Hookandloop Sandpaper

Jim Morgans Wood Profits

Wood Profits by Jim Morgan

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American Woodworker APRIL2002 45

• Double-drum height adjustment. The rear drum of a double-drum machine should be easy to adjust. The difference in height between the front and rear drums has to be set just so for optimal performance. Coarse grits require a larger height difference than fine grits. Wed prefer a scale to let you know where you're at in making this adjustment, but none of the machines we tested had one. • Extension tables. Infeed and outfeed extension tables help you avoid snipe on long, heavy stock. Roller stands are impractical for most machines because the bed, not the drum, is adjusted up and down. Some machines don't offer extension tables at all.

9 Changing paper on a drum sander can be a real chore. We preferred designs that make the job easy, such as this Performax tool (it holds the spring-clamp open) and the hook-and-loop system on the Woodmaster.

Drum sanders can be finicky to set up. We like machines with multiple points of adjustment that are easy to get at, such as this Performax drum-angle adjustment handle.

TSC-10C Table Saw-

with tealures such as a targe working surface, powerful American made motor and sturdy construction you'll see we didn t spare quality to make an economical table saw

Miter gauge with T-slot groove • Cast iron extension wings

• Magnetic switch • Quick release plug connection on motor

• 4" dust collection hook up • Large 27" x 40" table

• Beveled front table edge for smooth miter gauge operation

BW-15BS Bandsaw-

don't let its low price toot you, this amazing handsaw is designed and built to provide trouble free operation cut after cut.

• Heavily ribbed, cast iron c-frame

• Cast aluminum wheels with rubber tires • Non-rocking steel floor stand

< Miter gauge • Motor mounted directly to cast iron frame for smooth operation •3/4 HP motor

• Two blade speeds: 2000 or 2600 SFM

BW-15P Planer-

economically" priced yet built I ■'■ :e big professional planers, it offers absolutely vibration tree finishes

• 3 HP motor • 3 v-belt drive from motor to cutterhead • Table moves up and down -

cutterhead stationary for smoother cuts

• Sturdy 4 leg non-rocking stand

• Extended stock support rollers

• Anti-kickback fingers across entire width • 3 spring chip breaker • Heavy cast iron construction • Magnetic switch • Jackscrew knife adjustment

BW-6R Jointer

Acclaimed a testbuf among 6"Jointers by a professional woodworking publication

• 3-knife cutterhead • Jackscrew knife adjustment

• Ngw fence tilts both ways, quick and easy adjustment. 3 positive stops • Enclosed stand • 1 HP motor

• Rabbeting table and ledge • Surface ground tables

• Pushbutton switch

• Cast iron wheels

BW-002A Dust Collector-poffa&fc compact unit can solve your dust collection problems at a very low cost • Two HR single phase motor • 1059 CFM • 43.5 gal. collection bag • Bag attached with quick release metal straps • Metal impeller (not plastic) • One 5" or two 4" dia. hose inlets • 1 micron filter bag

QUALITY MACHINERY • PARTS • SERVICE • GREAT LEASE PLANS

For Information and a FREE catalog contact us by toll free phone: 1-800-235-2100

visit our web page:

www.wilkemach.com

write or visit our showroom:

3230 N Susquehanna Trail, Vbrk, PA 17402-9716

^ACHlNERV JjPOWERTOOLS|

Open-end sanders are well suited for small shops. They take up relatively little room, run on a 115-volt circuit, yet have a large capacity.

Open-end sanders can handle a glued-up top or door that's up to twice the width of the drum (Photo 11). Sand one half first, turn the piece around and run it through again. Does it work? Yes, if your machine is tuned up right. The drum should be tilted ever so slightly. You'll make a very slight crown in the center, but you won't get any overlap marks. You can readjust the drum to sand perfectly parallel with the table again when you're done.

The downside to these machines is their slow speed. You can't take a very big bite with coarser grits, nor can you feed the work as fast as you can with larger machines with bigger motors. And if your work is wider than the drum, you do have to flip it around and take a second pass. 41 4 Open-end sanders can handle stock that's up to twice the width of the drum.

Delta has packed extra features into its open-end sander. It has an additional 2 in. of drum length over the Performax 16-32 Plus, can run at two different drum speeds and is the only machine that accepts an inflatable outboard drum as an accessory. This accessory is perfect for freehand sanding of curved parts.

The extras are attractive, but the Delta didn't score top marks on the basics. The rollers aren't adjustable, the table is awkward to level and attaching the sandpaper requires good dexterity and finger strength. Its motor seemed a bit weaker than the motor on the Performax 16-32 Plus and it draws fewer amps.

Performax 16-32 Plus; $800

This machine has less capacity than the Delta 31 -250, but it scored higher on our performance and convenience tests. It can do everything a drum sander should be able to do except turn out a high volume of work in a short time.

Unlike all the other drum sanders, this machine has a fixed bed and a drum that moves up and down. That means you can use roller stands for additional support of large stock. We took that idea one step farther and mounted this sander in our Ultimate Tool Stand (AW #82, page 48). Now it can handle big, wide and heavy stock almost as well as the larger machines.

Performax 22-44 Pro;

Extra capacity in an open-end machine comes at a pretty stiff price, but this beefed-up machine will handle a wider top than any other we tested. The adjustment for tilting the drum worked quite well.

In addition to extra capacity, the strength of this classic machine is its versatility. It scored well in all of our tests except one category—speed and power. We wish a version with a bigger motor was available.

The casters ($70) and extension tables ($ 100) shown above are optional accessories. This machine is also available in kit form for about $1,350.

Closed-end sanders can handle stock up to 25-in. wide in one pass.

Both ends of the drum are supported in these sanders. This allows the drum to be longer than the open-end machines. You can sand a panel up to 25-in. wide in one pass (Photo 12). That's wide enough for most cabinet doors and sides, but not wide enough for large tabletops. For these, you have to sand one half at a time and glue the two halves together.

These machines require less adjustment than open-end sanders. Once you've set the drum parallel to the bed, you're done. This category is where the power wars really start. The machines we tested are the two least expensive machines in a large field where horsepower, capacity and price go up and up (to over $4,000).

accessories.

Woodmaster 2675; $2,000

This machine is built like a Sherman tank. It's been in production for many years with the same basic, proven design. You want power? This is your sander. You can hog off wood in the coarse and medium grits with ease, even at full width. And you can run the conveyor belt at a higher speed than most other machines. This robust machine handles big and heavy stock better than any other we tested.

Changing paper is easy with Woodmaster's hook-and-loop system. There are no slots or springs to mess with, but you do have to wrap strapping tape around one end of the drum.

The hook-and-loop system has its drawbacks, however. We had to stop the sander and re-wrap the paper after a few passes to take up any slack. The paper is a bit more expensive and its backing cushions the drum, making it softer. Edges can get rounded, which isn't good for surfaces that will be glued together.

Performax Shop Pro 25; $2,200

Although limited in power, the Shop Pro 25 can handle all the jobs we asked of a drum sander. It's ideally suited for a small, non-production shop where each project may require a new task. This sander will surface oversize rough lumber, even up cabinet sides and precisely sand resawn, thin stock. All that and it only recjuires a 115-volt circuit.

The advantages of this sander over its close cousin, the open-end Performax 22-44, are extra width for sanding in a single pass and fewer adjustments to worry about. Unlike an open-end machine, the drum is always set parallel to the bed. Once you've tuned up your machine, you're always good to go.

The casters ($70) and extension tables (S100) shown below are optional accessories.

and pretty much have it ready for hand sanding after only one or two passes. All this work requires a lot of power. Double-

drum machines have 2-hp or larger motors and require 230-volt service.

The downside to having two drums is that setup is much fussier. The difference in height of the rear drum relative to the front drum has to be just so, and that difference varies from grit to grit. Were talking thousandths of an inch here. For optimum performance, drums with coarse grits should have a larger height difference than drums outfitted with fine grits. All this bother is only a one-time deal if you leave vour double-drum machine set up with the same two J 0% Double-drum sanders save sanding and set-up . a]] thg ^ Rut jf usg a ^ vaH of . ,„

te*&£f time by using two different grits in one pass. .. , want a machine with an easily adjusted rear drum.

The whole idea of a machine with two drums is to get work done twice as fast (Photo 13). You can put the same grit on both drums or a medium grit on the front drum and a fine grit on the back drum. With the two-grit setup, you can take a coarse-grained species of wood, such as red oak, straight from the planer and pretty much have it ready for hand sanding after only one or two passes. All this work requires a lot of power. Double-

drum machines have 2-hp or larger motors and require 230-volt service.

The downside to having two drums is that setup is much fussier. The difference in height of the rear drum relative to the front drum has to be just so, and that difference varies from grit to grit. Were talking thousandths of an inch here. For optimum performance, drums with coarse grits should have a larger height difference than drums outfitted with fine grits. All this bother is only a one-time deal if you leave vour double-drum machine set up with the same two J 0% Double-drum sanders save sanding and set-up . a]] thg ^ Rut jf usg a ^ vaH of . ,„

te*&£f time by using two different grits in one pass. .. , want a machine with an easily adjusted rear drum.

These are very similar TJpSjjjj^WBWMjM | machines. They differ 9HHHB9|||^H|^H \

in capacity and power, and you get a lot of power for I

the money with the o

G1066. If the idea of a j, i double-drum machine appeals to you, these are the least expensive models 1

out there. They're good values for a shop that can put them to a dedicated use, such as sanding doors or parts for assembly. One set of grits should be all you need.

There are some downsides to the pair, however. It's a challenge to change the paper. The conveyor belt does not have variable speed or an independent on/off switch. The conveyor belt is made of PVC and requires a fair amount of hold-down force, so these machines don't do well at removing cup from a warped board or panel. It's difficult to change the height of the rear drum relative to the front drum. These are the only machines we tested with drums that rotate in the same direction as the conveyor belt, making a climb cut rather than a shearing cut. This increases the chances of the drum skipping across the surface of a board if you take too deep a cut.

General International 15-250 M I;$ 1,700

This is a serious new entry into the field of drum sanders. It's more expensive than the Grizzlys and comes with better features (changing paper is much easier, for example), but it's still priced well below other double-drum sanders.

The conveyor belt is variable speed, but doesn't have an independent on/off switch. You can adjust die height of the rear drum, but we wish the height adjustment had a simple scale. The depth-of-cut crank works very smoothly and is generously sized. However, one quarter turn raises the bed significantly more than on other machines.

The height of the pressure rollers cannot be adjusted, but the amount of force they deliver can be. At least that's half the battle in dealing with snipe. Eliminating cup from a warped board is still a problem, however, because the machine's rubber belt requires a fair amount of downward roller pressure. Unfortunately, infeed and outfeed extension tables are not available.

Tool Test: DRUM SANDERS Recommendations

A drum sander can be a real time-saver. It's capable of doing far more than just smoothing glued-up panels, but it's not a replacement for a planer and jointer. You can get along fine without a drum sander, but buying one will surprisingly expand the range of woodworking you can do in your shop.

Whether it's an open-end, closed-end or double-drum machine, no single type of drum sander is the best. Each design can fit very well in different kinds of shops.

Two yardsticks can help you sort out the field: performance and convenience. We've graded each machine by these measures in the chart below. Unfortunately, it's clear that no single machine scores high in all categories. Before you buy a drum sander, the question to ask yourself is whether you'd rather have a machine that performs many jobs very well, but slowly, or a machine that performs fewer jobs very fast.

Performax 22-44; $2,200

This open-end sander has a wider range of capacity than any other we tested.

Woodmaster 2675; $2,000

You get amazing power and speed with this closed-end sander, a perennial favorite.

General International 15-250M I; $ 1,700

This new double-drum machine gets the job done quickly without much fuss.

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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