Porch Swing

Access Platforms For Staircases

As a holiday gift, a marketable project, or an addition to your own porch, this swing can be built with only a day's worth of labor for as little as fifty dollars in materials. For durability and an antique look, oak was chosen, but whatever wood is selected the porch swing will generate a lifetime of comfort and interest, reminiscent of days that need not remain bygone.

The project is begun by cutting to size parts A, B. and C, which comprise the seat frame. Care should be taken in sawing out the three pieces labeled C, since they will determine the shape or contour of the seat. Butt rails A and B to rails C and join them with pairs of 04" #8 fiat-headed screws. Counterbore %" holes, plug them, and sand flush. Be sure to leave 3" on cither side of A to allow for the arm stumps.

The seat slats can be nailed to the frame using I" wire brads hammered into predrilled holes

"if

-4ZJ

Porch Swing Dimensions

and set below the surface. The dimensions given for parts J will allow about a K«" gap between each slat to take care of swelling and water runoff. Note that the slats will overhang parts C by

Continue by making the back. Cut a X x Yi"-deep groove the length of the rails E. Then cut the corresponding tenons on slats F and G, Don't forget to cut out the heart design, or perhaps another of your own choosing. Assemble the backrest with water-resistant glue, taking care that it does not run onto exposed surfaces, and clamp the assembly. While it is clamped, if time is not to be wasted, the assembly can be joined to the upright supports D using wood screws in counter-bored holes that are plugged and sanded flush. The upper rail should be positioned 1" from the top of the uprights.

Join the uprights to the seat frame with 14 x 3" bolts and hex nuts, the nuts being on the outside. Drill W holes \ W from the back of side rails C and from the bottoms of uprights D.

Cut the armrests and arm stumps to size (parts H and I). If done according to the plan, they will allow the back to tilt approximately 10 degrees from the perpendicular. These two pieces are butted together and held with wood screws covered with wood buttons. The end of the arm should extend IX" beyond the edge of the stump. The other end is screwed to the uprights. The arm stumps are held to the frame with X x 3" bolts.

Twenty feet of double-looped chain will suffice, with the shorter pieces that attach to the arm-stump/seat-frame bolts about three feet in length. S hooks will hold the two lengths together. To remove any stress on the roof of the porch, springs should be used there. Automobile hood springs are excellent for the purpose and can be obtained from an auto wrecking yard at a reasonable price.

The swing was finished with a mixture of a wood preservative such as McCloskey's Rot Fyter and a brown enamel. Mixing will take some experimentation, but if done properly, this treatment will seal the wood, stain it, and give it a gloss in one operation.

BILL OF MATERIALS

Pes.

Key

Part

Req'd

T

w

L

A

scat rail

1

X"

3"

48"

(front)

B

seat rail

1

X"

3"

42"

(rear)

C

seat rails

3

X"

3"

19X"

(side.

center)

D

upright

2

X"

3"

26"

supports

E

backrest rails

2

%"

3"

40X"

(top and

bottom)

F

backrest

8

X"

2"

14"

slats

(includes

tenons)

G

center slat

1

X"

5"

14"

(includes

tenons)

H

armrests

2

X"

3X"

22X"

I

arm stumps

2

X"

y

12"

J

scat slats

10

X"

iv

43"

K

seat slat

1

X*

IX"

This little whale provides plenty of amusing action as his mouth opens and closes and his body pivots up and down when he is pulled. Make a few for gifts, or set up for production and market them to toy and gift shops.

Enlarge the grid pattern on cardboard and transfer the shapes of the tail and body to %" pine or maple. Jigsaw the two separate body sections, terminating in a semicircle with a 1" radius.

The half-lap cuts are started with a 2" hole saw chucked into an electric drill. Locate the pivot point or center of the circle on each part, and start the center bit of the saw into the mark. Cut %" deep, then remove the saw and cut away waste with a chisel.

Test the joint for a loose action by holding the parts together and moving them up and down. Shave a bit from each part until the joint pivots freely. Clean up the joint with sandpaper and secure the pieces with a brass I" #8 flat-headed screw. Drive the screw into a countersunk hole and back off until the joint is free. Then file the protruding tip of screw flush.

The lower jaw is made of pine sandwiched between two pieces of %" hardwood. The center piece should be cut to provide a recess for the upper jaw when the mouth is closed. Drill the pin hole through the main body, making it slightly oversize for a loose fit of a V*" pin. The lower jaw-should be drilled for a light fit over the pin.

Drill the body for a loose fit of the wheel axle. Use a hole saw to cut 2" discs from %" stock. Drill off-center holes part way into each disc, run the axle through the body, and glue the wheels to it. The center hole in the wheels can be plugged.

Give the toy a very thorough sanding and finish with two coats of penetrating-oil finish. The pull cord is inserted into a hole in the top of the head and secured with a small peg glued into the hole.

Tot s Tricycle

This walker tricycle, built of hardwood, will provide many hours of fun and exercise for the tot who has recently started walking.

Start by cutting the seat to shape from %" stock and bore for an easy fit of the 1 "-diameter steering-post tenon. Cut the % x 5 x 8" subseat and attach it to the underside of the seal as shown using glue and four I'A" countersunk flat-headed screws.

Cut rear axle supports from V stock, miter the ends to fit flush against the underside of the seat, and bore for an easy sliding fit of a diameter wooden axle. Attach supports to the sides of the subseat with glue and flat-headed screws.

Wheels are cut from hardwood or plywood and bored for a snug fit over the axles. Both front and rear axles are prevented from shifting sideways by dowel pegs inserted through the axles.

The steering post is in two parts, both of which are square and center-bored for a l"-diam-eter tenon. Chamfer the upper post as shown and drill for the handlebars and tenon. Glue the tenon into the upper post only. Notch the lower post to provide slight clearance for the wheel. The short axle is glued to the wheel and revolves in slightly oversize holes in the post. Drill through the front of the lower post and tenon for a 2" carriage bolt.

Sand all parts carefully and round off all sharp corners to prevent splintering.

Radar Mast

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