Cope the Profile

With the profile clearly marked out, the next step is to cut along the layout line with a coping saw. There are just a few things to point out here. First, I like to mount the blade in my coping saw so the teeth point away from the handle. This allows you to cut on the downstroke while still working from above (see drawing). Not only do I find this more comfortable, it allows me to keep my eye on the layout line as I'm cutting.

Second, instead of starting at one end of the profile and trying to follow it all the way along, it's easier to cut the profile in sections. By coming in from different angles, you can cut into comers and tight curves that the saw wouldn't otherwise be able to navigate. Start by cutting out the larger curves first, then come back and cut the shoulders and smaller sections of the profile.

Finally, I hold the saw at a slight angle as I'm cutting the profile to create a back bevel on die coped piece. (You don't need much of a back bevel — three to five degrees is fine.) This way, you're certain the two pieces of molding will fit together tightly at the front of the joint, where it counts.

blade Pencil

Cut up to pencil line

Waste

NOTE: Angle saw slightly to create back bevel

Waste

TOP VIEW

Cut up to pencil line

Waste

NOTE: Angle saw slightly to create back bevel blade Pencil

Waste

TOP VIEW

END VIEW

No gaps are visible with proper fit

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment