Glazing Bar Halving Joint Router Bits

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Adjust the saw blade to cut halfway through the workpiece. Saw one shoulder then slide the wood sideways and saw the second one. To cut identical shoulders on several pieces of wood, set up the saw so that you can butt each workpiece against the rip fence at one end and against a block of wood clamped to the mitre fence at the other Remove the waste by making several passes across the blade.

Glazing Joints Edges

2 Marking the depth of the joint

Set a marking gauge to exactly half the thickness of the wood, and scribe a line between the shoulders marked on the edges of both components.

Depth Gauge Table Saw

3 Cutting the joint

Saw halfway through both pieces of wood on the waste side of each shoulder line. Divide the waste wood between the shoulders with one or two additional saw cuts.

3 Cutting the joint

Saw halfway through both pieces of wood on the waste side of each shoulder line. Divide the waste wood between the shoulders with one or two additional saw cuts.

glazing-rabbet shoulder

Glazing Bars Router

glazing rabbet

2 Using a mitre box as a guide

Since it is difficult to mark a moulded section, it pays to hold the work in a mitre box, using the 90-degree guides when sawing the slots.

4 Cutting the cross halving joint

All that remains is to cut recesses in each component to form the actual halving joint. Cut the recesses down to the level of the glazing-rabbet shoulder.

Oblique Cross Halving Joint

3 Paring the mitres

Pare the waste on each side of the slots to form a 45-degree mitre. Make a mitre block from scrap wood to help guide the chisel blade at the required angle.

Cutting a halving joint in glazing bars involves a similar method to that used to cut a simple cross halving joint, but there are complications which result from joining moulded sections.

1 Cutting slots

Cut a narrow slot on each side of both moulded components, down to the level of the glazing-rabbet tongue. Make each slot as wide as the tongue.

3 Paring the mitres

Pare the waste on each side of the slots to form a 45-degree mitre. Make a mitre block from scrap wood to help guide the chisel blade at the required angle.

glazing-rabbet shoulder glazing rabbet

2 Using a mitre box as a guide

Since it is difficult to mark a moulded section, it pays to hold the work in a mitre box, using the 90-degree guides when sawing the slots.

4 Cutting the cross halving joint

All that remains is to cut recesses in each component to form the actual halving joint. Cut the recesses down to the level of the glazing-rabbet shoulder.

Cut Mitre Joints Table SawCross Halving Joint

This oblique joint is identical to the right-angle version, except for the fact that the recesses are set at an angle. Use a mitre square to mark out a 45-degree joint or a sliding bevel for other angles.

3 Cutting the joint

Saw and chisel out the waste as described for a right-angle cross halving joint (see page 56).

USING A TABLE SAW

Cut an oblique halving joint on a table saw as described on page 56, but set the mitre fence at an angle. Hold the work firmly against the fence to prevent it being drawn backwards by the saw blade.

USING A TABLE SAW

Cut an oblique halving joint on a table saw as described on page 56, but set the mitre fence at an angle. Hold the work firmly against the fence to prevent it being drawn backwards by the saw blade.

Scribe Mitre JointHow Use Tambour Hook

2 Marking the width of the recess

Mark the width of each recess, then use a try square to continue the shoulder lines down each edge. Scribe a line between them with a marking gauge set to half the wood's thickness.

Table Cut Half For Bar

1 Marking the shoulders

Score one shoulder line across one component and, placing the second piece of wood against the line, mark its width with a pencil. Score the line with a square and marking knife. Mark the other component similarly.

1 Marking the shoulders

Score one shoulder line across one component and, placing the second piece of wood against the line, mark its width with a pencil. Score the line with a square and marking knife. Mark the other component similarly.

2 Marking the width of the recess

Mark the width of each recess, then use a try square to continue the shoulder lines down each edge. Scribe a line between them with a marking gauge set to half the wood's thickness.

HALVING JOINTS

Corner halving joint

Corner Halving Joint

1 Marking the basic halving joint

Lay the components side-by-side, and mark the shoulder line across both of them. Continue the lines

Halving Joint

Corner halving joint

HALVING JOINTS

Mitred halving joint

You can construct a simple framework with halving joints at each corner, but since the joint relies almost entirely on the glue for strength, you may need to reinforce it with screws or dowels. Cut the joint by hand, using the method described below, or cut it on a power saw (see page 60). The mitred halving joint is a refined version, but with even less gluing area.

1 Marking the basic halving joint

Lay the components side-by-side, and mark the shoulder line across both of them. Continue the lines

2 Gauging the depth

Set a marking gauge to half the thickness of the wood and scribe a line up both edges and across the end grain. Remove the waste with a tenon saw, cutting downwards from the end grain, followed by sawing across the shoulder.

Mitred halving joint

Mitred Corner Joints

1 Marking a mitred corner

Mark and cut one component as described left, then cut the lap to 45 degrees. Score the angled shoulder line across the face of the second component, using a knife and mitre square, then scribe the centre line up the inner edge and across the end grain.

Corner Halving Joint

2 Cutting the angled shoulder

Clamp the work at an angle in a vice and saw on the waste side of the centre line, down to the shoulder. Lay the work on a bench hook, and remove the waste by sawing down the shoulder line.

2 Cutting the angled shoulder

Clamp the work at an angle in a vice and saw on the waste side of the centre line, down to the shoulder. Lay the work on a bench hook, and remove the waste by sawing down the shoulder line.

Table Saw Router Table Work CentreCross Halving JointTable Saw Router Table Work Centre

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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