacking a tall case on top of a short case. Plywood was used for the sides and backs, and then I covered the exposed plywood edges on the front with solid wood strips. The lower case is trimmed out at the bottom with a kickboard and molding strips to give the appearance of having a base. It's an easy way to get the look of a base without the extra steps needed to build one. I began work on the cabinet by building the lower case. It starts out with two...

Positioning Cabinet Shelves

When there are windows on a cabinet with shelves inside (like the Display Cabinet) I think it looks best if the shelves are hidden behind the window dividers. If the shelves are much higher or lower than the window dividers, the effect of too many horizontal lines can look busy. story stick. To get the shelves positioned properly I borrowed a technique used by cabinet installers. The technique involves marking the position of the shelf support pins on a separate marking gauge called a story...

Fixed Plate Back Fence

I started building the jig from the bottom up. That is, I started with the runner. I cut the runner (A) from phenolic plastic (you could use hardwood) to a length of 9, see Fig. 1. But the important thing about the runner is the width it must fit the miter gauge slot of your table saw or router table. fixed plate. Once the runner is cut to width, the next step is to make the fixed plate (B) that the runner attaches to, see Fig. 1. Cut this from W Masonite, then cut a W'-deep groove on the...

How The Jig Works

To set up for a perfect fit between mating workpieces, there are slots in the back fence. This lets you adjust the distance between the index pin and the router bit (or saw blade). interchangeable pin. The index pin is mounted on a carrier plate that can be taken off and replaced with another plate that has a different-size index pin. This way, you can cut joints of variable size. backing plate. Finally, there's the replaceable backing plate to prevent chipout, see Exploded View. This is just a...

Front Fence

The front fence (D) supports the work-piece and holds an index pin plate. And, it's adjustable, so the index pin can be fine-tuned for the best joints. Start by cutting the fence to size from V4-thick hardwood, see Fig. 5. bolts. The front fence is held to the back fence by two carriage bolts and knobs (or wingnuts), refer to Fig. 8. Drill two counter-bored holes for the bolts that align with the slots in the back fence, see Fig. 5a. threaded inserts. The index plate attaches to the bottom of...

The Dividersgrid

The bottom dividers and rails separate the glass panes or panels of the door and hold the frame together. The first step (Step 4) is to cut tongues on the ends of each piece. Then, half-lap joints are cut (Steps 5 and 6), and the pieces are assembled in a grid. Finally, the grid is glued to the stiles (Step 8). To determine the length of the horizontal rails and dividers, begin with the final outside measurement of your door. Then subtract the width of the two stiles, and add W. (This takes...

Waterstone

Hayden of Falls Church, Virginia solved the problem by building a jig that holds the waterstones over the sink while sharpening, see photo. This way all the mess falls into the sink rather than getting all over the workbench. The jig spans the bowl of a sink like a bridge, refer to Fig. 3. Then a waterstone with a wooden base 6000 or 8000 grit is held in position on the bridge between cleats. The other part of the jig is a tray for smaller 800 1200 grit waterstones that usually aren't...

Tray Dividers

I made compartments in each tray using thin dividers. The interlocking dividers also form a lip around the tray to hold the lid in place. cut to sizk. To make the tray dividers M , cut three pieces of W pine to rough dimensions of 2 wide by 16 long. Then resaw and plane the pieces to produce six W-thick blanks. The six blanks can now be cut into twelve pieces that fit inside the trays, see Fig. 21. Rip the pieces to width so when they're placed inside the tray they stand W above the sides, see...