Cut The Tenons Width

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Make two rip cuts on the right side of the tenoning jig. They establish the tenon width.

Mark the width of the tenon directly from the mortise.

There isn't any fussy micro-adjust on this jig. Simply nudge the fence with your fist.

Micro Adjust Jig

Raise the blade about l/32-in. lower than che shoulder to avoid cutting into it.

9 Rip the tenon to width. First, move the fence to the left side of the saw blade. Clamp the rail to the right side of the tenoning jig and adjust the fence until the blade lines up with the marks.

Trim the oak sides flush with the bottom of the tapered plywood. Make a 3/4 in. x 12 in. x 48 in. plywood sled with wood stops to center the column.Add a long fence to your miter gauge and use it to guide the sled through the saw.

Cut the column top, then remove an additional 5/8-in. section to make room for the astragal (see Photo 6).The S/8-in. strip, plus the l/8-in. saw kerf create a 3/4-in.gap that gets filled by the astragal.

Screw the column parts on the column backer starting with the base and working up. Drill pilot holes and screw them in place from behind.

fronts and sides (parts Q and R) with glue and nails.

10. Attach the column base, bottom, astragal and top to the column backer (Photo 6).

11. Join parts A and B to create the mantel face frame. Position the lower rail to accommodate the tile you've chosen. (We used 8 in. x 8-in. tiles. The actual size will vary.)

12. Assemble the mantel wall returns by screwing the cleats

13. Make the built-up mantel top by gluing the bottoms and underlayment (T2 and T3) to the top (Tl).

14. Glue 1/4-in.-thick edge banding (S) to the outside edges. Be sure to miter the outside corners of the edge banding.

For safety and convenience, don't overtook these items when planning and installing your project: / Fire codes generally require that 3/4-in.-thick wood be kept 6 in. away from the edge of a fireplace opening to prevent radiant heat from scorching it. For wood that protrudes I -1/2 in. or more, such as the front columns of this project, the wood must be at least 12 in. away from the fireplace opening. / Use thin-set mortar to apply the new tile or stone around the fireplace front and hearth. /You must put electrical receptacle box extenders on any electrical boxes that end up behind the cabinet. Don't be tempted to remove the covers and bury the receptacles in the wall.This would violate electrical codes.The extender slips over the receptacle.

Safety Considerations

Fig. B. Outlet Extender

Outlet extenders allow you to safely extend wall outlets through the cabinet back.

RECEPTACLE OUTLET BOX

RECEPTACLE OUTLET BOX

Receptacle Extender Box

extends inside the box and covers the cut-out in the plywood backs of the cabinets, as shown here.You can find box extenders at electrical supply retailers and home centers. Be sure to shut off the power to the box you're working on. /You'll probably want to install new electrical receptacles in the cabinet bases or in the floor to make up for the receptacles left inside the cabinets. Hire a licensed electrician to do the job. /The glass in the bookcase doors must be either safety glass (plastic film between two thin layers of glass) or tempered glass.This reduces the danger of injury from broken glass. Both types are more expensive than regular glass, and require professional cutting.

Modular Bookcase

Building the Bookcases

1. Assemble the bookcases (parts V through Z) using 2-in. wood screws (Photo 7). Then, drill holes for the adjustable shelves.

2. Glue and ciamp the face frames to each cabinet.

3. Biscuit or dowel the door frames together.

4. Rabbet the doors for the glass panels (Photo 8} and add the glass retainers.

5. Mount the doors to the bookcases using no-mortise hinges (see Sources, page 83).

6. Make half-lap joints for the muntins on your tablesaw and assemble with a drop of glue.

7. Build-up and edge-band the bookcase tops in the same manner as the mantel top.

8. Cut and edge-band the shelves.

Fig. E. Mantel Installation

Screw the columns to the face frame and the wall returns to the columns. Slide the whole assembly against the wall and nail the wall returns to the wall cleats and the face frame to the fireplace projection.

NAIL

WALL-

RETURNS

COLUMN ASSEMBLY

WALL CLEATS K3

CLEAT K1

FIREPLACE PROJECTION

SCREW

FACE J FRAME

6d TYP.

Screw the cabinet boxes together.

Attach the backs using screws every 6 in.The cabinet backs will "square up" the boxes and strengthen them.

Screw the cabinet boxes together.

Attach the backs using screws every 6 in.The cabinet backs will "square up" the boxes and strengthen them.

Rout the rabbets for the glass panels and square the corners with a chisel. Note: Have the glass cut 1/8 in. less than the rabbet width and height to insure a good fit.

Rout the rabbets for the glass panels and square the corners with a chisel. Note: Have the glass cut 1/8 in. less than the rabbet width and height to insure a good fit.

Fig. F. Cutting Diagrams

V Ti

Hold the filler strip in place and scribe to fit the adjacent wall.Then, nail the strip onto the cabinet stiSe.

Stripe Stise

Scribe the top for a tight fit against the back wall. Then cover any gaps along the fireplace projection with trim molding (FF).

Secure the muntins to the glass with silicone caulk after the finish is dry. Ml

CUTTING LIST

Part

Name

Qty.

Dimensions

Material

A

fireplace stiles

2

3/4" x 4" x 50-1/2"

oak

B

fireplace rails

2

3/4" x 3" x 54"

oak

C

column backer stiles

4

3/4" x 4" x 50-1/2"

oak

D

column backer rails

8

3/4" x 4" x 3-1/2"

oak

E1

cabinet stiles

2

3/4" x 3" x 44-1/2"

oak

E2

cabinet stiles

2

3/4" x 4" x 44-1/2"

oak

F1

cabinet upper rails

2

3/4" x 3" x 42"

oak

F2

cabinet lower rails

2

3/4" x 5" x 42"

oak

G

upper door rails

4

3/4" x 2-1/4" x 16-7/16"

oak

H

door stiles

8

3/4" x 2-1/4" x 36-7/16"

oak

J

lower door rails

4

3/4" x 3" x 16-7/16"

oak

K1

cleats

2

3/4" x 3/4" x 50-1/2"

pine

K2

cleats

2

3/4" x 3/4" x 21-1/4"

pine

K3

wall cleats

6

3/4" x 3-1/2" x 10"

pine

L

wall returns

2

3/4" x 22-3/4" x 50-1/2"

oak plywood

M

taper-cut plywood

2

3/4" x 9-1/2" x 45-1/2"

plywood

N1

column sides

4

3/4" x 1-1/4" x 48"

oak

N2

column faces

2

1/4" x 11" x 46-1/2"

oak; trim to fit

P

column astragals

2

3/4" x 2-1/4" x 7-7/8"

oak

Q

column base fronts

2

3/4" x 5" x 11"

oak

R

column base sides

4

3/4" x 5" x 1-3/4"

oak

S

top edge banding

22 ft.

1/4" x 1-1/2"

oak

T1

mantel top

1

3/4" x 26-3/4" x 88-1/2"

oak plywood

T2

mantel underlayment front

1

3/4" x 4" x 88-1/2"

oak plywood

T3

mantel underlayment sides

2

3/4" x4" x 26-3/4"

oak plywood

U1

cabinet tops

2

3/4" x 15-1/4" x 52"

oak plywood

U2

cabinet top underlayment

4

3/4" x 4" x 52"

oak plywood

V

cabinet sides

4

3/4" x 12" x 44-1/2"

oak plywood

W

cabinet bottoms

2

3/4" x 12" x 43"

oak plywood

X

partitions

2

3/4" x 11-3/4" x 38-3/4"

oak plywood

y

cabinet top strips

4

3/4" x 4" x 43"

oak plywood

z

cabinet backs

2

3/4" x 44-1/2" x 40-1/2"

oak plywood

AA

unfaced shelves

8

3/4"x 11-5/8"x 21"

oak plywood

BB

shelf and partition facing

30 ft.

1/4" x 3/4"

oak

CC

filler strips

2

3/8" x 3" x 44-1/2"

oak

DD

horizontal muntins

4

3/8" x 3/4" x 16-7/16"

oak

EE

vertical muntins

8

3/8" x 3/4" x 8"

oak

FF

trim

20 ft.

1/2" X 3/4"

Steve Wall Lumber Co., (800) 633-4062, www.walllumber.com 60 bd. ft. FAS quarter-sawn white oak, ($4.50 per bd, ft., plus s&h) and five 3/4" x 4x8 B-2 grade rift-sawn white oak plywood ($70 per sheet, plus s&h).

The Home Depot

Two qts. Minwax Early American No. 230

oil stain,

One gal. Minwax satin polyurethane.

