Legs

Tedswoodworking Plans

Ted's Woodworking Plans

Get Instant Access

CONTINUED

decorative cuts. After cleaning up the mortises I made a series of decorative cuts on the legs. Begin by cutting a slot around the top end of the legs. This is actually a 3/8" dado that's cut around all four sides.

To make this continuous dado, first set your dado blade to cut VV1 deep. Then position the rip fence lVfc" from the blade, see Fig. 6a. Shop Note: Using an auxiliary fence on your miter gauge will give you better control of the leg, and also prevent chipout as you cut the dadoes, see Fig. 6.

With the end of the leg butted to the fence, cut the dadoes on all four sides of each leg.

stopped chamfer. The next step is to rout the decorative "stopped" chamfers on the outside corner of each leg. see Fig 7. (Note: The outside corner is the corner formed by the sides without mortises.)

You could rout this chamfer with a handheld router. But since I was going to chamfer the top and bottom of the legs on the router table. 1 cut this stopped chamfer there, too.

Start by setting the height of the chamfer bit so it's Vi6" above the router table, see F ig. 8a. Then align the face of the fence so it's flush with the bearing on the bit.

To indicate the extremes of the stopped chamfer. I made two marks on each leg. One mark (5" from the top end) indicates where to plunge the router to start the chamfer. The second mark (15V¿" from the top) indicates the stopping point. Then I made a reference mark on the router fence to indicate the centerpoint of the router bit.

Now turn on the router, and with a pivoting motion, plunge the leg against the fence so the first mark on the leg lines up with the mark on the fence, see Fig. 8. Then slide the leg to the left. When the second mark on the leg lines up with the reference mark on the fence, stop and pivot the leg away from the fence, see Fig. 9.

top chamfers. Once the corner chamfers are completed, you can cut the chamfers on the top end of each leg. This is also a yi6"-wide chamfer so you don't have to change the router bit, see Fig. 10a.

To make cutting the chamfers more accurate, I used a 8" x 8" square piece of-W'-thick plywood as a push block, see Fig. 10. The push block keeps the legs square to the router table fence, and helps prevent chipout on the back edge of the cut.

Now cut the chamfers on the top of each leg. holding the leg firmly to the router table fence and plywood push block. Again, feed the leg from right to left.

bottom chamfers. Finally, to prevent the legs from splintering when the box is dragged across the ground. I routed smaller chamfers on the bottom ends of the legs. To do this, set the height of the router bit to ^16", see Fig. 10a. Then feed the legs over the bit, see Fig. 10.

START LINE

STOP UNE

START LINE

STOP UNE

PIVOT LEG AWAY WHEN REFRENCE MARKS ALIGN

FEED DIRECTION

FEED DIRECTION

PIVOT LEG AWAY WHEN REFRENCE MARKS ALIGN

3V-THICK PUSH BLOCK

LEG BOTTOM

CHAMFER BIT

CHAMFER BIT

3V-THICK PUSH BLOCK

LEG BOTTOM

Once the legs are complete, you can start work on the sides. Each side consists of two rails and four slats held in place with tongue and groove joints. rails. I started by resawing (from 2x4 stock) enough pieces for the rails (B) to 1W thick. Then cut eight rails to final width and length, see Fig. 11.

tenons. The rails have a l"-long tenon on each end to fit the mortises in the legs. To set up the saw, position the rip fence as a stop so the outside edge of a dado blade is 1" from the fence, see Fig. 12a.

Now, to create a centered tenon, make a pass on each face of a piece of scrap rail stock. Slowly sneak up on the final thickness of the tenon until it just fits the mortise. Then the tenons can be cut on the rails by making a series of passes over the dado blade.

To crcate shoulderson the top and bottom edges, re-set the height of the dado blade to W. Then stand the workpiece on edge and make a series of passes over each edge.

tongues. Once the tenons are cut on the rails, the saw can be set up to cut a tongue along one edge. This tongue holds the slats in place, see Fig. 13a. The W'-thick tongue is off-center on the thickness of the rail—it's set back -Vfe" from the face.

To make the tongue, the dado blade has to be "buried" in a wooden auxiliary fence so only W of the blade is exposed, see Fig. 14. Then raise the blade Vs" above the table. Now, with the face side of the rail down, cut one side of the tongue, see Step 1.

Then, lower the blade and cut the other side, leaving a W'-thick tongue, see Step 2.

chamfer the rails. The last step in making the rails is to chamfer three of the four edges (not the edge closest to the tongue). Chamfer the other edge on the tongue side with the fence set back W' from the bit, see Step 1, Fig. 15. For the remaining edges, align the bearing flush with the fence, see Step 2.

siats. After the tongued rails are complete, the grooved slats (C) can be made to fit between the rails, refer to Fig. 13. (There are four slats on each side.)

To determine the width of each slat, measure the shoulder-to-shouder length of a rail (14Vs") and subtract Vfc" to allow for expansion. Then divide by four. (This made each of my slats 31/2" wide, see Fig. 16.)

Now cut the slats to length to equal the distance between the mortises on the legs.

groove the slats. With the slats cut to size, cut a W'-wide groove in the ends to fit the tongues on the rails, see Fig. 16. Note: Offset the groove ^8" from the front face, see Fig 16a.

chamfer. To complete the side slats, chamfer all four edges on the face side.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
A Newbies Guide To Wood Working

A Newbies Guide To Wood Working

Wonder No Longer About Things Like Designs, Tools And Safety. These Problems Among Others Will Be Covered In This E-Book. You Will Be Creating Great Wooden Works Of Art In Very Little Time At All! For The Beginning Woodworker, The Construction of Handcrafted Wood Creations Can Be a Daunting And Overwhelming Experience. Well, Not Anymore!

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment