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6-6 Continue cutting notchcs in the second board in the same manner that you cut them in the first. When you fit the boards together, the fingers and notches should interlock, and the edges of both boards should be flush. If the joint is too light, move the stop toward the dado cutter slightly. If its too loose, move it away.

size stop. This will enable you to cut different sizes of finger joints.

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Finger-Joint Jig

This jig will evenly space notches as you cut them, allowing you to make finger joints. Its designed to mount on any miter gauge, and will work on both a table saw and a router table. Make the face and the mount from cabinet-grade plywood, and the stop from hardwood. If you wish, make several different faces, each with a different

To use the jig, screw or bolt the mount to a miter gauge. Loosen the wing nuts that secure the face to the mount and slide the face sideways until the stop is the proper distance away from the bit or cutter. When the stop is positioned properly tighten the wing nuts.

through-dovetail joints

Through-dovetail joints have fascinated and frustrated woodworkers for ages. Although there are several different ways to cut them with power tools, no one has yet developed a machine or a fixture to make "classic" dovetail joints — the wide, graceful tails and narrow, delicate pins that have become the hallmark of fine, hand-built furniture. (See Figure 6-7.) Careful, patient handwork with a chisel and a dovetail saw remains the only way to make this joint. (See Figures 6-8 through 6-18.)

However, there are several simple jigs that will help you through this handwork — the Layout Rule, Slope Gauge, and Chisel Guide. You'll find the plans for all three of these jigs in "Dovetail Aids" on page 90.

Before making a dovetail joint, decide which part to cut first — the pins or the tails. Craftsmen will argue the point at great length. I prefer to make the tails first, then use these as a template to mark the pins. (1 find it more difficult to use the pins to mark the tails.) Here are several additional tips:

■ Make sure that your chisels are razor sharp. Some craftsmen keep a set of finely honed chisels that they use only for making dovetail joints.

■ Choose clear, straight-grained wood for the members. It's very difficult to hand cut dovetail joints in figured wood. Also, the grain must run lengthwise through the pins and tails.

■ When you lay out the pins and tails, clearly mark the waste so you don't accidentally remove the wrong part of the board.

■ Keep the slope of the pins and tails between 8 and 12 degrees. If the slope is less than 8 degrees, the pins won't remain wedged between the tails as firmly as they should when the joint is subjected to racking stress. If it's more than 12 degrees, the cheeks of the tails become fragile and will shear off. This makes the joint more susceptible to shear stress.

■ Always cut on the waste side of the layout lines. This will ensure that the joints fit tightly. It's much easier to shave a little stock from the pins of a dovetail joint that fits too tight than it is to shim the pins of a loose joint.

■ Make both the pins and the tails about V32 inch longer than the thickness of the adjoining boards. After assembling the joint, sand the outside surfaces flush.

6-7 All dovetail joints consist of two parts. The tails (1) are cut into one of the adjoining members, and the mating pins (2) are cut into the other. Traditionally, dovetail joints have split pins or half pins (3) at the top and bottom edge — tails are not usually split. Each of the tails, pins, and half pins are tiny tenons with angled cheeks (4) and square shoulders (5).

6-8 To make a through-dovetail joint — or any dovetail joint — first mark the spacing of the dovetails. Decide how many tails you want to cut across the width of the tail board. For example, if you want to cut five dovetails (five tails and six pins) across the board, hold the Layout Rule (see page 90) at an angle, using five spaces — no more, no less — to span the width. (For small dovetails, use the edge on which the lines are 1 inch apart;

for larger dovetails, use the side on which the lines are IV2 inches apart.) Place the holder against one edge of the board and slip it onto the rule, gripping the rule at the proper angle. Keeping the holder against the board's edge, slide the rule toward the end of the board. Where each line on the rule crosses the end, make a mark on the board. When you're finished, there should be four marks on the end of the board, dividing its width into five equal sections.

6-7 All dovetail joints consist of two parts. The tails (1) are cut into one of the adjoining members, and the mating pins (2) are cut into the other. Traditionally, dovetail joints have split pins or half pins (3) at the top and bottom edge — tails are not usually split. Each of the tails, pins, and half pins are tiny tenons with angled cheeks (4) and square shoulders (5).

6-8 To make a through-dovetail joint — or any dovetail joint — first mark the spacing of the dovetails. Decide how many tails you want to cut across the width of the tail board. For example, if you want to cut five dovetails (five tails and six pins) across the board, hold the Layout Rule (see page 90) at an angle, using five spaces — no more, no less — to span the width. (For small dovetails, use the edge on which the lines are 1 inch apart;

for larger dovetails, use the side on which the lines are IV2 inches apart.) Place the holder against one edge of the board and slip it onto the rule, gripping the rule at the proper angle. Keeping the holder against the board's edge, slide the rule toward the end of the board. Where each line on the rule crosses the end, make a mark on the board. When you're finished, there should be four marks on the end of the board, dividing its width into five equal sections.

6-9 Next, decide how wide to make the pins. The narrowest part of the pin — the side that will be flush with the outside of the assembled joint — must be at least as wide as your smallest paring chisel. Using the special marks on the Layout Rule that indicate pin width, mark the narrow sides of the pins at each of the spacing marks, as shown. Remember to mark half pins at the top and bottom edges of the board. Using a small square, transfer these marks to both sides of the board.

6-10 Using a marking gauge, scribe the base of the tails on both sides and both edges of the board. Be sure to set the marking gauge for V32 inch more than the wood thickness, as mentioned previously.

6-11 Mark the angled cheeks of the tails with the Slope Gauge (see page 90), scribing angled lines from the baseline to the marks that indicate the width of the pins. Mark all the right-sloping cheeks, then turn the gauge over and mark the left-sloping cheeks. Remember to mark both sides of the board. Shade the stock between the tails to indicate the waste.

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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