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pocket at all times, and hone my skews frequently while turning.

With the fine India stone, I often "set up" the edge of the skew for a critical finishing cut. Honing creates a mien» wire edge on the edge opposite the last side you've honed. This micro-edge can be made to work for the turner on especially fine cuts, or against him if he doesn't know it's there. Simply finish cut on the side opposite the last side honed. A little experimentation will show you the difference in the cut.

Scrapers

Scrapers come in a bewildering variety of configurations but they share a common principle. A wire edge on the top side of the scraper does the cutting. (See drawing.) The sharper the wire edge, the better the cut. The problem is that the cutting action and the friction it produces wear down a wire edge quickly.

I sharpen scrapers on the bench grinder. For small-radius scrapers, I hold the tool on the rest and grind the bevel lightly, swinging the handle in an arc to grind the entire edge. (I shoot for a bevel angle of about 45°.) This raises a wire edge on the top side of the scraper, bight pressure and frequent cooling produce the best results for me. Heavy pressure produces a burnt edge, which will break down quickly.

I burnish flat scrapers and large-radius curved scrapers much like a cabinetmaker's hand scraper. After grind-

Even high-s|H'e<l steel skews are easy to burn. Author prefers a water-cooled grinder with an alumiiiuiii-oxide wheel. He uses the tool rest to determine the bevel angle.

ing the bevel, I polish the wire edge back down toward the front of the chisel with the buffing wheel. This gives me an acute angle on the end of the scraper. Then I make one pass along the edge with a piece of hardened steel to burnish a wire edge on the top side of the tool. This burnished edge is sharper than a wire edge of the grinder and outlasts a ground wire edge. It takes a little practice to get this to work, but it's worth the time invest-

Author burnishes flat scrapers and large curved tierapcr* much like a cabinetmaker's hand seraper. He grinds the bevel then polishes the wire edge back down toward the front of the tool with the buffing wheel (left). Then he makes one pass along the edge with a piece of hardened steel to burnish a wire edge on the top side of the tool.

Author burnishes flat scrapers and large curved tierapcr* much like a cabinetmaker's hand seraper. He grinds the bevel then polishes the wire edge back down toward the front of the tool with the buffing wheel (left). Then he makes one pass along the edge with a piece of hardened steel to burnish a wire edge on the top side of the tool.

ed. Remember, you only get one try at setting up the edge. If it doesn't work, you have to regrind slightly and repol-ish before trying again. Repeated burnishing passes will only roll the edge-back out of useful range. Some scraper profiles are difficult to burnish easily. But for fiat or large-radius round scrapers, burnishing works well.

Other Tools

Parting Took—The parting tool is sort of a hybrid; a cross between a scraper and a cutting tool. If the edge-is held tangent to the workpiccc, with the- bevel nibbing, it's cutting. If it's fed straight into the workpiccc at or slightly above the centerline, it's scraping.

Parting tools come in several varieties: fiat, diamond cross-section and "spurred." The flat and diamond variety have two bevels, and are ground on both. The specialty spurred parting tools (available from Craft Supplies USA, see Sources) are sharpened on only one face. On diamond-shaped parting tools, be sure to keep the cutting edge in the center so the tool won't get stuck in the cut. The bevels on a parting tool may be either flat or hollow ground.

When you're grinding a parting tool, the* two bevels should meet at an angle of approximately 50°. If you use the cutting technique exclusively, it's possible to exaggerate the bevel slightly into a more "fishtailed" shape. (Sec drawing.) It will give a cleaner cut, but will break down too fast if used for scraping.

I grind parting tools by lowering the bevel onto the wheel as though parting it with a cutting technique. Try to match the bevel of the tool, and keep light contact. Watch for the fine sparks at the cutting edge, and cool frequently.

Beading Tools—Traditional beading tools (not the shaped scrapers also called beading tools) are cutting tools used much like skews for cutting beads and shoulders. They're essentially oversized. flat parting tools and are sharpened in much the same way. Both bevels are ground to produce the edge.

I grind flat bevels on beading tools because they give me more control than a hollow-ground bevel. I grind on the flat sides of the wheel rather than the front edge. An abrasive belt system

sources

Turning tools and sharpening equipment for turners are available from:

> CRAFT SUPPLIES USA, 1287 F. 1120 S., Provo, UT 84601, (801) 373-0917. chicle «¿id t GARRETT WADE CO., 161 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NT 10013, (800) 221-2942.

t HIGHLAND HARDWARE,

1045 N. Highland Ave. N.E., Atlanta, GA 30306. (800) 241-6748.

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> LEE VALLEY TOOLS LTD.,

1080 Morrison Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K2H 8K7, (613) 5960350.

t WOODCRAFT, 210 Wood County Industrial Park, Box 1686, Parkersburg, WV 26102, (800) 225-1 153. < IRCLE «614

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