Stoppedhousing Version

Make an even stronger version of this joint by incorporating a stopped housing that holds the pinned end of the shelf This joint is normally made with stopped pins. Cut the housing first. Allow for the depth of the housing when marking the shoulder line for the pins on the end of the shelf. When you have cut them, saw a notch out of the front edge of the shelf to accommodate the stopped end of the housing.

A pinned version of the joint comprises a row of evenly spaced, stubby tenons (pins) for fitting wide, fixed shelves or partitions into a cabinet. When the tenons pass right through the panel, they are usually held firmly in place with hardwood wedges set into sawcuts made across the end grain of each pin. For decorative reasons, the wedges are sometimes set diagonally.

shelf sioe panel

2 Cutting the mortises

Chop out the through mortises (see page 65), working from both sides of the panel.

3 Cutting the pins

Saw down the sides of the pins with a tenon saw, then remove the waste from between them with a coping saw. Trim the shoulders with a chisel.

1 Marking out the joint

Mark out the shelf as described for a twin mortise and tenon (see page 67), dividing the shoulder line with a row of evenly spaced pins. Modify the size of the pins to match your chisel. Mark the positions of the mortises, using the shelf as a template.

4 Wedging the pins

Make a diagonal saw cut across the end of each pin, down to the shoulder line. Having glued and assembled the joint, drive in glued wedges and leave to set before planing them flush with the panel.

The majority of tables and chairs are made with stopped mortise-and-tenon joints, with no obvious signs of the joint on the outside of the leg. It is a good-looking joint that is no more difficult to make than a through tenon, once you have learned how to accurately gauge the depth of the mortise.

1 Marking out the tenon

Score the shoulder line all round the rail (see page 64 for proportions), and scribe the thickness of the tenon with a mortise gauge.

3 Making a depth gauge

To gauge the depth of the mortise, lay the blade of the chisel on the marked rail, with its cutting edge aligned with the shoulder line. Wrap adhesive tape around the blade at a point just beyond the end of the rail.

3 Making a depth gauge

To gauge the depth of the mortise, lay the blade of the chisel on the marked rail, with its cutting edge aligned with the shoulder line. Wrap adhesive tape around the blade at a point just beyond the end of the rail.

2 Marking out the mortise

Use the rail as a guide for marking out the mortise position on the leg or stile. Square the lines across the edge of the work, and use the same gauge to scribe the mortise between them.

4 Cutting the joint

Cutting into one edge of the rail, chop out the mortise as described on page 65, stopping when the tape wrapped around the blade is level with the surface of the wood. Saw the tenon to match.

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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