Chisel Cut Wood

6-12 Using a dovetail saw or a dozuki saw, cut the sloping cheeks down to the baseline. If you wish, use the Slope Gauge as shown to help start the cut. You can also use the Chisel Guide (see page 90) to hold the board as you cut it.

6-13 As you cut the cheeks, you must monitor both sides of the board, making sure the saw follows both sets of layout lines. You can do this with a great deal of head bobbing, or you can use the Third Eye (see page 31) to keep watch on the side of the board facing away from you.

6-14 Once you've cut the cheeks of the tails, cut along the baseline to remove the waste. Do this with a chisel, using it alternately as a cutting tool and a wedge. Clamp the board in the Chisel Guide, aligning the guide block with the base layout line. Place the chisel so the edge is on the layout line and the back is flat against the guide block — this will hold the chisel vertically at precisely 90 degrees to the surface of the stock. Strike the chisel lightly with a mallet, cutting through the grain and about Vi6 inch into the wood.

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6-16 After cutting the tails, scribe the base of the pins with a marking gauge. (Once again, the pins should be V32 inch longer than the thickness of the adjoining board.) Then use the tails as a template to mark the cheeks of the pins. Clamp the pin board vertically in the Chisel Guide and the tail board horizontally. The tails should cover the end of the

6-15 Next, split out a bit of the waste. Hold the chisel horizontally with its edge against the end and about Vi6 inch below the surface. Again, strike the chisel lightly with a mallet. This time, it will split out a small amount of waste. Continue cut ting and splitting with the chisel until you have removed the waste halfway through the board. Turn the board over and repeat, removing the remaining waste.

pin board and the surfaces should be flush, as shown. Place the back of a chisel against one of the sloping cheeks of the tails. Tap the chisel with a mallet, cutting about V32 inch into the end of the pin board. Repeat for all the cheeks of all the tails. Remove the board from the Chisel Guide and shade the waste between the pins.

6-17 Cut the cheeks of the pins with a dovetail saw or a dozuki saw. As you did when making the tails, you can use the Slope Gauge to start the cut, and the Third Eye to monitor the underside of the board as the cut progresses.

6-18 After cutting the cheeks of the pins, clamp the pin board in the Chisel Guide, aligning the guide block with the base layout line. Remove the waste between the pins as you did with the tails, using the chisel alternately as a cutting tool and a wedge. When the waste is gone, fit the joint together. The pins should slide easily between the tails, and the edges of the board should be flush. Sand the protruding ends flush after the joint is assembled.

Images Wood Cutiing And Joining

6-17 Cut the cheeks of the pins with a dovetail saw or a dozuki saw As you did when making the tails, you can use the Slope Gauge to start the cut, and the Third Eye to monitor the underside of the board as the cut progresses.

6-15 Next, split out a bit of the waste. Hold the chisel horizontally with its edge against the end and about Vi6 inch below the surface. Again, strike the chisel lightly with a mallet. This time, it will split out a small amount of waste. Continue cutting and splitting with the chisel until you have removed the waste halfway through the board. Turn the board over and repeat, removing the remaining waste.

6-16 After cutting the tails, scribe the base of the pins with a marking gauge. (Once again, the pins should be V32 inch longer than the thickness of the adjoining board.) Then use the tails as a template to mark the cheeks of the pins. Clamp the pin board vertically in the Chisel Guide and the tail board horizontally. The tails should cover the end of the pin board and the surfaces should be flush, as shown. Place the back of a chisel against one of the sloping cheeks of the tails. Tap the chisel with a mallet, cutting about 732 inch into the end of the pin board. Repeat for all the cheeks of all the tails. Remove the board from the Chisel Guide and shade the waste between the pins.

6-18 After cutting the cheeks of the pins, clamp the pin board in the Chisel Guide, aligning the guide block with the base layout line. Remove the waste between the pins as you did with the tails, using the chisel alternately as a cutting tool and a wedge. When the waste is gone, fit the joint together. The pins should slide easily between the tails, and the edges of the board should be flush. Sand the protruding ends flush after the joint is assembled.

Dovetail Aids

Here are three easy-to-make jigs that will greatly simplify the task of making hand-cut dovetail joints — a Layout Rule, a Chisel Guide, and a Slope Gauge.

Layout Rule — The rule and holder are used in the same manner as a sliding T-bevel. The rule is marked so you can space the tails evenly and measure the width of the pins. Cut all the parts from hardwood and mark the rule with an awl, indelible ink, or a woodburning tool. Glue the parts of the holder together. Insert the bolt and tighten the nut until the holder will grasp the rule firmly, but not so firmly that the rule becomes immobile.

Chisel Guide — The guide holds the boards while you remove the waste from between the pins and tails. It also directs the chisel and will keep both boards in proper alignment while you use the tail board to lay out the pin board. Make the guide blocks from hardwood and the horizontal and vertical bases from cabinet-grade plywood. Glue and screw the bases together.

Slope Gauge — This gauge not only marks the slope of the tails and pins, but it will also guide a saw when you start a cut. Before making the gauge, decide on the slope — it should be between 8 and 12 degrees for the joint to be as strong as possible. Cut the parts from hardwood and glue them together. The edges of the ledgers must be precisely parallel.

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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