Woodworkers' Hardware, (800) 383-0130 16 glass retainers,#EZ004; 35 cents each, 4 door magnets, part #A09798W; $2.50 each,

48 l/4-in. shelf pins, #HB86C25; 10 cents each,

8 no-mortise hinges, #A03175TB DAE; $3 each.

Van Dyke's Restorers, (800) 558-1234 4 door pulls, #CG-02004761; $39 each.

SILICONE CAULK

Resawing can push a handsaw to its limits, so its important to get one that can handle the job.

Bandsaws are well known for their ability to cut curves, but they can also perforin the unique function of wide resawing. The ability to resaw can add a whole new dimension to your woodworking. You can save money by making your own thin lumber, or produce bookmatched panels (Photo 3). With the right machine you can even make your own lumber {Photo 2)!

One of the questions we hear most often from woodworkers shopping for a bandsaw is,"How will it perform for resawing?" We focused this test in response to that question.

Our test concentrated on bandsaws that have a resaw capacity of 9 in. to 12 in. and are priced between $350 and $1,350. Within this field we found 17 machines; ten 14 in., one 16 in.,and six 18-in. Among the 14-in, bandsaws, we included only those that could saw 9 in. or greater or had a riser block kit available. A riser block (Photo 1) typically adds 6 in. to the resaw capacity, giving most 14-in. bandsaws 12-in. resaw capacity. At $50 to $100, a riser block kit is an inexpensive way to gain that extra resaw height.

To test the saws, we resawed 8-in.-wide hard maple and 8-in.-wide pine boards. We used new 3/4-in.-wide blades. We pushed the machines pretty hard to get some separation between those that could cut it and those that couldn't. For those that did well, we pushed even harder using hard maple boards as wide as 12 in.

Resawing Needs Power

Power is the biggest factor affecting a bandsaws ability to resaw. Machines in our test group had ratings from 3/4 to 2 hp (Fig. A). We found that 1 hp is the minimum needed for resawing. You can resaw on the 3/4-hp machines, but they are slow and likely to test your patience. {See Workshop Tips, Easier Resawing, page 23, for a way to deal with an under-powered bandsaw.)

Power is important, but you also need adequate blade speed. Machines with blade speeds of 3,000 sfpm (surface feet per minute) or higher performed best. Some machines have multiple speeds, but this is not an advantage because these speeds are well below 3,000 sfpm and easily bogged down.

American Woodworker AUGUST2001

AFRESH SHARP BLADE IS CRITICALLY IMPORTANT

WHEN RESAWING.

WELDED-STEEL FRAME

CAST-IRON FRAME

Resawing Requires the Right Blade

It's very important to use a blade that's fresh and sharp when resawing. If you don't, you're likely to get excessive blade wander, chatter and a slow feed rate. The width of the blade is also important. A 3/4 in. to 1-in.-wide blade with 3 to 4 tpi (teeth per inch) is a good choice. (For more information on handsaw blades, look for our Bandsaw Blade Tool Test in the next issue of American Woodworker.)

4 Two frame styles. During heavy resawing the welded-steel frame (right) resists vibration better than most of the bandsaws with cast-iron frames (left).

3Bookmatching lumber with unusual grain patterns is one of the many wonderful applications of resawing. Once resawn.the two parts can be glued together and used as a decorative door or cabinet panel.

welded-steel and cast-iron (Photo 4). All of the welded-steel frame machines had a very solid feel during resawing and did a good job of dampening vibration under a heavy resaw load. Among the cast-iron frame machines, the Delta and Enco resisted vibration best.

A sturdy base also helps dampen vibrations. For this reason we favor the closed- and the floor-base styles over the panel- and open-base models (PhotoS).

WELDED-STEEL FRAME

CAST-IRON FRAME

Dust Collection is a Must

Resawing produces a lot of sawdust so good dust collection is essential. All but one of the machines have some sort of dust port. Some are located under the table, others are found in front or behind the lower wheel (Photo 6). Port sizes vary from 3/4 in, to 4 in. in diameter.

We hooked tip a shop vacuum to the machines and found dust collection to be only fair on machines with dust ports less than 2-1/2-in. in diameter. That's because the actual opening on the machine was smaller than the dust port and this restricted air flow. Larger ports on the larger machines worked best when hooked up to a central dust collection system. If your bandsaw lacks adequate dust collection, check out Workshop Tips, "Better Bandsaw Dust Collection," page 16.

