To support the CDs in this case we used a unique pin and ledge system that vnakes the CDs appear to float in midair

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here are a lot of ways to "store" Jk CDs (compact discs). They can be stacked in a pile, filed in a shoe box, or if you spend a few bucks, housed in a simulated wood, CD rack. But as a woodworker, none of these options appealed to me. Instead, I took a little different approach and designed this CD storage case with several unique features to set it apart from other cases.

Like most cases, the CDs are stored horizontally so the titles are easy to read. What's a little different about this design is the CDs seem to be suspended in midair. Ef you look closely at Use photo at tight, you can see small support pins in one of the jjosts.

The posts are sandwiched between a plywood top and bottom. So I used several layers of molding on top to conceal the plywood. 1 also added molding to the bottom. But not to just conceal the plywood edges. This molding also hides a lazy susan turntable. This turntable makes it easy to spin the case around to any side so all the CDs are accessible.

CASE. Building the case forthis storage project is a little like building a house of cards. You have to start in the middle and work your way out Located in the center are four dividers that not only hold the discs, they also join the top and bottom, see Fig, 1. For this reason I started on the ease

DIVIDER MOLDING

ledge

Mounting holes

NOTE: Dividers consist of ttyO ¡.-shaped assemblies that are glued together tb 'diameter holes for posts

Mounting holes

NOTE: Dividers consist of ttyO ¡.-shaped assemblies that are glued together tb 'diameter holes for posts

DIVIDER MOLDING

ledge

DIVIDER MOLDING. To make the ends of the dividers look similar to the posts around it, I glued a piece of molding to the front edge. This dhider molding (B) is a W square piece of stock cut to match the divider blank lengtii (7%") with a hill roundover routed on the front edge, see Figs, 3 and 3a. Note: Because the bottom slot on the divider is offset differently from the other slots, the molding must be installed with the slots located on the right-hand side, see Fig, 3,

DIVIDER ASSEMBLY. With the molding rounded over, the dividers can be assembled in i>airs, see Fig. 3. This is simply a matter of gluing the back edges together so you end up with an L-shaped assembly.

LEDGES. Next, to fill the slots in the divider assemblies. I used small ledges (C). Since you need 40 ledges, an easy way lo cuL them is off the edge of '¿"-thick blank, see Fig. 3b. If you make the blank length the same as die slot length (51//1). die '-thick ledges ciin be sliced off like pieces of bacon. Then you simply glue the ledges in the dividers.

TOP/BOTTOM. At this point, the dividers can be set aside, and you can cut the tup (I>) and bottom (E) to finished size, see Fig. 4. These pieces of plywood sandwich the dividers and the posts. To hold these '/>"- diameter posts in position, holes are drilled around the perimeter of both pieces.

The only thing that you need to keep in mind is to lay out the hole location on both pieces so they're mirror images of each other. Before drilling any holes, I positioned die top piece over (he bottom and checked lo make sure the holes would line up, DIVIDER INSTALLATION. With the holes drilled for the posts, the dividers can be screwed to the bottom of the case, see Fig. 5a. The important thing is to install die dividers so the front edges line up with the jxist holes. Then mark the mounting hole locations, drill W-diameter mounting holes, and install

NOTE: Check that holes line up between the top and bottom

NOTE: Check that holes line up between the top and bottom

NOTE: Holes drilled in top and bottom are mirror images of each other

Width of saw blade

Bottom slot

torn edge

Width of saw blade

Bottom slot

NOTE: Glue on divider molding first. Then rout the roundover profile

NOTE: Glue on molding with slots located on right-hand side

DIVIDER MOLDING

NOTE: Glue on divider molding first. Then rout the roundover profile

NOTE: Glue on molding with slots located on right-hand side

Router table fence

CROSS SECTION

Divider

DIVIDER MOLDING

54" round-over

■ Use a zero clearance insert thick

Blank length matches slot

CROSS SECTION

SUPPORT POST

C$23

Bottom

With the dividers attached to the case bottom, you're ready to get started on the rest of the project.

POSTS. So next I cut the posts for the case sides. These posts are ail dia. dowels cut to the same length (8%"}. But four support posts (F). are unique. They have '/¿"-diameter pins added to support the CDs, see drawing at lefL

Drilling the holes in the support posts requires two things. You have to get the holes drilled in a straight line, and they have to be spaced the same as the ledges in the dividers. The key to doing this is using a V-btock and the extra divider you made earlier, see Fig. 6 and drawing at left. For more on this technique, refer to Shop Notes on page 16,

After the holes are drilled, I cut W-long pins (G) from a '/¿"-diameter dowel to fill them. For me, the safest way to do this is with a handsaw.

Now die pins can be glued in place. But getting glue in these small pin holes without making a mess is about as easy as threading a needle. So 1 used a toothpick to place a drop in each hole. Then install the pins, checking to be sure they're fully seated in the pin holes, see left margin.

ASSEMBLY, Now the case can be assembled. The first pieces to install are the support posts. They fit in the second hole of each section on the case bottom, see Fig. 7. But keep in mind as you install these posts that the

Case bottom

Lazy susan

Base

W-thick)

Clearance hole

Case bottom

Lazy susan pins on die postshave to point directly at (lie ledges on Uie dividers so they fully support the CDs,

To keep the support posts from turning, I put a little glue in the holes first. Then just to make sure they wouldn't move, I also pinned them with a small brad, see Fig. 7. Now put

Base

W-thick)

Clearance hole a little glue in the rest of the holes and install the other posts.

top. Widi all the posts in place, the top (D) can be installed, see drawing above. Since screws connect die top to the dividers you won't need any glue. It's a good thing too, Otherwise, glue would drip all over the place.

