Spanish Chest

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A hallmark of Spanish furniture is the use of boldly molded and carved panels. Although at first glance this small table/chest may appear to be a formidable project, it's really fairly simple to build.

Basically, it consists of a case made up of three plain panels and drawers embellished with applied moldings and trim. Since the chest is finished on all sides, it can be used to advantage as an end table alongside an easy chair, or a pair could be used to flank a sofa.

Unless you intend matching the chcsl to other furniture, red oak is probably the best choice of wood for all parts if a stained or natural finish is desired. An antiqued enamel finish is very striking and will hide grain irregularities and other defects. Another visually exciting method of finishing is to combine stain and enamel, in this case the panels and drawer fronts can be stained, while the trim is enameled in dark red. green, or any color that harmonizes with other furnishings.

Begin construction by jointing and edge gluing sufficient stock to form the two end panels C and rear panel D. To achieve flat, stable panels, it's best to use fairly narrow boards of no more than 4" width. The chest is not subjected to heavy use, so it's not necessary to reinforce the edge joints with dowel pins or splines, though many particular woodworkers may prefer to do so. If the edges of the boards are jointed properly in full contact, and care is taken not to overtighten clamps, thus squeezing out most of the glue, a bond stronger than the wood itself can be achieved.

Glue up all three panels slightly oversize, later trimming to final size. It's probably more convenient to add the molding trim to the well-sanded panels at this stage. The nose and cove molding O, shown in Detail A, is a standard type found in most lumberyards. Experienced woodworkers may prefer to cut their own from matching oak. If you use pine molding, sand it carefully and stain a sample length. Commercial pine molding varies widely in its ability to lake a stain evenly. Some of it is so filled w ith pitch streaks or of such wild grain that staining is unsatisfactory. If you plan to paint the molding as a contrast with the stained panels, there will be no problem as long as the molding is well sanded and sealed.

A table-saw miter jig will prove invaluable for achieving perfect mitered corners. All vertical sections of the molding can be held with glue and brads. Horizontal moldings, which cross the grain of the panels, should be fastened only with brads. The panels will shrink and expand slightly in their width so it's best not to restrain this movement.

The two trim strips E are cut to length, and stopped dadoes arc laid out for the two front drawer dividers as shown in Figure 4. Cut these dadoes by hand with a chisel or use a router. Upper and lower rails F and G are joined to the trim strips with glue and dowel pins as shown in Figure 5. When clamping this frame assembly be sure to keep it flat and square.

Apply glue to the front and back edges of the end panels, then add the back panel D and the front frame assembly. Apply pipe clamps and brace the case with strips of scrap to maintain squareness while the glue dries.

The drawer dividers J and the side and rear drawer supports I and K are cut to size and assembled as units with glue and dowel pins. Note that the front dividers are notched for a good fit

Drawer Divider Strips

in the dadoes cut in the trim strips. Counterbore the side supports to a depth of and screw them to the end panels with Vk" round-headed screws. Do not glue the supports to the end panels.

Finishing nails can be driven through the rear panel and into the rear drawer supports, or the rear supports can be counterbored and screwed in the same manner as the side supports. If finishing nails are used, set them so the holes can be filled later.

Six %x%" drawer guides L are cut to length and fastened to the drawer supports with glue. Do not glue the guides to the end panels. The three cleats around the top edge of the case (M and N) are screwed to the panels flush with the top edges. Before fastening, drill slightly oversize holes for round-headed screws to fasten the top.

Base trim H is shaped from %" x 3" x 8' oak. which can be cut with a router and beading bit. The trim is mitered and fastened to the chest front and back with glue and screws driven from the inside. The end trim strips are just screwed in place.

The top is glued up from four or five lengths of 1W oak, trimmed to finish size and edged with

1J4 x \ " oak strips mitered at the corners. Fasten long strips with glue and finishing nails. Short edging is fastened with nails only.

Drawers are constructed of oak, using %" or W stock for the sides and back, %" stock for the drawer fronts and plywood for the bottoms. Ail drawers are flush-fitted in the openings, so it's best to cut the fronts a bit oversize and later trim them for an exact fit.

A dovetailed joint between the front and sides of the drawers is the preferred method of joining; however, the rabbeted and doweled joint shown in Figure 6 is both strong and good-looking. Note that the drawer bottoms are held in grooves cut in the front and sides and are nailed to the bottom edges of the backs.

Cut the beveled trim panels from oak as shown in Detail B and fasten them to the drawer fronts with small brads. Then add the nose and cove molding around the drawer front, flush with the edges and with the coved portion of the molding facing in.

Two small % x % x 2" hardwood stop blocks are glued to each rear drawer support to prevent the drawers from butting against the rear panel. They are glued to the supports about from the rear panel and 2" in from each guide. Fil the finished drawers in place and then determine the exact location of the stop blocks.

