Setting Up With A Combination Square

Finger Joints Woodworking

When it comes time to set up the router bit and add a stop block to the fence, I've found that a combination square often comes in handy. I start by setting the height of the bit. The combination square works best here because it sits flat against the top of the router table, see Fig. 1. Simply flush the edge of the ruler to the bottom edge of the handle. Then set the ruler next to the bit. If I'm making a stopped cut, I also use a combination square to set the stop block, see Fig. 2. Set the...

Mau Organizer

If you have to dig to find your desk, then take a bok at this organizer. Its uncluttered design and simple joinery make it a great project to build. Trying to keep the top of my desk clean is like trying to keep dust off my workbench. Junk mail, memos, magazines, and catalogs seem to settle all too quickly, and before I know it, there's more paper than desk. So recently, I designed this mail organizer. It has a slot on each side for incoming and outgoing mail. In between these slots, there's a...

Bottom For Finger Joint

Carpentry Joints

The curved sides on this box make the fingers look curved too. But the box and the fingers start off square the sides are curved after it's assembled. 1 fs always amazing to me how one JL simple detail can change the whole look and feel of a project. Take this box, for instance. After building several square boxes, I built this small box with its gently curved sides. Now, you might think that these curves would make this box complicated to build, but it's really not. The fingers are cut while...

Portable Workbench Storage

Portable Workbench

I use a portable workbench still be folded up without The front, back, and sides of the box are made out of V2-thick stock, see Fig. 1. The ends of the front and back are rabbetted to hold the sides. Then I also cut rabbets on the top and bottom edges of each piece to hold a top and a bottom made out of W1 hardboard Masonite . After cutting the top and bottom panels to size, I because it's easy to fold up and move around. But it seems like whenever I'm using the workbench on a project around...

End Table

Wood Intarsia Patterns Crosses

The clean lines and basic construction are reminiscent of traditional furniture. But the unusual shape of the legs give this table a modem feel. apered or turned, straight or curved, the legs are the first thing I look at when checking out a table. That's why I like this project. The shape of the legs on this end table are a little out of the ordinary. They make you stop and scratch your head for a minute while you figure out just how they were made. But the real beauty of this project is that...

Stacking Storage Racks

Outfeed Table Saw Plans

The interlocking design of these crates allows you to stack them in different configurations and move them around easily. The interlocking design of these crates allows you to stack them in different configurations and move them around easily. hen I first saw the design for these storage racks sent in by Arnold Baker of Independence, Missouri, they reminded me of the old wooden packing crates farmers used for shipping fruits and vegetables. But as I looked closer, I was intrigued by the way...

Sliding Lid Boxes

Sliding Lid Finger Joint Box

The fingers on these pieces aren't cut all the way to the top edge, see photo in margin and detail 'a' below. What I do is start with the back end of these pieces and count the number of passes I make over the blade thirteen for the box shown below . Then when cutting the front end, I simply make two fewer passes over the blade eleven, in this case . Note The thirteen slots on the back end will become twelve after the waste is trimmed off the top edge. GROOVE FOR LID. Before trimming the front...

Finger joints

Step Step How Finger Joints

The nice thing about building boxes with finger joints is that you don t need any special tools. And you can start and finish a box in a day. fence with a key to index the fingers. FENCE I LEDGE. My auxiliary fence is a piece of stock temporarily clamped to the miter gauge, see drawing below. But I also add a W'-thick hardboard ledge under this fence. This way, the workpiece doesn't ride directly on the table and over the blade insert that may not be flat and level . Instead, the piece rests...

Rub

Tall Routing Fences

I often rout a full roundover along the edges of a workpiece, whether it's a piece of molding or the top of an end table. But this procedure isn't quite as straightforward as you might expect The problem is with the bit's guide bearing. The first pass isn't a problem. There's plenty of surface for the bearing to ride against. But when you flip the piece over to complete the roundover, there's nothing for the bearing to ride against. And the bit cuts a shoulder instead of a smooth roundover, see...

Routing Small Pieces

Small Piece Routing

When routing small pieces on a router table, how do you keep the piece from tipping into the large hole in the table The first thing I do is add an auxiliary table made from hardboard, see drawing. In the center of the hard-board, I drill a hole that's slightly larger than the exposed part of the bit. To secure the auxiliary table, I slide it under the router fence though you can just clamp it down . When routing the piece, I also hold it with wood hand clamps. This way, my hands are never...

Router Push Block

When using a router table without a miter gauge slot, a push block is essential. It keeps pieces square and helps reduce chipout. One push block I like starts out as a rectangular piece of 3A plywood. Then I add a hand hold to the top of the block flush with the front edge, see detail 'a'. And I cut away part of the plywood behind the hand hold. Finally, I added a simple dowel as a push handle. And to keep the stock from slipping, I attach a strip of sandpaper to the front edge.