Hand

The classic joint for picture frames, the mitred butt joint makes a neat right-angle corner without visible end grain. Cutting wood at 45 degrees produces a relatively large surface area of tangentially cut grain that glues well. For lightweight frames, just add glue and set the joint in a mitre cramp.

Box-frame mitre joint

Flat-frame mitre joint

Open joint caused by Inside gap as a result inaccurate cutting of wood shrinking

Accurate mitre cutting

Before you pick up a saw, always ensure that the mitre is exactly half the joint angle, or the joint will be gappy. In addition, use well-seasoned timber or a gap may open up on the inside of the joint as the wood shrinks.

Trimming a wide board

Since it is impossible to mitre a wide piece of wood on a shooting board, clamp the work upright in a bench vice and trim the end grain with a finely set block plane. To prevent splitting, back up the work with a piece of scrap timber.

On each piece of wood, mark the sloping shoulder of the joint, using a knife and mitre square. Extend the marked line across the adjacent faces with a try square. To remove the waste, either follow the marked lines by eye or use a mitre box to guide the saw blade.

On each piece of wood, mark the sloping shoulder of the joint, using a knife and mitre square. Extend the marked line across the adjacent faces with a try square. To remove the waste, either follow the marked lines by eye or use a mitre box to guide the saw blade.

Wood Working 101

Wood Working 101

Have you ever wanted to begin woodworking at home? Woodworking can be a fun, yet dangerous experience if not performed properly. In The Art of Woodworking Beginners Guide, we will show you how to choose everything from saws to hand tools and how to use them properly to avoid ending up in the ER.

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