The carved rope molding can be obtained from Craftsman Wood Service Company (see p. 243 for the address). This molding is trimmed to fit between the top and the base trim and is glued in place.

Finish sand the piece, breaking all sharp corners. If oak is used, the open grain should be filled. There's some disagreement as to whether stain or filler is applied first. Many different effects can be achieved with the use of natural and tinted fillers. As always, it's best to experiment first on a piece of matching scrap.

In this case, it's recommended that stain be applied first, and when the piece is dry, a filler tinted to match the stain is brushed on. Work one panel at a time so the filler doesn't harden before you can remove the excess. Rub the filter into the grain with a burlap pad, working first against the grain and then with it.

Allow the filler to dry and then apply thinned sealer. After drying overnight, sand with very fine grit paper, working with the grain. Dust carefully and apply two coats of a low-luster sealer. Seal inside the case and the bottom side of the top before screwing the top in place. Finally, add black hammered-finish drawer pulls.

BILL OF MATERIALS

Pes.

Key

Part

Req'd

T

w

L

A

lop

I

IK*

16"

26"

B

top edging

1

VA"

r

8'

C

end panel

14J4"

22"

D

rear panel

I

22"

26"

E

front trim

%"

114"

22"

F

front lower rail

1

r

W

23"

G

front upper rail

1

yt"

23"

H

base trim

1

3"

8'

1

side drawer support

6

%"

\%"

12 Y."

J

front divider

2

%"

1 %"

24%"

K

rear drawer support

3

%"

\%"

24%"

L

drawer guide

6

1414"

M

side top

2

%"

1

>r

cleat

rear top cleat

1

24V

o

nose and cove molding

1

40'

p

rope

1

V,"

Considering the smalt amount of time and expense required to build it, this traditionally styled wall clock is an excellent project. The sturdy, long pendulum movement is powered by a single D-type flashlight battery, though other types of pendulum movements can be substituted.

We built the prototype of pine and it looks so good we'll probably make another of walnut. Oak and cherry are also good choices. You won't need much, but be sure that your stock is well seasoned and flat.

It's a good idea to have the movement on hand before starting. One suitable movement is Klockit's model 204-32, with brass pendulum and 99-0 hands. See p. 243 for the address.

The dial size is determined by the length of the hands. The hands supplied with this particular movement required a dial diameter of 554". You can make your own paper dial, as we did, or purchase one from the suppliers listed on page 243.

Let's start with the %"-thick (actual) case sides A. which are cut to length and width. The curve on the bottom ends can be duplicated by using an enlarged template of the pattern given, or it can simply be drawn freehand.

Locate the lower % x 54" dado that holds the case bottom B. As seen in Figure 1, the case bottom is concealed by the lower part of the door. A Ms x y<" stopped rabbet is marked along the back edge of each side from the top down to the bottom dado. The top ends are also marked for a Vi x W rabbet to hold the case top C.

Rout the dado and rabbets in both sides, then clamp the sides together to cut the bottom curve. Cut parts B and C, rabbeting the back edges as shown in Figure 2.

The case back can be either V," hardboard or plywood, covered on both sides with a suitable veneer. The brass pendulum bob looks especially good against a black-walnut-veneered panel.

If the case is to be stained, it's best to do this after careful sanding but before assembly, to prevent residue from the glue causing uneven staining. After the stain has dried, glue and clamp the case together. Brad the back panel in place to hold the case square. The battery is replaced by removing four screws holding the movement-dial assembly in the case. Make certain the case is perfectly square or you will have trouble fitting the door and mitered top molding.

The door is cut from %" stock (actual). Cut upper and lower frame parts I and J to full width and join them to stiles H with two % x 1" hidden dowel pins at each corner. Be sure to locate the pins on parts H and J so you won't cut into them when shaping the bottom of the frame and glass rabbet.

Glue and clamp the rough frame, taking care to keep it flat and square. After the glue sets, lay out the curves at top and bottom. The inside curve on the frame pattern is used for both parts

1 and J. jigsaw these curves, then use a router and rabbet bit with pilot to cut the rabbet around the inner frame edge as shown in Figure

2 and the detail.

Mark the location of the stopped chamfers on the door frame and use a router or chisel to cut them. Next, prepare the muntin. part K, which is glued up from two pieces as shown in the detail

Mounting-

cl_£at e movement

Speaker Cabinet Building Plans

FRONT ELEVATION

Side v\£vJ, cross SeCTiopJ AT A-Ai

(SLASS

piywooD t>IAL U

FRONT ELEVATION

Side v\£vJ, cross SeCTiopJ AT A-Ai

Mounting-

cl_£at e movement

(SLASS

piywooD t>IAL U

f

/ CASJ

V» çv E:

l" SQUARES

l" SQUARES

i^'me hardwood

of Figure 2. Glue the muntin in place between the frame sides. Add decorative W dowel plugs at the corners, allowing them to protrude slightly.

