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excess glue from around the joints before setting the pieces aside to dry.

When gluing the front and back assemblies to the side pieces, you will appreciate some help because of the large number of parts. Use a glue with a long open time, such as plastic resin (urea-formaldehyde), so it doesn't

STEP 3: Remove waste between the saw cuts with a sharp chisel, being careful not to pare past the bottom of the bead.

begin to tack before you get all the joints together. Clamp the case securely, check it for squareness and set it aside to dry. When the glue has dried, even up the tops of the legs and rails with a sharp plane.

Making the Top and Drawers

The top of the sewing counter is fairly wide, but you should try to make it with no more than three boards to be in keeping with the original. I had a nice board of delicately figured maple wide enough to make the top from two pieces.

I left the edges of the top square. A slight round-over would be acceptable. but don't mill a complex profile. If you want to be faithful to the original, you can glue a rim around the top using a ruler as the front rim. Refer to the books listed at right for more about the original counter.

Before starting drawer construction, you must attach the drawer runners to the drawer guides. Mill the runners to size and attach them to the guides with glue and screws. The top surfaces of the runners should be ilush with the top edges of the drawer dividers.

I cut all the drawer fronts from a single maple board to keep the figure and color consistent on the front of the counter. The sides, backs and bottoms of the drawers are all made from pine, but poplar or another secondary wood would do.

When laying out drawer parts. I suggest you measure your drawer openings to determine the dimensions of the parts. Make sure to leave some

STEP 4: Miter the leg beads with a sharp chisel using a simple Jig to guide the chisel at 45'. Take incremental passes.

STEP 5: Cut the miters on the rails freehand, fit the rails and make any necessary corrections.

STEP 4: Miter the leg beads with a sharp chisel using a simple Jig to guide the chisel at 45'. Take incremental passes.

headroom for them to expand and contract. The deeper the drawer, the more room you should leave, perhaps as much as % in. on the bottom drawer. As with the panels, the exact amount you leave depends on the moisture content of the wood, the lime of year and other factors. (See aw «54.)

The drawers are made with traditional joinery—hand-cut. half-blind dovetails at the front and through dovetails at the back. (See Fig 3 ) I don't recommend machine-cut joints— you'll lose some of the piccc's traditional charm. (For more on cutting dovetails, see a\x «29.) Before assembling the drawers, drill '/¿-in.-dia. holes in the drawer fronts for the pulls.

Turn the pulls (sec Fig. 3) in pairs on the lathe, then cut the pairs apart. Finish turning the individual pulls in a drill chuck in the headstock. Cut a thin saw kerf into the tenon of each pull for a wedge. After you apply a finish to the

Drill pocket holes in the top rails with a n. Forstner bit, using a simple jig to hold the stock at 15° from vertical.

STEP 5: Cut the miters on the rails freehand, fit the rails and make any necessary corrections.

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