Planning Ahead

Installing Special Items Prior to Wall Framing

After the main floor system is completed, and prior to the framing of exterior walls, careful consideration should be given to any special items which need to be installed. One-piece bath or shower units and other large fixtures or equipment that cannot pass through door or window openings must be placed within the building before walls are erected. Similarly, exterior £ chimneys and chases may also have to be completed before walls are [■ framed. In some cases, such as internal masonry fireplaces supporting vB roof structural members, it is necessary to have these constructed v, prior to wall framing in order to avoid interfering with this work.

The following items pertaining to the planning and coordination of trades prior to wall framing should be reviewed before starting any construction.

Review plans and specifications carefully to identify any special items which have to be installed prior to wall framing.

I -* Order and arrange for delivery of these special Items well in advance of j wall framing to avoid delays.

I Coordinate with trades responsible for constructing fireplaces, chimneys | and chases to maximize productivity and minimize conflicts.

j By carefully planning ahead, proper installation without delays and trade

! conflicts is possible. Failure to plan ahead may require that some special

| items are substituted with less suitable items, or altogether omitted from j the house.

added. This second top plate usually laps the first plate at the corners and partition intersections and, when nailed in place, provides an additional tie to the framed walls. Where the second top plate does not lap the plate immediately underneath at corner and partition intersections, these may be tied with 0.036 in. (0.91 mm) galvanized steel plates at least 3 in. (75 mm) wide and 6 in. (150 mm) long, nailed with at least three 21/2 in. (63 mm) nails to each wall.

Interior partitions supporting floor, ceiling or roof loads are called loadbearing walls; others are called non-loadbearing or simply partitions. Interior loadbearing walls are framed in the same way as exterior walls. Studs are usually 2 x 4 in. (38 x 89 mm)

lumber spaced at 16 in. (400 mm) on centre. This spacing may be changed to 12 in. (300 mm) or 24 in. (600 mm) depending on the loads supported and the type and thickness of the wall finish used. (See Table 20.)

Partitions can be built with 2x3 in. (38 x 64 mm) or 2 x 4 in. (38 x 89 mm) studs spaced at 16 or 24 in. (400 or 600 mm) on centre depending on the type and thickness of the wall finish used. Where a partition does not contain a swinging door, 2 x 4 in. (38 x 89 mm) studs at 16 in. (400 mm) on centre are sometimes used with the wide face of the stud parallel to the wall. This is usually done only for partitions enclosing clothes closets or cupboards to save space. Since there is no vertical load to be supported by

Multiple stud arrangements at exterior corner. In the two-stud arrangement, a plasterboard clip is used at the corner for support.

Three stud

Two stud

Three stud

Two stud

gypsum board clip insulation corner studs bottom plate subfloor end joist sill plate foundation gypsum board clip insulation corner studs bottom plate subfloor end joist sill plate foundation

Multiple stud arrangements at the intersection of an interior partition with an exterior wall: (A) two studs used; (B) bracing or blocking is used; (C) the partition is attached to exterior wall after drywall has been installed; (D) insulation must be installed before sheathing is applied.

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j

J

polyethylene strip partition stud insulation in spaces between blocking spaced blocking bottom plate subfloor end joist sill plate foundation

Horizontal nailing support for interior finish. Nailing support provided by 2 in. (38 mm) lumber nailed to top plates with 3 in. (76 mm) nails at 12 in. (300 mm) on centre.

ceiling joist

2" x 6" (38 x 140 mm) nailing support polyethylene air/vapour barrier strip (may also be installed between top plates - not required between floors)

ceiling joist

2" x 6" (38 x 140 mm) nailing support polyethylene air/vapour barrier strip (may also be installed between top plates - not required between floors)

End-wall framing and nailing support for interior finish using platform construction method.

End-wall framing and nailing support for interior finish using platform construction method.

floor joist

wood nailing support for interior finish partitions, single studs may be used at door openings. The top of the opening may be bridged with a single piece of 2 in. (38 mm) lumber the same width as the studs. These members provide a nailing support for wall finish, door frames and trim.

Multiple-stud post made up of at least three studs, or the equivalent, is generally used at exterior corners and intersections to secure a good tie between adjoining walls and to provide nailing support for the interior finish and exterior sheathing. Corners and intersections, however, must be framed with at least two studs.

Figures 43 and 44 illustrate commonly used exterior corners and partition intersections.

Nailing support for the edges of the ceiling finish is required at the junction of the wall and ceiling where partitions run parallel to the ceiling joists. Figures 45 and 46 illustrate the types of nailing support commonly used.

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