Bed Headboard Routed Edge Profile

When it came to installing the cap on the headboard of the bed, I used dowels to keep the pieces aligned and create a stronger joint. I just had to make sure sure the holes in the top of the legs lined up with the holes in the bottom of the cap.

To do this, I used dowel centers. I drilled the holes in the legs first. Then I placed a dowel center in each hole and centered the cap on the headboard. By pressing down on the cap, the dowel centers made "dimples" in the bottom of the cap, letting me know exactly where to drill the matching holes. S3

down on dowel

'/2"-dia. dowel centers

Easy Building Projectsbfor Kids

Drill holes in- -

SIDE SECTION VIEW

Drill holes in- -

SIDE SECTION VIEW

'/2"-dia. dowel centers down on dowel

Heirloom Project

rame

Take a frame from basic to outstanding with a few small pieces of veneer and pre-made inlays and marquetry patterns.

Heirloom Project

Icing on the cake — that's what this project is all about. Just take a look at the photo above and the drawing on the opposite page to see what I mean.

The frame joinery is just butt joints reinforced with splines. But then, the frame is dressed up with figured veneer, marquetry medallions, inlay strips, and stringing that really make it stand out from the crowd. While this may sound complicated, it's not.

The inlay and marquetry pieces are pre-made from different species of wood that are sliced thin, dyed, and then glued together. All you have to do is arrange them on the workpiece and then cut them to suit your needs. There are dozens of inlay patterns, veneer choices, and marquetry medallions available. For a couple of other ideas, take a look at page 39 or the sources on page 49.

With this frame, I'll show you the techniques and give you the information you'll need to successfully work with these pieces on this project or any other you'd like to build.

Stop holds mirror in place without rattling

For veneer and inlay sources, turn to page 49

Beveled mirror sits in rabbet routed on back of frame

D-ring hangers

Kraft paper backing protects back of mirror from scratches

Mirror can be hung horizontally or vertically

Frame pieces covered with burl veneer and pre-made inlay strips

Rails made from inexpensive hardwood

Hardwood edging conceals sides of frame pieces

Hardwood splines reinforce corner butt joints

OVERALL DIMENSIONS: 41V2"Wx 1s/i6"D x 271/i"H

Pre-made marquetry medallion dresses up corner block

Cross banding cut from veneer sheets

Inlay stringing helps square up arquetry medalHon

Corner blocks have roundover with shoulder i I

Inlay stringing helps square up arquetry medalHon

Pre-made marquetry medallion dresses up corner block

Cross banding cut from veneer sheets

Screws allow easy removal of mirror

Inlay strips

Burl veneer applied first

Cut edging extra long, then trim after attaching to frame pieces

NOTE: Frame pieces made from Vi-thick poplar

Inlay glued in rabbets routed on frame pieces

SHORT EDGING

SHORT FRAME \PIECE.

LONG EDGING

Rout profile on extra-wide blank

NOTE: Edging made from Vi'-thick mahogany

Inlay strips -mitered with chisel and miter block

LONG FRAME V LONG EDGING PIECE

edge molding are added to complete the same, exact length. A stop block the frame pieces. The box along the set up on the miter gauge will give bottom of the page gives a good you consistent results, as shown in overview of the steps in the process, the box on the bottom of the page.

FRAME PIECES. There isn't much to Once the pieces are sized, you're making the frame pieces, but there ready to start adding some detail. I

are a couple of things to point out. started in the center of the frame

First, since the pieces aren't visible pieces and worked my way out.

once the frame is assembled, I used VENEER FIRST. The first thing to do an inexpensive wood — poplar. is apply a strip of veneer to the top

Second, for the frame joinery to of the frame piece. I used Carpathian end up square, you'll want to take elm burl veneer, but any fancy care to cut all the matching parts to veneer will work. When gluing the

I began building with the frame pieces. You can make them any length you want. For the rectangular frame shown here, I used two short pieces and two long ones.

In the drawing above, you can see that veneer, inlay strips, and some

Cauls

Stop block used to make identical parts

FRAME PIECE

Veneer

FRAME PIECE

Cut Rails to Length. To end up with a square assembly, the frame pieces need to be cut precisely A stop block on the miter gauge makes this a snap.

Gluing the Veneer. A set of hardwood cauls and plenty of clamps provides the pressure needed for a flat veneer bond.

Trim Veneer Flush. After the glue dries, use a veneer saw to trim the veneer flush with the edges of the frame pieces.

Veneer \saw

Trim veneer flush to rails _

Scrap piece veneer down, you want the veneer as flat as possible (no bubbles or lumps). To do that, I used a pair of cauls and plenty of clamps.

I usually use yellow glue to attach veneer, but here I used veneer glue. It's thicker than ordinary glue and contains ground pecan shells to help prevent the glue from bleeding through the veneer and affecting the finish later on. To find out where to get it, turn to page 49.

INLAY STRIPS. To set off the veneer, it's framed with a mite red inlay strip. Usually, this kind of strip is set in flush with the surface of the wood. And that's easy to do on this frame with a simple rabbet.

I took the workpiece over to the router table for this step. Using a straight bit to rout the rabbet makes it easy to get a perfectly smooth, flat-bottomed surface for the inlay to rest in. A few test cuts will help you get everything set just right.

After routing the rabbet, the inlay can then be cut and glued in place. As simple as that sounds, there's a little more to gluing them in place. First of all, the inlay strips are pretty brittle. You have to handle them gently to avoid snapping them apart.

MITERING TO FIT. Another thing to consider is the technique for

Shop Tip: Veneer Miter Block

Width of \ cross banding

Keep chisel back flat against guide block

Width of \ cross banding

Keep chisel back flat against guide block mitering them to fit around the rail. I used a chisel to cut the inlay to fit. A saw would be too rough and could tear the inlay. To guide the chisel I made a simple "miter block" (drawing above). The block has a 45° miter cut on one end that guides the chisel. A pair of grooves cut in the block are sized to hold the inlay strips and cross banding.

When it comes to fitting the inlay, I needed a way to position the first piece accurately. To do this, I used a short piece of inlay to serve as a guide. Hold the guide piece in place along one of the short edges of the rail. Then butt a long piece in place, registering it against both the veneer and the guide piece.

GLUING THE INLAY. It's almost impossible to clamp the inlay — so I didn't even try. Instead, I just used my fingers to hold down short sections (about 6") while the glue set up.

EDGING. To protect the edges of the frame pieces, I added some mahogany edging. The edging is pretty straightforward. It has a bull nose profile routed on the top edge. The box below shows how it's made. Finally, the edging can be glued on. The edging is left extra long. This way, you can trim it perfectly flush with the ends of the frame pieces.

Routing for Inlay. A straight bit in the router table makes a flat-bottom rabbet for the inlay.

Applying Inlay. A mitered spacer makes it easy to posi- Shaping the Edgings. Rout the profile tion the first strip of inlay. On the long edges, apply of the edge molding on an extra-wide glue to short sections and use finger pressure. blank. Then rip to width.

Routing for Inlay. A straight bit in the router table makes a flat-bottom rabbet for the inlay.

Applying Inlay. A mitered spacer makes it easy to posi- Shaping the Edgings. Rout the profile tion the first strip of inlay. On the long edges, apply of the edge molding on an extra-wide glue to short sections and use finger pressure. blank. Then rip to width.

Cross banding

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