How To Cut A Halving Joint

The tapered stopped housing is a variant of the stopped housing, having a dovetail slope along one side, hut also tapering towards the stopped end. It is particularly useful for deep cabinets, because it remains slack while you assemble the joint, finally pulling itself tight at the last moment. However, it requires very precise making to achieve the desired result.

1 Marking the housing

Pencil a straight-sided, stopped housing on the side panel, then rule a line representing the tapered shoulder of the housing. Allow for the dovetail by starting the line 3mm (Vein) above the lower shoulder at the back end of the housing, and then tapering to 6mm (1/iin) above the line at the stopped end.

2 Chiselling grooves along the shoulders

Deeply score both the square and tapering shoulders with a marking knife, then chisel out the waste up to the scored lines, forming shallow V-shape grooves.

Square Stopped Housing

shelf

3 Sawing the shoulders

Chop out the waste from the stopped housing end to provide saw-blade clearance, then cut both shoulders with a saw. Undercut the tapering shoulder to an angle of 80 degrees, using a shaped block to guide the blade. Pare out the waste and level the housing with a router plane.

shelf

Housing Joint Shelf

4 Dovetailing the shelf end

Mark the shoulder line on the underside of the shelf, using a cutting gauge, and mark the taper on the end grain, taking the dimensions from the housing. Cut out the notch at the stopped end, and saw along the shoulder line. Pare out the waste with a chisel, following the dovetail angle. Try assembling the joint, and relieve any tight spots until it fits snugly.

Useful Out Waste

2 Marking the tongue

Using the gauge with the same setting, mark the tongue on the end and down both edges of the horizontal member, working from the face side.

The barefaced housing joint is a variation on the basic lap joint, adapted for making box-frame or cabinet corners. The housing should be no deeper than about one-quarter the thickness of the wood, and about the same in width.

Box Joint Cutting Machine

3 Marking the rabbet shoulder

Reset the gauge to about one-third the thickness of the side panel, and mark the rabbet shoulder line across the face side and down both edges of the horizontal member. Form the rabbet by removing the waste with a saw and cleaning up with a shoulder plane.

4 Cutting the housing

Mark the depth of the housing on the edges of the side panel and remove the waste with a saw and chisel, as described for a through housing joint (see page 48).

The barefaced housing joint is a variation on the basic lap joint, adapted for making box-frame or cabinet corners. The housing should be no deeper than about one-quarter the thickness of the wood, and about the same in width.

1 Marking the housing

Cut and plane square the ends of both components. Set a cutting gauge to the thickness of the horizontal member, and lightly scribe the bottom edge of the housing across the side panel and down both edges. Reset the gauge and scribe the top edge of the

2 Marking the tongue

Using the gauge with the same setting, mark the tongue on the end and down both edges of the horizontal member, working from the face side.

HOUSING JOINTS

Housing Joints

horizontal member

HOUSING JOINTS

horizontal member

Housing Joints Biscuit Joiner

horizontal member

3 Setting up for cutting the tongue

Mark the width of the tongue on the horizontal member, using the housing as a template. Reset the rip fence to cut just to the waste side of the mark.

BAREFACED HOUSING JOINT

MACHINE CUT

3 Setting up for cutting the tongue

Mark the width of the tongue on the horizontal member, using the housing as a template. Reset the rip fence to cut just to the waste side of the mark.

The simplicity of the barefaced housing joint lends itself to cutting by machine. You could use a router for cutting the housing, or use a table saw, as shown here, for cutting the entire joint. You may need a dado head (see page 122) to make a wide cut, or you can fit wobble washers which cant the saw blade to a slight angle, making a wider-than-normal kerf as the blade rotates.

1 Setting up for cutting the housing

Using the horizontal member as a guide, set the rip fence to place the saw blade flush with the outside face of the wood. If you are using wobble washers, check that the blade is canted to its full extent.

horizontal member

1 Setting up for cutting the housing

Using the horizontal member as a guide, set the rip fence to place the saw blade flush with the outside face of the wood. If you are using wobble washers, check that the blade is canted to its full extent.

Rabbet Joint

5 Cutting the rabbet shoulder

Clamp a wooden spacer to the rip fence; the end of the tongue will run against this. Raise the saw blade and adjust the fence to cut the rabbet, leaving a tongue that will fit the housing precisely.

2 Cutting the housing

Raise the blade to one-quarter of the side-panel thickness. Lay the side panel flat on the saw table, its end butted against the rip fence, and pass the work over the blade. Adjust the rip fence sideways to make a second cut for a wider housing. Use the saw's mitre fence to steady a narrow workpiece

5 Cutting the rabbet shoulder

Clamp a wooden spacer to the rip fence; the end of the tongue will run against this. Raise the saw blade and adjust the fence to cut the rabbet, leaving a tongue that will fit the housing precisely.

4 Cutting the tongue

Holding the work on end, run the horizontal panel against the fence to cut a kerf alongside the tongue. Use a jig (see page 37) to support a narrow workpiece.

Chapter 8 Halving j oints are employed exclusively for framing, using wood of equal thickness for both components of a joint. They are very easy to cut, even with handtools, and the basic joint can be adapted to make right-angle corners, T-joints and cross frames.

How Cut Pipe Angle Joint Kerf JointHow Cut Pipe Angle Joint

divider

4 Chopping out the waste

Clamp the work in a vice and chisel out the waste, working from each side towards the middle of each component. Pare the bottom of each resulting recess

1 Marking the shoulders

Lay both components side-by-side and score the shoulder lines across them, using a try square and marking knife. Continue both sets of marked lines halfway down each edge.

Making Cross Halving Joints

With a cross halving joint, both halves of the joint are identical. Although the joint is equally strong whichever way the components run, convention dictates that the vertical member or divider appears to run through, although, in reality, half the thickness is removed from each piece of wood.

divider

4 Chopping out the waste

Clamp the work in a vice and chisel out the waste, working from each side towards the middle of each component. Pare the bottom of each resulting recess

1 Marking the shoulders

Lay both components side-by-side and score the shoulder lines across them, using a try square and marking knife. Continue both sets of marked lines halfway down each edge.

2 Marking the depth of the joint

Set a marking gauge to exactly half the thickness of the wood, and scribe a line between the shoulders marked on the edges of both components.

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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Responses

  • vanessa
    How to cut a stopped housing joint by hand?
    7 years ago
  • louie christie
    How do you cut a housing joint by machine?
    7 years ago
  • abraham
    How to cut a cross halving joint?
    6 years ago
  • hugo clayhanger
    How to mark out corner halving joints?
    6 years ago
  • Robinia
    What machine would you use to cut a cross halving joint?
    5 years ago
  • abelardo
    How to cut cross halving joint notch?
    5 years ago
  • hagos
    How to machining cross joint?
    4 years ago
  • Darcy
    What tools are used to cut wooden cross halving joints?
    2 years ago
  • claudia
    How to cut stopped dovetail halving?
    2 years ago
  • teuvo
    How to cut a halving joint wood?
    2 years ago

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