Toe Kick

Tedswoodworking Plans

Ted's Woodworking Plans

Get Instant Access

As you can see in the main drawing above, the bookcase has two sides that are held together by three fixed shelves. The first step to putting it together is to make a hardboard template for the sides.

THE TEMPLATE. Making the template accomplishes three things. First, it makes locating the shelf holes in the sides easier and more precise. Second, the outline of the curved front can simply be traced onto the sides. Finally, the template can be used as a guide to trim the sides to their final shape. The box below shows how the template is made and put to use.

THE SIDES. Once the template is done, you can lay it on one of the inside faces of the bookcase sides. I used double-stick tape to keep the template from sliding while tracing the curve and drilling the holes for the shelf hardware {see details 'a' and 'b' below). Then simply repeat the process for the other side piece.

CUTTING THE GROOVE. After removing the template, you can turn your

How-To; Make & Use The Template

Lay Out Curve. Use a narrow strip of hardboard and nails to lay out the bookcase's curve on the template.

Drill Shelf Holes. Connector hardware and shelf pins require two different sized holes drilled at different depths.

Lay Out Curve. Use a narrow strip of hardboard and nails to lay out the bookcase's curve on the template.

Drill Shelf Holes. Connector hardware and shelf pins require two different sized holes drilled at different depths.

attention to the groove that runs aiong the back edge of each side. These grooves will hold the back panel. Because the V4" plywood used for the back panel is closer to 3/i6" thick, 1 cut the groove by making two passes on my table saw to get a snug fit.

CUTTING THE CURVE. At this point, all that's left to complete the sides is to cut the curved shape. You can see how to finish up the curve in the two drawings below.

THE SHELVES. Now, it's time to focus on the shelves. As 1 said before, the top, bottom, and middle shelves are fixed. In fact, they're holding the bookcase together with quick-connect hardware. The other two shelves are adjustable and will rest on shelf pins. (Sources are listed on page 49.)

After cutting the shelves to size (remember that the fixed shelves are three different widths), you can set the adjustable shelves aside for now while you continue working on the three fixed shelves.

CUTTING THE GROOVES. I started by taking the upper and lower fixed shelves over to my table saw. These shelves need grooves to hold the V plywood for the back panel, as shown in details V and 'c' at the top of the opposite page.

Once the grooves are cut, take these two shelves and the middle shelf over to the drill press. The first job is to drill the holes for the connector hardware. Each connector is made up of two parts: a cam and a pin. The pin is installed into the side of the bookcase, while the cam fits into a hole in the shelf.

The real trick is getting the holes in the shelves aligned with the holes in the sides of the bookcase. To help me with this, I used a jig like the one shown in the box at right. Shop Notebook on page 30 shows how to make the jig.

TOE KICK AND TOP PANEL To provide extra support and give the bookcase a more finished look, you can add a toe kick to the bottom shelf and a back panel to the top. Both are rabbeted to fit into grooves (see details 'a' and V on the opposite page). The panel is "trapped" in the grooves in the sides, while the toe kick is glued in the groove on the bottom side of the bottom shelf.

TOP PANEL NOTCHES. You'll notice in detail 'a' (top of opposite page) that the top panel has notches in its upper corners. The notches fit around blocks that will be added to the grooves during assembly to protect the edge banding.

With all this done, the next step will be to add the edging and put the bookcase together.

How-To: Shelf Holes

Drilling the Cam Holes. Drill the holes for the cams from the bottom side of the shelves. Take care so you don't drill through the shelves (detail 'a').

Rotate and Flip. Rotate the shelf and flip the jig to drill the cam holes in the back of the shelves. A support block keeps the shelf level.

Rough Cut Profile on Sides. Stay to the waste side of the layout line when rough-cutting the curve.

Trim It Up. Use a router, a flush trim bit, and the template to smooth out the curves in the bookcase sides.

Drilling the Connector Holes. Line the jig up with the cam holes to drill the holes for the connectors into the edges of the shelves.

Rough Cut Profile on Sides. Stay to the waste side of the layout line when rough-cutting the curve.

Trim It Up. Use a router, a flush trim bit, and the template to smooth out the curves in the bookcase sides.

Middle Fixed Cam Holes. Add a spacer to drill the holes in the middle shelf to account for the back panel that it butts up against-

Jointer Cuts Curve

Back edge of shelf is set against n jigstop-C^

15mm Forstner bit

Bottom face of shelf

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment