Top Slats

Each of the four openings contains eight slats. The slats start out as blanks of differing lengths that are individually cut to fit.

rip slats to width. The top slats (C.D.E.F.G) fit into the frame openings with equal W-wide spacing between them, see Fig. 7. To determine how wide each slat should be, first measure across the widest part of the opening. (All four openings must be the same size.)

Then, to allow for nine VsM-wide gaps, subtract 1V&" from this measurement. Finally, divide this figure by eight to obtain the desired width of the slats. (In my case, 2 W.)

Now enough 3/4"-thick stock for all 32 slats can be cut to this finished width, refer to the Cutting Diagram on page 7.

citto rough length. With the stock for the slats ripped to uniform width, they can be cut to length. To minimize waste, I started by first cutting them to five different rough lengths, refer to parts C,D,E,F, and G in the Materials List on page 7.

measure .and fit. The procedure for cutting the slats to finished length is the same for each of the four openings. So for each opening, first cut a 45" miter across the outside end of the five shortest slat blanks, see Fig. 7 and the Exploded View on page 7.

Next, position the slats over the opening with a W-thick temporary spacer positioned on both sides of each slat. Now make a pencil mark on the inside end of all eight slats to indicate where it meets the edge of the cross brace, see Fig. 7. Then cross-cut each slat to finished length at the pencil mark.

rabbets. The slats should fit in the openings now, but they won't be flush with the top surface of the table frame. To get them flush, cut rabbets on the ends of each slat, see Figs. 8 and 9.1 cut the rabbets with a dado blade on the table saw.

round-overs. Now round over all four top edges of each slat with a Vfe" round-over bit in the router table. (Note: The bearing on the router bit has to be removed for routing the rabbeted ends, see Shop Notes, page 17.)

install the siats. Next, to maintain a uniform space between the slats, I tacked them in place, one at a time, through the rabbeted ends, see Fig. 9. Position the temporary Vfc" spacers between each slat as they are tacked down, refer to Fig. 7.

keeper strips. When all the slats have been tacked in place, rip enough W-thick stock for keeper strips (H) to a finished width of W, see Fig. 9. Then cut each keeper strip to fit, and screw them under the slats, see Fig. 10. Note: Don't glue the keeper strips in place. This way it's no problem to replace damaged or broken slats later.

note: top face is up

ROUT ' «" ROUND-OVER ON INSIDE EDGES

note:

BOTTOM FACE IS UP

DIRECTION OF FEED

FRAME

note:

ROUT H" RABBET 1" DEEP AROUND INSIDE EDGES OF FOUR OPENINGS

ROUT > 4" ROUND-OVER ON TOP AND BOTTOM OF OUTSIDE EDGES

RABBETTING BIT ;

cross section

CUT KEEPER STRIPS TO FIT ACROSS ENDS OF SLATS

slats second:

CROSS CUT INSIDE END TO FIT

ROUT 1 »" ROUND-OVER ON TOP EDGES OF AU SLATS

first:

CUT 45" MITER ON OUTSIDE v END

'v-thick spacer gg-

keeper strip

KEEPER STRIP

#6 x1"Fh WOODSCREWS

note:

BOTTOM FACE IS UP

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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  • kristin
    How to make a slat patio table?
    9 years ago

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