Corner Bridle Joint

HAND CUT

A corner bridle joint is adequate for relatively lightweight frames, provided they are not subjected to sideways pressure, which tends to force bridle joints out of square. The strength of the bridle is improved considerably if you insert two dowels through the side of the joint after the glue has set.

Bridle JointCentre Bridle Joint

1 Marking out the shoulders

Taking each tenon member in turn, mark square shoulders all round, allowing for a tenon that is slightly overlong so that it can be planed flush after the joint is complete. Use a marking knife, but apply light pressure across both edges. Mark out the mortise member similarly, but this time use a pencil.

Machine Jointoyer

2 Scribing the tenon

Set the points of a mortise gauge to one-third the thickness of the wood, and adjust the tool's stock (fence) to centre the points on the edge of the work. Scribe the width of the tenon on both edges and across the end.

2 Scribing the tenon

Set the points of a mortise gauge to one-third the thickness of the wood, and adjust the tool's stock (fence) to centre the points on the edge of the work. Scribe the width of the tenon on both edges and across the end.

Bridle Joint

4 Cutting the open mortise

Select a drill bit that approximates the width of the mortise, and bore a hole into the waste wood just above the shoulder line on opposite sides of the joint. Set the wood in a vice and saw on the waste side of both gauged lines, down to the hole at the base of the mortise. Chisel the shoulder square.

Machine Vice Tenons

5 Cutting the tenon

With the work clamped in a vice, saw both sides of the tenon down to the shoulder (see mortise and tenon, page 65). Lay the workpiece on its side on a bench hook and saw each shoulder line to remove the waste wood.

3 Marking out the open mortise

Use the same gauge to mark the sides of the open mortise, then take a marking knife and score the short shoulders at the base of the mortise, between the gauged lines. Mark the waste wood with a pencil on both components so that you don't get confused when cutting the joint.

5 Cutting the tenon

With the work clamped in a vice, saw both sides of the tenon down to the shoulder (see mortise and tenon, page 65). Lay the workpiece on its side on a bench hook and saw each shoulder line to remove the waste wood.

Wood Joints Machines
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Responses

  • aristide
    How to cut a corner bridle joint with a table saw?
    6 years ago
  • ulrich
    Where is bridle joint applicable?
    6 months ago

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