Guide Block Positioning

Since I need to build some lumber storage racks in my shop, I'm lookingforivard to the results of the wood storage contest announced in Woodsmith No. 7It. I'm especially interested in ways to store small amounts of lumber and scraps. Lots of books tell how to store hundreds of board feet, but no one says what to do with the short stuff. Any ideas Greg Scherer Long Lake, Minnesota The results of the wood storage contest on pages 28 and 29 of this issue will give you some specific ideas on how...

Table Top For Roller Stand Seethru Clamping Block

I made the wide Roller Stand in Woodsmith No. 70. But since I don't use it every day, I made a cover for the rollers that converts the stand into a table, see Fig. 1. (Editor's note The same idea could be used to cover a table saw or router table.) To make the cover, cut a piece of plywood large enough to fit over the rollers and the roller rails (mine is 24 x 32). Then cut two Vi-square strips of wood as spacers to fit under the plywood. (This way, the plywood top rests on the Roller Stand's...

The Base

SAND SURFACE OF TOP SMOOTH TO THE TOUCH The curved top of the clock has two parts a kerf-bent piece of Masonite that serves as a base for a strip of veneer. top. To make the bent top (D). begin by ripping a strip of W Masonite to width to fit between the rabbets on the case front and back. The strip should be about 24 long. kerf cuts. To get the Masonite to curve around the shape of the front and back. I cut a series of kerfs on this piece, see Fig. 4a. (For more on kerf bending, see page 12.)...

Aprons And Back

At this point the legs are screwed to the case. The next step is to add the apron to the curved front. The apron is made from a single strip of W-thick cherry ply- three sections to fit between the legs. apron. Begin work on the apron (H) by cutting a 4-wide, 48-long strip of cherry plywood. (Note The face grain of the plywood should run the length of the strip.) Before cutting the apron into sections, I added an apron inlay (I) strip for appearance. To do this, rout a W-wide rabbet along the...

Sawdust

Building furniture in a production professional shop usually involves very different methods and techniques than used in a home shop. The biggest factor is repetition. Production shops employ a lot of jigs, set-ups, and templates because they're doing the same task over and over to produce multiple pieces of furniture. But some of those methods can be very useful in building a single piece of furniture in a home shop. For example, both of the projects in this issue require cutting curved...

Tapered Legs

Before starting on this table, you have to decide if you want to add inlays and decorative beading to the legs, or not. The cover of this issue shows a table being built without these parts. If you don't want to add them, you can start on the legs by cutting four leg cores A , 1W square and 29 long. I used cherry for the legs. Then skip to the section below taper leg cores. and then continue with building the case on page 22. inlays. If you want the inlaid look for the legs, go ahead and cut...

Beading

45angle Puzzle

There's one more set of trim to add the decorative beading that softens the transition between the flat section at the top of the legs and the tapered lower section. rout dadoes. The beading fits in shallow dadoes cut near the top of each leg, refer to Fig. 11.1 routed these dadoes on the router table, see Fig. 7. You could use a table saw, but the chance of chipout is reduced if you use a router and you'll get a cleaner cut . To locate the dadoes, start by positioning the fence on your router...

Curved Front Table

A curved apron and tapered legs with inlays are two of the challenges in building this classic table. Rut how do you inlay the legs They're not really inlays, but a simple technique to give it the look of inlay. There's something about this Curved-Front Table that brings out the curiosity in any craftsman. How are the curved aprons made Is a thick piece used and then cut into a curved shape Or is it bent somehow And how about the legs. I'm sure some kind of fancy jig was used to get the inlays...

The Template

A W'-thick template is used to shape the front and back of the clock, see Template Diagram below. Since the case front and back are the same size, you can use this template to cut both pieces. The only difference is the opening in the case back. To make the template, begin with a piece of thin plywood or Masonite 7 8 wide and 17V4 long. Use a compass to draw the arcs as shown. To complete the template, cut on the waste side of the line for the arched top and for the door opening. Then sand or...

Right Hand Router Rules

Trying to figure out which direction to move my router along the edge of a workpiece is often confusing. So I came up with this simple way to help remember which direction to rout All I use are the thumb and index finger on my right hand. For instance, when routing the edge of a workpiece with a hand-held router, it's best to feed the router from left to right. This way. the bit cuts cleanly into the wood and doesn't bounce along the edge. To help remember this, I hold my right hand with the...

Shopmade Pattern

If you don't have a flush trim or pattern bit, it's still possible to rout shapes using the technique explained above. You can convert a straight bit to work like a pattern bit just add a ball bearing guide and retaining collar, see drawing at right and Sources, page 31. To convert a straight bit into a pattern bit use a ball bearing with an inside diameter that matches the shaft of the straight bit, and an outside diameter the same as the cutting diameter of the straight bit. Then, to keep the...

