Measuring And Marking Tools

Accurate marking-out is the key to good joint-making. A few basic tools enable you to measure out workpieces and to scribe dimension lines on solid wood and man-made boards.

Accurate marking-out is the key to good joint-making. A few basic tools enable you to measure out workpieces and to scribe dimension lines on solid wood and man-made boards.

How Joint Wood Joint Measurer

Steel rule

A metalworker's steel rule is useful for taking precise measurements, and doubles as a short straightedge for scribing dimension lines on a workpiece with a marking knife.

Straightedge

A strip of steel with one bevelled edge is useful for marking out long, straight lines, and is essential for checking that a surface is cut or planed flat.

Retractable tape measure

A good-quality, flexible steel tape measure is ideal for measuring all but the smallest workpieces. Choose one that is about 5m (16ft) long and is calibrated for both imperial and metric dimensions, so that you can convert one system to the other quickly and easily.

Try square

A necessary tool for checking the accuracy of right-angle joints and for marking lines at 90 degrees to an edge. Choose a square with a 300mm (1ft) blade.

Mitre square

The blade of a mitre square passes through the stock at an angle of 45 degrees. It is used to mark out and check the accuracy of mitre joints.

Sliding bevel

A sliding bevel is used for the same purpose as a mitre square, but its blade is adjustable to any angle.

Marking knife

The blade of a woodworker's marking knife is ground to a bevel on one side only, so that its flat face can be run against a steel rule or the blade of a square.

Dovetail template

A template designed for marking out standard dovetails. One blade is made for tails with a slope of 1:6, for softwoods, and the other slopes at 1:8, for hardwoods.

Marking gauge

Use a marking gauge to scribe a line parallel to a planed edge. It is made with a sharp steel pin fixed at one end of a wooden beam A fence or 'stock' that slides along the beam is clamped at the required distance from the pin, using a brass or plastic thumbscrew. The stock on a good-quality gauge is made with inset brass strips, to prevent wear.

Cutting gauge

Similar to a marking gauge, this tool is fitted with a small blade that passes through the beam and is held in place by a shallow metal wedge. It is used for marking lines across grain, where the pin of a marking gauge would tear the wood fibres.

Antique Marking Gauge

Cutting gauge

Mortise gauge

Mortise gauge

A marking gauge with a second, adjustable pin, used for scoring the two parallel sides of a mortise or tenon simultaneously. Most mortise gauges have another single pin on the opposite side of the beam, so that the tool can also be used as a standard marking gauge.

Mortise gauge

Cutting gauge

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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