Sand the completed frame carefully before staining. Cutting the glass to correspond with the curved rabbets is a nice touch, but not necessary, as a square-edge glass will be hidden. The two glass panes are held by four K"-square pine strips bradded to parts H; these are not shown in Figure 2.

Cut the K" hardboard dial panel L and two mounting cleats E. Over panel L is glued heavy white paper with a 5%"-diameter dial and 5Vi"-diameter inner circle. The center of these concentric circles is located as shown in Figure 2 and is below7 the actual center of panel L.

If you prefer to make your ow n paper dial, the dial circles can be inked in with a drafting compass. The numerals, either roman or arabic, can be inked by hand, or transfer-type numerals can be purchased at art and drafting supply shops.

When you've completed the dial panel, drill a %" hole through the dial center. The movement is placed against the back of the panel with the hand shaft extending through the hole. A brass-threaded bushing screwed on the shaft from the front locks the movement in place. Our movement had a plastic mounting fiangc at the bottom, which we screwed to a % x % x 4" pine strip glued to the back of the dial panel to provide additional anchoring of the movement. The hands are a friction fit on the shaft, which is capped with a small knurled nut.

The panel-movement assembly rests on and is screwed to cleats E, which are glued to the case sides. These cleats are located about %" in from the case front. The end of the hand shaft should just clear the door glass.

Now add the molding. We show two styles, bed and crown. If you build your case from pine, you can probably pick up a short length of bed molding at the lumberyard. If a fine hardwood is used, special crown moldings in cherry, oak, and walnut can be ordered from the Craftsman Wood Service Company (see page 243 for the address).

Before adding the molding, glue a stained filler strip F flush with the top front of the case. The molding is then finished and mitered to fit around the case.

A door pull, a small magnetic door catch, and loose-pin butt hinges are added. Mortise the door frame to a depth equal to the thickness of the hinge barrel. The hinge leaf on the case side is surface mounted. Use a couple of small brass mirror hangers to mount the clock level on the wall. Instructions packed with the movement will help you get your movement started and regulated.

BILL OF MATERIALS

Pes.

Key

Part

Req'd

T

W

L

A

side

2

54"

3X"

22X"

B

bottom

1

X"

3X"

8"

C

top

1

X"

3X"

8"

D

back

1

X"

8"

19X"

E

cleats

X"

X*

8"

F

filler strip

!

%"

X*

G

movement

1

H

stiles

IX*

20X"

I

upper frame

1

IX"

6*

rail

J

lower frame

1

X"

2X"

6"

rail

K 0

muntin

I

see detail

L

dial panel

1

X"

7X*

8"

M

front

1

as required

m

molding

N

side

2

as required

molding

Klockit model 204-32

Candle Box

The candle was an important source of light for homes in colonial America. The candle was portable and generated additional light where needed for such popular evening pastimes as reading, quiltm&king, and. no doubt, furniture making. It is generally believed that boxes of this style were hung on the wall and used to store a supply of those valued candles.

Today these quaint boxes are still useful in countless ways. We like to use ours to collect a variety of odds and ends that need to be kept handy. No matter how you choose to use it, though, it's sure to be a most interesting, attractive, and functional wall piece.

Except for the plywood back and drawer bottom, the candle box is made entirely of %" (actual thickness) pine. To begin construction, refer to the drawing and cut the sides to the dimensions shown, keeping in mind that aKxii' rabbet runs the full length of each inside back corner. Next, cut the shelf and the bottom to size (X x 4% x 12"), then the Ji* plywood back to 12M" wide x 12%" high. Cut out the top, front piece, and lid as shown. Note that each of these three parts has a beveled edge, so use care and a sharp plane to make the joint well fitted. The drawer components can now be cut to size and assembled.

Thoroughly sand all surfaces, taking care to remove excess glue squeezed from joints. Use an antique pine stain followed by an antique oil finish, or several coats of a low-luster varnish. Attach the lid with decorative brass hinges as shown. Lastly, fasten the brass drawer pull.

Aeolian Harp Plans

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The Complete Guide To Wood Finishing

The Complete Guide To Wood Finishing

Wood finishing can be tricky and after spending hours on building your project you want to be sure that you get the best outcome possible. In The Complete Guide To Wood Finishing you will learn how to get beautiful, professional results no matter what your project is, even if you have never tried your hand at wood finishing before. You will learn about every step in the wood finishing process from a professional wood finisher with years of experience.

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