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Round the block co create a new tenon.A circle traced on the end of the block is a helpful guide. You can patiently sand or carve until you get a snug fit, or you can go for a "close enough" fit and glue the joint with epoxy, which will fill any gaps.

Wrap up a worn down tenon

When a joint loosens and begins to wobble, the tenon and socket wear each other down. To enlarge the tenon and restore a tight fit, wrap it with a shaving from your plane. Keep in mind that wear and shrinkage turn round sockets and tenons into ovals. This means you'll have to do some careful sanding to shape the tenon just right.

Through-dowels for loose joints

Drill a hole—or two—through the joint. For a clean hole, clamp a block in place to prevent t ir-out.Also, use a clamp to keep the joint from spreading as you drill.

Drive dowels through the joint. Remember to set the dowels deep enough to allow for plugs.

Through-dowels for loose joints

^ Choosing glue for repairs

Drill a hole—or two—through the joint. For a clean hole, clamp a block in place to prevent t ir-out.Also, use a clamp to keep the joint from spreading as you drill.

Any joint that can be drilled into from one end is a candidate for a through-dowel. This is an easy repair, but leaves holes to plug, so it isn't for cherished heirlooms. You can make your own plugs with a plug cutter ($4 at home centers) or buy them. Face-grain plugs blend with the surrounding wood better than plugs cut from end grain (see Sources, page 55).

Drive dowels through the joint. Remember to set the dowels deep enough to allow for plugs.

Strong and convenient, yellow wood glue is a good choice for most repairs. But there are glues that offer advantages for special situations:

slower glues Depending on factors like temperature and wood species, standard wood glue can set in as little as five minutes. When you need more time for complex assemblies such as chairs, try liquid hide glue or Titebond s Extend, a slower-setting version of yel low gl ue. Roth offer (^gs about twice the open time of regular wood glue (see Sources, page 55).

faster glue Cyanoacrylate, often referred to by the brand name "Super Glue," is perfect for small repairs because it sets in minutes or even seconds depending on the formulation. Instead of finding ways lo

clamp small or odd-shaped parts, you can hold a repair together by hand until the glue sets.

gap-filling glue Although mixing is a pain, two-part epoxy is the best choice for a joint that doesn't fit quite right. Fpoxy makes tfB^ sloppy-fitting joints strong because it becomes a firm, strong-bonding gap filler as it cures. Standard wood glues shrink as they dry and are too brittle to bridge gaps. Polyurethane glue expands to fill gaps, but doesn't cure hard enough to become a sturdy gap filler.

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