Kerf Bending Wood Techniques

Bending Wood

Six tips from fellow woodworkers 1 Jig for Cutting Thin Strips. 2 Right Hand Router Rules. 3 Pipe Clamp Extender, h Table Top for Roller Stand. 5 See-Thru Clamping Block. 6 Starting Screws in Tight Places. The curved top of this traditional Tambour Clock was made by gluing veneer over kerf-bent Masonite. A timely technique for a timeless design. The key to successfid kerf bending is the spacing between the keifs and cutting the kerfs to the right depth. Use this techn ique to create classic...

Routing Rabbets

Router Table Fence

To get a standard 3 '-deep rabbeting bit to cut a W-deep rabbet, 1 made a simple jig for the router table. The jig is just a strip of Ma-sonite cut W wide. Then a VV'-dia. hole is drilled near one end. see Fig. A below. Drill the hole centered on the width of the strip, leaving Vis on each side of the hole. Now round off the end of the strip so there's also a W-wide band on the end of the strip. To use the jig, mount a W rabbeting bit in the router table and adjust it to the desired height....

Tambour Clock

Kerf Cut Bending

The double curve gives this clock a classic, graceful shape. Building it involves a couple of techniques you may not have used before - kerf bending and routing shapes with a template. At first glance this Tambour Clock appears to be made from a solid block of walnut. But up close you notice that only the base is solid wood. When you open the door on the back and look inside, you see that the front and back of the case are plywood. And the top looks like plywood, but on the inside it's...

Resawing Veneer From Plywood

Resawing Veneer Jig

I wanted the wood on the top and ends of the Tambour Clock on page 6 to match the veneer of the plywood I used for the front and back of the clock. So I re-sawed the veneer off a piece of the same sheet of plywood that I used for the front and back. plywood blank. To do this, start with a piece of plywood slightly wider and a little longer than the finished size you'll need for your project. For the Clock top and end strips I used one piece 4W wide and 25Vi gt long. saw set-up. Though the...

Access Door

How Make Bench Vise

In order to have access to the clock works, I added a door to the back of the case. The opening in the back of the case has already been cut to shape. So now the door has to be cut to fit cur to size. To make the door I , first measure the size of the door opening. Then cut a blank W longer than the opening is wide, and W under than the opening is tall, see Fig. 10. This will orient the grain of the door horizontally the same direction as the case back. This size also allows for a lip on the...

Cutting Jig For Thin Strips

In Woodsmith No. 74, you show a method of cutting thin strips on the table saw where the strip is cut between the blade and the fence. But I prefer to rip thin strips using a simple jig that's between the blade and fence, see Fig. 1. The jig supports the strip as it's being cut And it has an adjustable stop that pushes the strip past the blade. To make this jig, first cut a piece of V4 plywood 6 wide and 24 long. Next so the jig can be used to cut strips of different thicknesses, I added an...

Drawing A Partial Ellipse

Ellips Wooden Jig

The top of the Curved-Front Table on page 18 is semi-elliptical it's shaped like an oval split in half. To make one, you'll need to draw a partial ellipse. All it takes is a pencil, a piece of thin wire and a couple nails. i ay oit. Start by drawing a straight line as long as the length of the template for the table top 33 , see Fig. 1. Then mark one end of the line A, and the other end C. Now find the centerpoint and mark it B. Next, draw a perpendicular line from the centerpoint B . Make it...

Spring Pole

Here's another good way to keep plywood stacked neatly against a wall use a spring pole, see Fig. 1. Andre Camire of New Bedford, Massachusetts uses this method to hold sheets of plywood in his wall storage rack. Andre's spring poles are made from two pieces of conduit, one with an outside diameter just small enough so it fits inside the other. The larger piece is plugged about a quarter of the wav down from the too and a REMOVE EYE BOLT AND SWING ARMS UP TO OPEN RACK REMOVE EYE BOLT AND SWING...

Kerf Spacing

Kerf Bending Formula Trim Molding

The spacing between kerfs or the width of the ribs not only will affect the maximum radius that you can bend, but also how smooth the bent piece will look. The reason kerf spacing is linked to the smoothness of the bend has to do with a problem that's unique to kerf-bending called flats, see photo above. QUESTION What is a flat, and how can I minimize this problem Flats are caused by the difference in flexibility between the thick ribs and the thin webs. As the wood is bent around a form, the...

Kerfing Different Materials

Cutting The Kerfs

In addition to kerf spacing and depth, the material you choose also affects how tight a radius you can bend and still get a smooth surface. Most materials used in the shop can be kerf bent. And with some materials such as plywood and particleboard , it may be the only way to bend them successfully. As you might expect, the solid woods that bend the best using steam or thin laminations are also the best choice for kerf bending. Woods such as oak. walnut, mahogany, and ash are flexible and bend...

Kerf Bending

Steam Bending Plywood

QUESTION How are kerfs used for bending wood QUESTION If kerf bending is so easy, why would anyone steam bend thick strips or laminate thin strips Of all the ways to bend wood into a gentle curve, I think kerf bending is the easiest. It doesn't use special equipment as steam bending does, or a lot of forms and clamps as with bent laminations. It's just a matter of cutting a series of grooves kerfs to relieve the back of the curve. -This technique has been used in general construction to bend...