Hammers And Mallets

Antique Carpenters Hammer

Most workshops boast a range of hammers, even though they are rarely used in joint-making, except when reinforcing with pins or nails.

Cross-peen hammer

Cross-peen hammer (square pattern)

Pin hammer

Pin hammer (square pattern)

Claw hammer

Cross-peen hammer

One medium-weight cross-peen hammer will suffice for most needs. It is heavy enough to tap joints together and dismantle them again, yet sufficiently well-balanced so that you can perform precise operations, such as starting a nail or panel pin with the wedge-shape peen on the back of the hammer head.

Carpenter's mallet

Although you can drive plastic-handle chisels and gouges with a metal hammer, you will need to use a mallet for those with wooden handles, to prevent them splitting. This tool is specially designed for the job; its wide head is tapered so that it will strike a chisel squarely each time, and will wedge itself even Jte^ ^ more securely on/ : / the tapered i^HSiil^

Pin hammer

For delicate work, such as nailing small picture-frame mitres, use a lightweight cross-peen pin hammer.

Claw hammer

You will find a claw hammer convenient for making jigs and mock-ups from softwood. Not only can you drive in large nails with ease, but you can also extract them with the split peen. using the strong shaft as a lever. Though slightly more expensive, all-metal claw hammers are even stronger than those with wooden shafts.

A nail set is a tapered metal punch that is used with a hammer to drive nail heads below a wood surface.

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