Info

When drilling a row of overlapping square holes, you must make the cuts in the proper sequence. Drill the ends of the mortise first, then go back and remove the waste between them. Ideally, the overlapping portion of the holes should be no more than one-quarter the width of the chisel — otherwise, the chisel may drift in the cut.

making and fitting tenons

There are also many ways to make a tenon. Again, here are three of the easiest.

Many woodworkers prefer to make tenons on a table saw with an ordinary blade. First, cut the shoulders of the tenon, using a miter gauge to guide

the workpiece. Then cut the cheeks, using a tenoning jig. (For instructions and plans on how to make this fixture, see the "Tenoning Jig" on page 72.) Test fit the tenon to its mortise and adjust the setup as needed. (See Figures 5-13 and 5-14.)

5-13 To cut a tenon with an ordinary table saw blade, first cut

the shoulders. Guide the stock with a miter gauge. If you wish, use the fence to position the stock on the gauge. ,

You can also make a tenon with a dado cutter. The advantage to using this accessory is that you can cut both a shoulder and a cheek in one pass. You also have a choice of using either the tenoning jig or the

Tenoning Dado

5-15 To cut a tenon with a dado cutter, mount the workpiece in a tenoning jig. Back up the workpiece with a scrap board to prevent the cutter from tearing the wood grain when it exits the workpiece. Then guide the jig along the fence, past the cutter.

5-14 Next, cut the cheeks, using a tenoning jig to hold the stock as you slide the jig along the fence. Test fit the tenon in its mortise. If its too tight, move the fence closer to the blade — this will shave a little more stock from the tenon. If it's too loose, move the fence farther away — this will make the tenon thicker.

miter gauge to guide the stock. (See Figures 5-15 and 5-16.) The disadvantage is that it usually requires more setup time — you have to remove the blade from your table saw and mount the dado cutter.

5-16 You can also use a miter gauge to guide the workpiece when cutting a tenon with a dado cutter. This setup allows you to make much longer tenons, since you aren't limited by the diameter of the cutter. It's also easier to cut shoulders and cheeks on all four sides of a tenon. The disadvantage is that you usually must make several passes to cut each tenon side.

TryThizTrick

5-17 You can cut a tenon on a table-mounted router using a miter gauge to guide the tenon over the bit. Prevent the workpiece from creeping across the face of the gauge by positioning the fence just behind the bit. Make sure this fence is precisely parallel to the miter gauge slot, or the cut won't be accurate.

Undercut Shoulder

Finally, you can cut a tenon on a table-mounted router, using a miter gauge to guide the workpiece over a straight bit. (See Figure 5-17.) Like a routed mortise, a routed tenon requires multiple passes over the bit — if you have lots of tenons to make, this isn't the tool to use. However, the routed cheeks and shoulders are extremely smooth. If the fit of the tenon or the strength of the glue bond is paramount, use a router.

TryThizTrick

To fit a mortise-and-tenon joint with no gap between the adjoining parts, it may help to undercut the shoulders of the tenon. Using a chisel, remove a small amount of stock from the shoulder where it meets the cheek.

5-17 You can cut a tenon on a table-mounted router using a miter gauge to guide the tenon over the bit. Prevent the workpiece from creeping across the face of the gauge by positioning the fence just behind the bit. Make sure this fence is precisely parallel to the miter gauge slot, or the cut won't be accurate.

Undercut Shoulder

Tenoning Jig a tenoning jig holds a workpiece vertically to make a cut in its end. This particular jig rides along the table saw fence, like the "Splined Miter Jig' on page 56. The workpiece rests against a quadrant, and a clamp secures the workpiece to the vertical face of the jig. You can adjust the angle of the workpiece between 45 and 90 degrees by rotating the quadrant.

Make the vertical face and the spacer from 3A-inch cabinet-grade plywood, and the remaining parts from hardwood. Cut or rout the slots in the spacer and the quadrant. Also make the dado in the vertical face. Drill the holes needed to mount the quadrant and the clamp.

Glue and screw the spacer to the face Secure the quadrant to the face with carriage bolts, washers, and wing nuts. (Note that there arc six mounting holes, and the quadrant can be attached in four different positions.) Attach the leg to the spacer with roundhead wood screws and washers. Adjust the gap between the leg and the face to fit your table saw fence, then tighten the wing nuts.

If the rounded portion of a peg protrudes from the back of the assembly, cut it flush with the surface of the wood. Lightly sand both the round end and the square end.

Pegging a Mortise-and-Tenon Joint

Craftsmen sometimes secure a tenon in a mortise by driving one or more pegs through the joint. The traditional method for pegging a mortise-and-tenon joint is to drive a square peg in a round hole.

This method works much better than using round pegs or dowels. The comers of the square pegs wedge themselves in the holes and cant work loose.

If the rounded portion of a peg protrudes from the back of the assembly, cut it flush with the surface of the wood. Lightly sand both the round end and the square end.

After assembling the joint, drill one or more holes, as big around as the peg is square, through both the mortise and tenon. Note: Don't locate the holes too close to the end of the tenon. The tenon might split when you install the pegs.

Coat each peg with glue and drive it into the hole, round end first. Tap it in until the square top is almost flush with the surface of the wood. Be careful not to hit the peg so hard that it splinters.

JL Make the pegs from a xery hard wood, such as oak, maple, or hickory. Whittle about three-quarters of each peg's length, making it more and more round toward one end. When you're finished, one end should be round and the other end square. The square portion should be about V2 inch long.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment