Laminate

Jim Morgans Wood Profits

Wood Profits by Jim Morgan

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1 Cut short lengths of PVC using the tablesaw. Caution: To prevent kickback, use a V-shaped cradle and raise the blade just enough to cut through the pipe's wall.

4 Clamp the gate body together and add the sides. Once the sides are secure, remove the clamps and blade. Add a handle to the blade, and you're ready to go!

3 Make the gate's blade and sides from plastic laminate. Add tape to the blade to provide clearance during assembly. Assemble the gate with glue.

2 Glue the PVC into two pieces of MDF covered with plastic laminate. This creates each half of the gate body. Use a flush-trim bit to finish off the holes in the laminate.

1 Cut short lengths of PVC using the tablesaw. Caution: To prevent kickback, use a V-shaped cradle and raise the blade just enough to cut through the pipe's wall.

6. When the glue has hardened, drill a hole through the laminate. Use a drill bit that's about 1/4" larger in diameter than your flush-trim router bit. Use your router to enlarge the hole (Photo 2).

Make the blade and sides

7. Make the gate's blade by joining two 7" x 14" pieces of laminate back to back with laminate adhesive. Cut this piece to 5-15/16" x 13".

8. Use double-faced tape to temporarily attach the blade to the laminated face of the inlet gate body. Position the end of the blade 1" past the 6" square (the 1" margin leaves room for a handle). Drill a hole in the blade and use a flush-trim bit to enlarge the hole, as you did in Step 6.

9. Make the gate sides from two 1-1/2" x 6-1/2" pieces of laminate. Apply a 1/8" wide strip of tape to the middle of the back of each piece. The tape prevents adhesive from sticking to this area.

10. Soften the sharp edges of all laminate pieces with a file or sandpaper.

Assembly

11. To create clearance for the blade when you assemble the gate, put two layers of painter's tape near the edges of one face of the blade (Photo 3). Rub paste wax on the faces of the gate halves. Apply strips of tape down the middle of the side pieces, to prevent the pieces from adhering to the blade.

12. Carefully apply laminate adhesive to the backs of the gate sides and two edges of each gate body. Avoid getting adhesive on the faces of the gate halves. Remove the strips of tape from the gate sides before the adhesive sets up.

13. Once the laminate is dry to the touch, position the blade between the gate halves. Lightly clamp everything together and apply the side strips (Photo 4). Be careful: You only get one chance to position the sides. Use a roller or rubber mallet to ensure the sides make a good bond with the gate halves. Trim the sides flush with a router.

14. Remove the blade from the gate and peel off the tape. Clean and wax the blade. Screw handles to each end of the blade.

OTo see a VIDEO on how Alan built an automatic system for opening and closing blast gates, go to: www.AmericanWoodworker.com/WebExtras

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2 Glue the PVC into two pieces of MDF covered with plastic laminate. This creates each half of the gate body. Use a flush-trim bit to finish off the holes in the laminate.

3 Make the gate's blade and sides from plastic laminate. Add tape to the blade to provide clearance during assembly. Assemble the gate with glue.

4 Clamp the gate body together and add the sides. Once the sides are secure, remove the clamps and blade. Add a handle to the blade, and you're ready to go!

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Embellish the basic shape to create variations. Adding a head and unique details, such as lips and a necklace show individuality that's not always found on factory-made lures.

Most lures are simply shaped, so they're easy to turn with a skew chisel or detail/ spindle gouge. Cylinders and elliptical shapes like this one are typical. Sizes vary, depending on the type of fish you want to catch.

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Create a lure with an offset snout by turning on two different centers. Turn the body with the blank centered between the ends. Then offset the blank's mounting point at the tailstock end to turn the snout.

Add a hollowed-out collar to create additional sound and surface disturbance. The hollow shape makes the lure chug and pop as it's pulled across the water. To hollow the collar, cut in with a skew chisel, long point down.

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WHEN t PICKED UP Dudley Murphy and Rick Edmisten's Fishing Lure Collectibles (see Sources, page 71), my interests in fishing, antiques and wood turning met head-on: Now I'm hooked on making wooden fishing lures. I know this passion is somewhat irrational, because plastic lures are abundant and economical—and they catch fish. I make my own wooden lures because it's fun. I love recreating old patterns as much as I love to explore my own theories on catching fish. I enjoy testing unusual shapes and unique finishes. And I can report first-hand that catching a fish with a lure I've made myself is delightful. You should try it yourself.

I like to fish for bass, musky and pike, which are all known to feed at the surface, so most of the lures that I make are designed to skip across the water. These "top water" lures can be made from almost any wood that holds screws well. (There's nothing worse than having a trophy fish escape because it was able to rip out the screw that anchored the hook to the lure!) I usually work with poplar and start with 1-1/2" to 1-3/4" square blocks. My bass lures range from 2" to 5" in length, while my musky and pike lures tend to be 5" to 11" long.

Use your imagination

Usually, turning a wooden lure is basic spindle work, but the shapes you can experiment with are almost endless. Mimic a minnow or a small fish, a crawfish, a frog, a mouse, a bug, or a bird. Sometimes the turning doesn't resemble anything specific from nature.

Most lures are simply shaped, so they're easy to turn with a skew chisel or detail/ spindle gouge. Cylinders and elliptical shapes like this one are typical. Sizes vary, depending on the type of fish you want to catch.

Embellish the basic shape to create variations. Adding a head and unique details, such as lips and a necklace show individuality that's not always found on factory-made lures.

Add a hollowed-out collar to create additional sound and surface disturbance. The hollow shape makes the lure chug and pop as it's pulled across the water. To hollow the collar, cut in with a skew chisel, long point down.

Create a lure with an offset snout by turning on two different centers. Turn the body with the blank centered between the ends. Then offset the blank's mounting point at the tailstock end to turn the snout.

Turning Wood continued continued

Most lure shapes are turned between centers with basic tools (Photos 1 and 2). If you're adept with a skew chisel, you can complete most of the work using it alone. Use the skew or a 1/2" round-nose scraper to create a detail that gives the lure more "action" (Photo 3). Use a 3/8" detail/ spindle gouge and turn from two different centers to create a lure with an unusual face (Photo 4).

Refer to old lure shapes you find appealing, or use your imagination to dream up your own shapes (Photo 5). Whatever the shape, it'll take only minutes to complete, so you might as well turn several at a time (Photo 6).

To eliminate any chance of a fish ripping out the hook, attach the hook to a length of stainless steel wire (.030"—.040") that runs all the way through the lure (Photo 7). Drill a 1/8" hole and glue in 1/8" aluminum tubing to house the wire. Then insert the wire and use pliers to create loops at both ends for tying on the lure and for mounting the hook. This through wire also creates a nice foundation for adding propellers, beads and other details.

What fish want

To attract fish, wooden lures are usually painted, and they almost always have eyes—as far as I can tell, fish just don't appreciate plain wood.

Historically, lures were brush-painted, dipped, marbled or sprayed. Red was often used as the primary color, or for details, in the belief that predator fish would view it as blood, a sign of injury. Examples decorated with real frog skin have also been documented. All of these options are open to the contemporary lure maker (except, perhaps, the frog skin option).

Create your own designs. I call this one the "Leapin' Lacer." The turning is just a squat-shaped ellipse with hollowed collars at both ends. But to a largemouth bass, the completed lure will look like a tasty frog (Photo 10).

Most lures take ten minutes or less to turn, so it makes sense to turn multiples, whether they're unique or all the same. Leave the waste attached for now—it makes painting much easier.

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Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

Woodworking Tools and Installation Tips

There are a lot of things that either needs to be repaired, or put together when youre a homeowner. If youre a new homeowner, and have just gotten out of apartment style living, you might want to take this list with you to the hardware store. From remolding jobs to putting together furniture you can use these 5 power tools to get your stuff together. Dont forget too that youll need a few extra tools for other jobs around the house.

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