Arches Cross Beams

Now that the side assemblies of the garden arbor are complete, it's time to connect these assemblies at the front and back with arches and cross beams, see drawing.

ARCHES. To keep things simple, I made each arch out of two pieces. There are a number of ways to do this, but to make all the pieces identical and keep the waste to a minimum, I made a template.

ARCH TEMPLATE. The arch template starts out as a square hardboard blank (26" x 24"), see Fig. 4. This will create a 26"-tall arch that will be 48" wide after the halves are glued up.

To lay out the arch template, I made a simple compass from a tiiin piece of scrap. A hole for the centerpoint and two for the pencil determine the final size of the curves (26V811 for the top curve, 221/>" for the bottom), see Fig. 4. I used a nail for the centerpoint, holding it against the corner while drawing the curves, see Fig. 4a.

Note that the size of the top curve creates a flat spot at the top of the arch. This is intentional — it lets the arch fit tight against the cross beam later, refer to Fig. 9b on opposite page.

ARCH HALVES. After the template has been cut out and sanded smooth, it can be used to lay out the arch pieces. Each of the four arch halves (F) starts out as a 36"-long 2x12 blank, see Fig. 5. Then after using the template to lay out the pieces, they can be cut out and sanded smooth.

Next, to keep the halves of each arch aligned, 1 added a spline. To do this, I cut a centered groove in the top end of each arch half, cutting it in two passes, see Fig. 6.

Shop Note: To prevent the work-

piece from tipping as the groove is cut I attached an auxiliary fence to the i ip fence and clamped a scrap piece to I he arch to act as a runner, see photo in margin at left.

After cutting the grooves on the arch halves, I cut splines to fit. Hut to prevent the spline from splitting, make sure the grain runs across the joint line, see Fig. 7a.

ARCH ASSEMBLY. Now the arches are ready to be glued together, see Fig. 7. To hold the joint together, I clamped a pair of cleats to each piece and then clamped the cleats together.

Since the arches will be "framed

Arch Support Bands

ARCH HALF

Temporary brace

NOTE: Arch supports cut to fit between bottom of arches and bottom of posts

CENTER OUTER BEAM

ARCH SUPPORT

m cross section

Va" round-over x 3Vi" lag screw and washer

counter-

bore

Template blank

Cut Template

Hold nail against corner of template blank

Cut template from blank and sand smooth

Template blank

Hold nail against corner of template blank

Cut template from blank and sand smooth

Template Routing

Arch , blank in" by the posts and cross beams, it's important that they end up square. One easy way to check this is to make sure the flat edges along the outside are parallel. So before the glue has a chance to set up, measure across the arch assembly at the top and bottom of these flat edges to make sure the dimensions are the same, see Fig. 7. (Mine were 48".)

All that's left to complete the arches is to rout Vfj" roundovers along the curved edges, see Fig. 7a.

CROSS BEAMS. Now, work can begin on the cross beams, see drawing on page 10. Each beam is a lamination of three nearly identical 2x6s: two outer beams (G) and a shorter center beam (H), see Fig. 8.

Before laminating the pieces, I created the mortises for the tenons on the posts. This is easy to do. Just cut two notches in the center beams — the outer beams will form the cheeks of the mortise, see Figs. 8 and 8a. Note: The distance between these notches should equal the final width of the arches (48").

When the notches are complete and the bevels on the ends of the beams are cut, I began gluing and screwing the beams together. But work from outside in so the screws end up on the inside faces, see Fig. 8b. (And be sure to offset the screws.)

When the glue is dry, all that's left is to rout a Vs" roundover on the edges and drill counterbored pilot holes so you can "pin" the tenons with lag screws, see detail 'a' in drawing at left.

The trick to adding the arches and beams to the posts is standing the posts upright. But there's an easy solution. What I did was to temporarily clamp braces across the posts, see drawing on page 10.

ARCH SUPPORTS. With the beams and arches screwed in place, I added arch supports (I) to the inside faces of the posts, see drawing and Fig. 9. These extend from the arches to the bottoms of the posts. (Mine were 58" long.) And they match the bottom ends of the arches (l1// x IV2" with roundovers on their outside faces).

When the arch supports are complete, they're simply screwed to the posts, see Fig. 9a.

end view

Centerbeam Drawing

NOTE: Flip piece between end view

ARCH

Cleat

Centerbeam Drawing

Rout 's" roundover

Note grain direction of spline

NKJIC: Miiei assembly, rout Va" roundover on curved edges only

Rout 's" roundover

Note grain direction of spline

ARCH

Cleat

NKJIC: Miiei assembly, rout Va" roundover on curved edges only

After assembly rout Va" roundover

Curved Arbor Top

(5) Outside beam ® Center beam (GJ Inside beam

Offset screws top section -

view

FIRST: Screw center SECOND: Screw inside beam to outside beam beam to center beam

W-dia. counterbore, Vf deep

After assembly rout Va" roundover

W x 3V2" tag screw

NOTE: Offset screws when assembling beam

(5) Outside beam ® Center beam (GJ Inside beam

Offset screws top section -

view

FIRST: Screw center SECOND: Screw inside beam to outside beam beam to center beam

Va" x 3Vi' lag screw with washer \

Cross With Two Beams Saint Norbert

#8x3" Fh woodscrew

NOTE: Cut arch supports after screwing arches in place

Va" x 4" lag screw with

Va" x 3Vi' lag screw with washer \

W-dia. counterbore, Vf deep

#8x3" Fh woodscrew

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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Responses

  • Aatifa
    How to cut the arch when making a arbor?
    6 years ago
  • Feorie
    How to build garden arbours and arches?
    6 years ago

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