6 Good dust collection Is important when resawing.The 3-in. diameter rear dust port on this Powermatic provides good air flow and also helps keep the hose out of the operator's way. Several machines had dust ports that could accept a shop vacuum hose but the actual opening behind the dust port on the machine was small and restricted air flow.

Guide Style

G S

Wheel

Covers

Easily Accessible Tensioning Knob

Rip Fence

Comments and Source

Blocks

two-piece

No

Yes

Yes

Optional

Very robust micro adjustment system;

front guard awkward to adjust; {800) 438-2486.

Blocks

two-piece

Yes

Yes

Yes

Optional

Very robust micro-adjustment system;

front guard awkward to adjust; (800} 438-2486.

Blocks

one-piece

No

Yes

No

Stock

Optional ball-bearing guide available; riser block difficult to install; (800) 523-4777.

Blocks

one-piece

Yes

No

No

Stock

Optional ball-bearing guide available; riser block difficult to install; (800) 523-4777.

Blocks

telescoping

Yes

Yes

Yes

Optional

Lower micro adjustment difficult to access; (800) 274-6848.

Blocks

telescoping

Yes

Yes

Yes

Optional

Lower micro adjustment difficult to access; (800) 274-6848.

Blocks

telescoping

Yes

Yes

Yes

Optional

Lower guides difficult to adjust; LeNeave Machinery; (800) 442-2302.

Blocks

telescoping

No

No

No

Optional

Blade speed insufficient for resawing; Trendlines; (800) 767-9999.

Blocks

telescoping

Yes

Yes

Yes

Optional

Very nice 3/4-hp saw for general bandsawing; (800) 474-3443.

Blocks

one-piece

Yes

No

No

Stock

Double-drive pulleys and belts; (800) 873-3626.

Blocks

one-piece with rack-and-pinion

Yes

Yes

Yes

Stock

Optional ball-bearing guide available; lacks tension gauge; (800) 523-4777.

Euro Guides

one-piece with rack-and-pinion

Yes

Yes

Yes

Stock

Very nice stock rip fence; (800) 274-6848.

Euro Guides

one piece

Yes

Yes

Yes

Stock

Options! nonmetallic guides available; (800) 332-4094.

Blocks

one-piece with rack-and-pinion

Yes

Yes

Yes

Stock

Lacks tension gauge and tension spring, which could lead to biade over-tensioning; (800) 786-3747.

Blocks

one-piece

Yes

No

No

Stock

Blade speed too slow for resawing; LeNeave Machinery; (800) 442-2302.

Bearing

one-piece

Yes

Yes

Yes

Optional

Guides were difficult to adjust; (800) 248-0144.

Blocks

one-piece

Yes

No

No

Stock

Blade speed too slow for resawing; C.P. Tools; (800) 654-7702.

Tool Test

® Laglima i oaLS 16

EDITORS' CHOICE

PROS

• Welded-steei frame

■ Optional nonmetallic block guides available

• Prewired and fully assembled

CONS

• Requires 220 service

• Lacks rack-and-pinion guard adjustment.

BEST BUY

Jet JW14CS 14 in. with riser block; $650

PROS

• lelescoping front blade guard

• Accepts nonmetallic guide blocks.

CONS

• Micro-adjustment knobs on bottom blade guide are hard to access.

BEST BUY

Delta 28-280 14 in. with riser block; $790

PROS

• Accepts nonmetallic guide blocks

• Heaviest cast-iron frame among the 14-in. saws.

CONS

• Front blade guard difficult to keep aligned

® Laglima i oaLS 16

EDITORS' CHOICE

PROS

• Welded-steel frame

■ One-piece front guard with rack-and-pinion guard adjustment

■ Well-designed rip fence included with saw.

CONS

■ Only available with Euro-style guides

Edited by Randy Johnson

Small Shop

I got fed up with dragging my stationary tools around my garage to make room for my car, so I built mobile bases. Unlike some shop-made bases, this design adds only about 1 in. to the height of my tools. I made them out of 2x4s and plywood, fastened with glue and screws. The foot levers keep the base from rolling while I'm operating the machine. Cost? It was about $40 for my jointer base, and worth every penny.

Brian K. Off Germantown, MD

Source

Woodworker's Supply, (800) 645-9292 3-in. swivel caster. 210-1 b. capacity, #80

OVERALL CASTER HEiGHT MINUS 1"

3/8" DOWEL

PLYWOOD

WOOD SCREW

American Woodworker august2001

Small Shop Tips

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