How to Buy a

9.6-Volt Drills

These drills are generally much smaller and lighter in weight than higher-voltage models. They usually have fewer features, as well. 9.6-volt drills have adequate power for most jobs in the woodshop, whether you're drilling holes or driving screws. This combination of weight and power makes compact 9.6-volt drills a favorite among many woodworkers. They are particularly good for drilling small-diameter holes and installing hardware because they're easy to control. But a 9.6 doesn't have enough guts to do other big jobs around the house, such as driving lag bolts and drilling holes for pipes.

Makita 6226DWE;$ 132.

9.6-volt drills have the power you need for most furniture-making jobs, but can bog down under the larger torque requirements of garden furniture projects or carpentry jobs.

Makita 6226DWE;$ 132.

9.6-volt drills have the power you need for most furniture-making jobs, but can bog down under the larger torque requirements of garden furniture projects or carpentry jobs.

Extra weight can be tiring. If you're buying a drill to be used almost exclusively in the shop, go for the lighter 12 volt. But if this is the only cordless drill you will own, and you plan to press it into duty for carpentry jobs, buy a 14.4- or 15.6-volt drill.

18- to 24-Volt Drills

Heavy, large and powerful: these are the distinguishing characteristics of this class of drills. They're a favorite of professional carpenters and others in the building trades, but if you need lots of continuous power for big jobs, a corded drill is a better and less-expensive choice.

Turn to this group of drills to supplement a smaller voltage drill, not as a first choice. Drills this large are more than you need for most woodworking jobs. They're perfect for driving a lot of deck screws or lag bolts but too unwieldy for more delicate work.

Bosch 32612; n/a.

12-, 14.4- and 15.6-volt models are our candidates for the best all-around shop drills. 12-volt models weigh less than the others but still have plenty of power for all but the most demanding jobs, such as drilling metal and concrete.

Bosch 32612; n/a.

12-, 14.4- and 15.6-volt models are our candidates for the best all-around shop drills. 12-volt models weigh less than the others but still have plenty of power for all but the most demanding jobs, such as drilling metal and concrete.

Features

As far as feel and convenience go, it's hard to go wrong buying a cordless drill. We tested all the 12-, 14.4- and 15.6-volt drills on the market and found more similarities than differences.

All the manufacturers have arrived at a common, basic design that works extremely well. Almost every drill includes a keyless chuck, removable battery, multiple clutch settings, a center-mounted handle, a reversing switch located near the trigger, two speed ranges (low speed delivers more torque) and a variable-speed trigger.

The following features made the difference between good drills and superior ones for use around the woodshop:

Weight

Lighter is better. We preferred drills that weighed 5 lb. or less.

Porter-Cable 9826; $200.

18-volt and larger drills are mighty powerful, but you'll be surprised when you pick up most of them. Man, are they heavy! They're just the ticket for construction work, but overkill for the woodshop.

Porter-Cable 9826; $200.

18-volt and larger drills are mighty powerful, but you'll be surprised when you pick up most of them. Man, are they heavy! They're just the ticket for construction work, but overkill for the woodshop.

WISmßBmaSmm

We were delighted with easy-to tighten, one-handed chucks. Getting a firm grip on a bit requires only a simple turn of the wrist.

One-Handed Chuck

We loved chucks that allow you to safely tighten and loosen a bit with only one hand (Photo 1).

Ratcheting Chuck

Chucks that ratchet tight on a bit or driver are a new feature. These chucks are far less likely to lose their grip on a bit than standard chucks.

Handle Size

Drills with large handles may not be comfortable if you have small or medium-sized hands (Photo 2).

Rubber Grip

Softer handles are more comfortable than ones made from hard plastic.

Chuck Capacity l/2-in. chucks are convenient but not essential. Many large bits have stepped-down shanks.

Batteries

You'll want two, and most drills come supplied with an extra. Batteries come in two types; the older, standard nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) and a newcomer, nickel-metal hydride (NiMH). Ni-MH batteries offer longer run times than Ni-Cd batteries, but take fewer charges over their lifespan. Both types should be recycled.

Amp-Hour Rating

This number is a rough indication of a battery's run-time. It's important if you work far from a charger, but in the shop, where you have a second battery ready to go, small difference in amp-hours between models don't make much difference.

What's New?

After we tested cordless drills, DeWalt upgraded their basic 12- and 14.4-volt models. The 12-volt DW927K-2 ($140) and the 14-volt DW928K-2 ($170) are much lighter and smaller than the more expensive models we reviewed. They have ratcheting chucks, so bits won't come loose, but the chucks aren't one-handed. You get two speeds, two batteries and a diagnostic charger. Both drills are an excellent choice for the woodshop.

DeWalt DW927K-2, 12 volt; $140.

Chargers

One-hour chargers that evaluate the condition of your battery are the way to go (Photo 3). Slower chargers, on less-expensive drills, are not only inconvenient, but you must unplug them after the battery is charged to maximize its life.

Handle size varies a lot. No matter how good a drill is in other respects, a handle that feels too large is a deal-breaker for many people.

We prefer drills with one-hour chargers.They typically contain sophisticated electronics to maximize a battery's life. You can store an extra battery in the charger, which is very convenient because you'll always have a battery ready to go.

monitoring light battery monitoring codes

We prefer drills with one-hour chargers.They typically contain sophisticated electronics to maximize a battery's life. You can store an extra battery in the charger, which is very convenient because you'll always have a battery ready to go.

monitoring light battery monitoring codes m r-I r-T'

How To Sell Furniture

How To Sell Furniture

Types Of Furniture To Sell. There are many types of products you can sell. You just need to determine who your target market is and what specific item they want. Or you could sell a couple different ones in a package deal.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment