Step

With the base of the stool completed, building the slide-out step is simple. That's because the step is basically just a scaled-down version of the base. The only major difference is the stop system that is part of the top. But more on that a little later.

SIDES. Like the base, 1 started out building the step by gluing up a couple of %"-thick blanks for the step sides (D), see drawing at right. Then after cutting these to size (14" x 7l/i"), I cut the mortises for the rails.

The step sides (D) match the profile of the base sides (A). They're angled and have a curved cut-out at the bottom. So this time, I didn't have to do any measuring for the layout — I just traced them, see detail 'a'.

After cutting the sides to shape and sanding the edges, I routed a bull-nose profile on all but the top edges, to match the bullnose on the base.

RAILS. The step sides are joined by a pair of step rails (E). These pieces are cut to size and tenons are cut on the ends to fit the mortises in the sides. But since this distance will determine the final width of the step, the important thing to watch here is the shoulder-to-shoulder distance of the tenons (12%" in my case), see detail 'b'.

After cutting the tenons, I dry assembled the sides and rails to make sure the step fit between the sides of the base with just the right amount of clearance. There should be an Vs" gap between the base sides and the step sides, see detail 'b' above.

Once I was satisfied with the fit of the step, I took it apart and drilled countersunk screw holes in the rails (to attach the step top). Then I cut out the curves on the bottom edge of each rail and sanded them smooth.

TOP. After gluing up the step sides and rails, I turned my attention to making a top for the step. Like the top on the base, the step top (F) starts off as a glued-up blank, see Fig. 4. But the dimensions are slightly different (14" x 15"). The top uses a simple system of stops to limit the step's travel. When the step is pulled out, a back stop hits the stop pins and keeps the step from being pulled all the way out of the base. And when it's pushed back in,

Cut stops to fit in slots in ends of top

NOTE: Front and back stops are cut from a single blank

'// radius on bottom edges

FIRST: Cut slots on ends of top auxiliary fence

BACK

STEP Fh woodscrew RAIL

stops at the front of the top prevent the step from being pushed in too far.

These stops are fitted into slots that are cut on the sides and back edge of the top, see Fig. 3. First I cut the W-wide slots on the ends of the top, see Fig. 3a. Then I raised the blade and cut a deeper slot along the back edge of the top, see Fig. 3b.

STOPS. The stops are cut from a single 2"-wide blank that is thicknessed to match the width of the slots in the edges of the top. I cut the two front stops (G) to width first, but I left them a little long (5") at this point.

The front stops ensure that tire step will be centered in the base when it's pushed all the way in. To determine the length and position of these stops, just slide the step top into the base, center it from front to back and insert the stops in the slots until they touch the stop pins, see Figs. 5 and 5a.

After marking the length of the stops, they can be removed, cut to size, and then glued back in place.

BACK STOP. The back stop (H) is a little different. It gets screwed in place rather than glued, see Figs. 6 and 6a. This way, you can remove it in order to get the step in and out of the base for finishing or repair. (Note: The back stop is screwed in place from the underside of the top.)

After screwing the back stop in place, the curves can be laid out, cut, and sanded smooth. Then I routed the same bullnose profile on the front and back edges of the top.

ATTACHING THE TOP. When it came time attach the top to the sides and rails of the step, I wanted to make sure that the sides of the step would line up with the sides of the base. To do this, I removed the back stop and centered

the step top in the base. Then I marked the location of the screw holes on the underside of the top. Now the side and rail assembly can be glued and screwed to the step top, see Figs. 7 and 7a.

Finally to finish the stool, I removed the back stop and step and applied a golden oak stain. Then I wiped on three coats of an oil finish. EES

MATERIALS

D Step Sides (2) 3/4x71/4-14 E Step Rails (2) 3/4 x 21/2 - 14V4 F Step Top (1) 3/4x 14- 15

G Front Stops (2) V4 x 1/2 - 5 rgh. H Back Stop (1) V4x2-15

CUTTING DIAGRAM

W x 5VZ - 96" Oak (3.66 Bd. Ft.)

A

A

A

A

A

A

74

V/

3A" x 5Vi" - 96" Oak (3.66 Bd. Ft.)

s

B

6, H

s

t !

£ V/M

Front stop

FRONT STOP

Front stop

NOTE: Insert buck stop in top before cutting curve and routing edge

NOTE: Insert screws into bottom side of top piece

STOP

STOP

NOTE: Insert buck stop in top before cutting curve and routing edge

NOTE: Insert screws into bottom side of top piece

NOTE:

Align edges of step with edges of base

NOTE:

Align edges of step with edges of base

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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