Basic Essentials

As with most craft skills, there is hardly ever only

one way to cut a joint. With experience, every woodworker adapts the basic methods, incorporating small personal variations that make the job easier or produce a better result for them. Nevertheless, there is a hard core of accepted procedures and techniques that are consistent with snug-fitting joints.

Accurate marking-out

The old adage, measure twice and cut once', is good advice. Hurried, inaccurate work when marking out joints leads to all manner of problems. Buy well-made rules and tape measures, and always stick to either the imperial or metric systems of measurement - the conversions quoted in this book are approximate only. Mark out overall dimensions with a sharp pencil, but use a marking knife to score lines that are to be cut, so as to avoid leaving a rough edge of torn wood fibres. Always run the flat face of the knife against the try square or straightedge. Use a sharp pencil to emphasize a knifed line that is difficult to see; on dark-coloured woods, rub the surface with white chalk to accentuate the line.

How Cut Knife Joint Wood Beams
When cutting shoulder lines all round a piece of wood, locate the point of the knife in the cut you have just made, then slide the try square up against the blade.
Basic Knife Cuts

Marking one component from another

Whenever possible, mark one component from another, rather than relying on measurements.

Marking one component from another

Whenever possible, mark one component from another, rather than relying on measurements.

Shoulder Line Woodworking

Marking identical components

If an assembly includes several identical components, lay them together on the bench and mark them out at

Marking identical components

If an assembly includes several identical components, lay them together on the bench and mark them out at

Marking Timber Face Edge Signs
When preparing timber for jointing, plane two adjoining surfaces perfectly square, taking all subsequent measurements and angles from them. Conventional symbols are used to denote these surfaces as face side and face edge.

Cutting on the waste side

Allow for the width of a saw cut (the kerf) by always cutting on the waste side of any marked line.

the shoulders meet snugly, and that they won't have to force a tight joint and risk splitting the wood. Identify each joint with pencil marks so that there is no confusion when it comes to gluing the assembly.

Wood Working 101

Wood Working 101

Have you ever wanted to begin woodworking at home? Woodworking can be a fun, yet dangerous experience if not performed properly. In The Art of Woodworking Beginners Guide, we will show you how to choose everything from saws to hand tools and how to use them properly to avoid ending up in the ER.

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Responses

  • robert
    How to mark joints in wood work?
    2 years ago

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