Box Template Pattern

3V2"

SECRET BOX TEMPLATE PATTERN

NOTE:

Half-template shown full-scale

When planing the stock for the indexing plates used for the top and bottom, attach the stock to a %" plywood carrier with double-sided tape. The plywood supports the thin stock as it's planed preventing it from getting chewed up by the force of the planer knives.

When planing the stock for the indexing plates used for the top and bottom, attach the stock to a %" plywood carrier with double-sided tape. The plywood supports the thin stock as it's planed preventing it from getting chewed up by the force of the planer knives.

FRONT SECTION VIEW

Center counter-bore on end of the box

- Counter-bore

Stop block

FRONT SECTION VIEW

pair of rare-earth magnets to the bottom lock it in place. Each magnet is held in a small cup pressed into a hole at each end of the base (Fig. 2).

For the magnets to work, they need something to grab onto. So I

drilled a counterbore at each end of the box, as in Fig. 3a, and installed a pair of special, countersink washers. The holes and counterbores are centered on the thickness of the box "walls," as shown in Fig. 3. S3

Stop block

Center counter-bore on end of the box

- Counter-bore

¡tii Fence

END VIEW

SIDE

TOP VIEW

Sides and back joined with tongue and dado

Plan Nightstand

Bullnose all four edges of top and bottom

Case is assembled with screws to accommodate wood movement

FOOT

Rout bullnose only on the ends ffö x ¿ -/4 Fh woodscrew

Drksskr-Top V\let

This classy organizer features a small drawer and a divided tray top.

JLr ake a look at this dresser-top valet. It's a basic case with straightforward construction. Whaf s different is the top of the case. It features shallow "wells" to hold the stuff that collects in your pockets during the day and needs a place to rest when you come home, shown in the photo.

top and bottom. The top and bottom of the case are glued-up panels with a bullnose routed on all four edges, as shown in Fig lb.

To make the shallow wells in the top, I used a special tray bit in a router guided by a template. Use the pattern shown on the opposite page to make the template. You can learn more about template routing by reading title article on page 6.

making the case sides. The sides and back are cut to size from 1/211-thick stock. A bullnose is routed on each end of the sides to match the top and bottom, as in Figs. 1 and lb.

Sides and back joined with tongue and dado

TOP VIEW

¡tii Fence

Vz" round-over bit

Rout bullnose only on the ends ffö x ¿ -/4 Fh woodscrew

Bullnose all four edges of top and bottom

END VIEW

SIDE

Case is assembled with screws to accommodate wood movement

FOOT

SIDE SECTION VIEW

3/i6"-dia. shank hole

FOOT

Rout tray recesses

SIDE SECTION VIEW

3/i6"-dia. shank hole

FOOT

Rout tray recesses

#8x2%" Fh woodscrew

#8x%" Fh woodscrew

I used a tongue and dado joint to connect the sides and back of the case. To make the joint, a dado is cut near the back of each side piece, then a matching tongue is cut at each end of the back, as in Fig. la. With the joints cut, the sides and back can be glued together.

box assembly. I was looking for a simple way to attach the top and bottom to the sides of the case. The trouble is, this is a cross-grain joint. And there's no way glue will stand up to seasonal movement.

The solution to this problem is to use long screws to pin the top and bottom to the sides, as in Fig. 1. The holes in the sides are oversize, which allows the sides to move independently from the top and bottom, as shown in Fig. lc.

Small, wood feet are screwed to the bottom to complete the case, as in Fig. lc. To make them, I routed the bullnose on an oversize blank first, then cut them to final size.

BUILDING A SIMPLE DRAWER

With the case complete, you can begin working on the drawer. As you can see in Fig. 2, it's just a basic drawer with tongue and dado and locking rabbet joinery.

Ice Damming Soffit

The tongue and dado is straightforward enough to make. The joint is cut just like the one that joins the side and back of the case (Fig. 2b).

cutting a locking rabbet. I used a locking rabbet to join the front and sides of the drawer, as you can see in Fig. 2a. I did it this way because it's a stronger joint for the front.

You could also use a drawer joint bit in the router table to make this joint. To see how, turn to page 34.

After cutting the joinery, the next thing I did was cut a W groove near the bottom edge of all the parts. This groove will hold a 1A" plywood bottom, as shown in Fig. 2c.

final assembly. The final piece to make is the plywood drawer bottom, as in Fig. 2. It's sized to fit in the grooves in the drawer parts. Then all that's left to complete the valet is to screw a pair of brass knobs to the drawer front. 03

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