Using A Router Plane

Having chiselled out most of the waste, pare the bottom of a housing level, using a special router plane fitted with a narrow, adjustable L-shape blade. When a panel is too wide to use a chisel conveniently; remove all the waste in stages by making several passes with the router plane, lowering the cutter each time the housing is level.

When cutting this joint by hand, incorporate a single dovetail along one side of the housing. Double-sided dovetails are best cut with a router (see page 51). Since the shelf member must be slid into place from one end of the housing, the

When cutting this joint by hand, incorporate a single dovetail along one side of the housing. Double-sided dovetails are best cut with a router (see page 51). Since the shelf member must be slid into place from one end of the housing, the

Sliding Dovetail Joint

1 Marking the shoulder

Set a cutting gauge to about one-third the thickness of the wood and score a shoulder line on the underside of the shelf. Using a try square and pencil, continue the line across both edges.

1 Marking the shoulder

Set a cutting gauge to about one-third the thickness of the wood and score a shoulder line on the underside of the shelf. Using a try square and pencil, continue the line across both edges.

Dovetail Joint Angle

2 Marking the dovetail angle

Set a sliding bevel to a dovetail angle (see page 82), and mark the slope of the joint, running from the bottom corner to the marks drawn on both edges.

2 Marking the dovetail angle

Set a sliding bevel to a dovetail angle (see page 82), and mark the slope of the joint, running from the bottom corner to the marks drawn on both edges.

Chisel Waste Wood Housing Joint
Saw along the shoulder line, down to the base of the slope, then pare out the waste with a chisel. To help keep the angle constant, use a shaped block of wood to guide the blade.

4 Cutting the housing

Mark out the housing as described opposite, and use the sliding bevel to mark the dovetail on both edges of the panel. Saw both shoulders, using a bevelled block of wood to guide the saw blade when cutting the dovetail. Remove the waste with a router plane, or use a bevel-edge chisel to clear the undercut.

Glazing Bar Halving Joint

side panel shelf

For decorative effect, the housing is often stopped short of the front edge of the side panel by about 9 to 12mm to J4in). Occasionally, the shelf is also cut short, fitting the housing exactly - useful when making a cupboard with inset doors. Generally, however, the front edge of the shelf is notched so that its front edge finishes flush with the side panel. The instructions below explain how-to cut the joint with handtools, but a power router is perhaps the ideal tool for cutting a stopped housing (see opposite).

Joints Cut With Router

shelf

1 Notching the shelf

Set a marking gauge to the planned depth of the housing, and use it to mark the notch on the front corner of the shelf. Cut the notch with a tenon saw.

3 Cutting the stopped end

To provide clearance for sawing the housing, first drill out the waste at the stopped end and trim the shoulders square with a chisel.

1 Notching the shelf

Set a marking gauge to the planned depth of the housing, and use it to mark the notch on the front corner of the shelf. Cut the notch with a tenon saw.

3 Cutting the stopped end

To provide clearance for sawing the housing, first drill out the waste at the stopped end and trim the shoulders square with a chisel.

shelf

Tenon Cutter Square

2 Marking the housing

Use the notched shelf to mark the dimensions of the housing, then score the lines across the side panel with a try square and marking knife. Scribe the stopped end of the housing with a marking gauge.

2 Marking the housing

Use the notched shelf to mark the dimensions of the housing, then score the lines across the side panel with a try square and marking knife. Scribe the stopped end of the housing with a marking gauge.

Tenon Saw Housing Joint

4 Sawing the housing

Saw along the scored shoulders down to the base of the housing, then pare out the waste from the back edge with a chisel, or use a router plane.

4 Sawing the housing

Saw along the scored shoulders down to the base of the housing, then pare out the waste from the back edge with a chisel, or use a router plane.

Machining the shelf

Set the work upright in a vice and clamp an L-shape guide batten on each side, flush with the end grain. Adjust the side fence to machine a dovetail along one side of the work, then reset the fence to dovetail the

How Cut Dovetail Joints

Cutting the notch

Notch the front end of the shelf using a tenon saw.

How Cut Dovetail Joints
Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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Responses

  • Santeri
    How to use a router plane?
    1 year ago
  • andrea
    How to use a router in a throgh housing joint?
    12 months ago

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