Place support posts in second holes

Drill pilot holes using a brad for a drill bit

NOTE: Position pins on support posts to point at ledges on dividers

Support post

Place support posts in second holes

Drill pilot holes using a brad for a drill bit

NOTE: Position pins on support posts to point at ledges on dividers

Support post

: Brad prevents support 4 *

post from turning H" brad

TOP HOLDING. To cover the exposed heads of the mounting screws in the case top and to conceal the plywood edges, I added several "layers" of built-up molding, see Fig, 8.

EDGE MOLDING. The fin;! layer of molding added to the top of the case is W-thlck edge molding (H), see Fig. 9. It covers the plywood edges, and it also provides a framework around the rest of the molding.

This lVV'-wide molding wraps around the case top. But before installing the molding, I routed two different profiles on the outer edges, see Fig. 9. First, there's a Vi" roundover on the bottom edge, see Fig. 9a. Next, I routed a V4" cove on the top edge, see Fig. 9b. Finally, miter the pieces to fit on the case and glue them in place

FRAME MOLDING. With theedge molding installed, the frame molding (1) can be added next, see Fig. 10. This is a l3/V'-wide piece of molding with a rabbet cut on one edge. The rabbet conccals the joint line between the edge and frame molding. But getting the depth of this rabbet set requires a bit of work.

The goal here is to get the lip of the rabbet flush with the top edge of the edge molding, see detail in Fig. 10. To do tills, I gradually raised the dado blade checking the fit often, see Fig. 10a. Once the rabbet fits flush with the edge molding, 1 softened the corner by routing a Vi" roundover, see Fig. l(>b. Then miter the molding to fit and glue it in place, see Fig. 8.

INSn PANEL. With the frame molding installed, it creates an opening on top of the case. I cut a -Vi "-thick plywood inset panel (J) with a rabbet cut on all four sides and glued it in the opening, see Figs. 11 and 11a.

INLAY MOLDING. This rabbet creates a groove for T-shaped inlay molding (K) dial's added next, see detail in Fig. 12. To cut this molding safely it's a good idea to start with an extra wide blank and rout a full roundover on one edge, see Fig. 12.

Next, set up a dado blade and cut a %"-wide groove on both faces to create the T-shape, see Fig. 12a. Then cut the molding free, see Fig. 12b. Now miter the ends and glue the molding in place, refer to Fig. 8.

CROSS SECTION

inlay molding

CROSS SECTION

inlay molding

NOTE: Rabbet all four/

edges o f panel '

Inlay molding

Cut molding free from blank

Inlay molding

Cut molding free from blank

frame molding

NOTE: All molding pieces are glued in place

EDGE MOLDING

frame molding

EDGE MOLDING

INLAY MOLDING

NOTE: All molding pieces are glued in place

CROSS

fOG£ MOLDING

-round-over cove bit

CROSS

fOG£ MOLDING

-round-over cove bit

CROSS SECTION fRAME MOLDING

Rabbet edge round-over bit

INSET PANEL

NOTE: Rabbet all four/

edges o f panel '

BOTTOM MOLDING. Just like the top of die CD case, the bottom also has molding added to hide the plywood edges. But this molding hangs down below the case bottom to conceal a lazy susan turntable and base see Fig. 13.

Making the Va11-thick bottom molding (JL) is a lot like making the edge molding (H) on top. It's also lW'-wicle, but instead of two profiles it has only the one W roundover on the top edge, see Figs. 14 and 14a. Then it's milered to fit around the case bottom ;ind glued in place.

LAZY SUSAN. After the molding is installed, all that's left to complete the CD holder is to install a lazy susan turntable and base, i made the base (M) by first gluing together two pieces of '/¡"-thick hardboard to create a '//-thick, 12" x 12" blank, see Fig. 15. Then draw a 11W circle on the hardboard and cut out the base.

Before screwing the base to the lazy susan don't forget to drill a clearance hole to match the one cut in the lazy susan. You'll need to use this hole to attach the lazy susan to the bottom of the case, see Fig. 17. Finally, screw tiie hardboard base to the lazy susan and the lazy susan to the the case bottom, see Figs, 16 and 17a. 01

BOTTOM MOLDING

NOTE:

Miter bottom moWing to fit case and glue in place

BOTTOM MOLDING

NOTE:

Miter bottom moWing to fit case and glue in place

round-over bit

BOTTOM MOLDING

NOTE: Cut base to size after glue dries

NOTE:

Giue hardboard together to create W-thlck base hardboard

NOTE: Cut base to size after glue dries

NOTE:

Giue hardboard together to create W-thlck base hardboard

F h woodscrew

NOTE: Clearance hole provides access for screwdriver

clearance hole

Lazy Susan Attached Door

Use #6 * 5/a"Rh woodscrews to attach base and lazy susan to case

NOTE: Center base and lazy susan on bottom of case tttzt*.

- Case bottom

Use #6 * 5/a"Rh woodscrews to attach base and lazy susan to case

NOTE: Center base and lazy susan on bottom of case

NOTE: Clearance hole provides access for screwdriver

clearance hole tttzt*.

- Case bottom

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